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3 Hobbies That Help You Get Over Addiction

3 Hobbies That Help You Get Over Addiction

If you’re trying to get over an addiction that’s taking control of your life, the National Institutes of Health advises you to busy yourself with hobbies. If your mind is idle, you’ll have nothing to concentrate on but your urges and withdrawal symptoms. When your brain is bombarded by new stimuli from doing activities, it drowns out addiction-based pains and drives.

Here are a few hobbies proven to help you conquer your struggle with addiction:

1. Doing Yoga

Researchers found that regularly practising yoga promotes recovery from addiction. They found that regular yoga practice puts your body in a state that interrupts stress and resets your fight-or-flight tendencies, which is what’s triggered when you’re going through withdrawal.

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When you do yoga poses coupled with special, slow and long breathing techniques, the combination has been found to relax you and stimulate the pleasure centers in areas of your brain that lead to states of bliss. It also lowers activity in the area of your brain responsible for fear and aggression – two hallmark symptoms of withdrawal. So, when you do yoga your brain gets a healthy substitute for reward (instead of drugs) while downplaying your symptoms of withdrawal.

Doing yoga also boosts your blood flow and levels of oxygen-rich blood cells, which breathe more oxygen into your cells – aiding in your body’s detox processes. In fact, drug detox centers often incorporate yoga into their rehab programs because yoga’s twisting poses force out stagnant blood from veins in your internal organs, which contain toxins and byproducts from drugs. Then when you release from the twist, nutrient-rich oxygenated blood flows in from arteries to help rejuvenate these organs.

As a bonus, if you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis, yoga has also been found to help alleviate your condition. Plantar fasciitis is the painful inflammation of your sole, which is often caused by sports injuries, working long hours on your feet everyday, or wearing improper footwear for long periods of time. The piercing pain from taking a step in the morning, after inactivity, or up the stairs can be exacerbating. Effective remedies include special shoe inserts and custom-made night splints that relieve pressure on your sole, but doctors also often prescribe pain medications to plantar fasciitis patients, but this can lead to dependency and addiction. Doing yoga stretches the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon, which researchers found to be very effective in treating plantar fasciitis. Not only does daily yoga loosen and relieve stress from your plantar fasciitis, it also helps prevent you from becoming addicted to your pain medication.

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2. Making Sushi

Making your own sushi and the art of making sushi can be surprisingly therapeutic. Making sushi isn’t like frying an omelette or grilling a steak. According to Business Insider, making sushi is an art that takes the best students more than two years to perfect. You have to cut the fish swiftly, but gracefully, and some sushi students have compared it to performing surgery. Combining the rice with the fish is equally demanding – not enough rice makes the fish taste too strong but too much means the sushi roll won’t fit in the diner’s mouth. And if you apply too much pressure the sushi roll will be too hard, but not enough makes the roll fall apart.

Unlike most forms of food preparation that you can do on automatic, making sushi requires actually focusing on what you’re doing and tremendous concentration. This demand for constant focus on the present is what makes the art of making sushi a mindfulness practice. Mindfulness is a form of active meditation where you keep your attention on the present with a neutral perspective. When you’re focusing on making sushi, you have to pay attention to every action you do. Researchers found that this constant focus on the present relieves stress and lowers your cravings, because stress is one of the top causes for drug use and you’re also interrupting your auto reaction to use drugs since you’re more aware of your actions and thoughts.

Making sushi to fight addiction also means you’ll be eating more sushi – and that helps you fight the harmful effects of addiction too! The fish in sushi is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which researchers found protects your brain up to 90 percent from alcohol’s brain-damaging effects. If you’re scared to try eating raw fish and dreading what it tastes like – don’t be! After artistically dressing the raw fish with rice, herbs, tofu, and other mouth-watering ingredients, you might become addicted to sushi’s exotic taste instead.

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If you start practising the art of making sushi everyday, you’ll be able to control your cravings better while lowering your stress and becoming more in control over your urges. At the same time, you’re also protecting your brain from alcohol’s harmful effects by eating the yummy sushi you’ve made.

3. Gardening

Like making sushi, gardening is another mindfulness hobby that gets you focusing on the present. But unlike making sushi, gardening gets you out in nature and bathed in sunlight, which has been found to improve your mood and lower your anxiety and stress. Sun exposure boosts your vitamin D levels, which has been found to alleviate depressive moods. Since depression is one of the main reasons people abuse drugs, getting some sun by gardening helps lower cravings.

Immersing yourself in nature has also been found to lessen depression, boost energy levels, boost your sense of wellbeing, and boost your pain tolerance. In fact, patients with pictures of nature in their hospital rooms experienced better pain tolerance than those who didn’t – so imagine what gardening in nature will do for your pain! With better pain tolerance, you’ll feel less tempted to abuse painkillers, drugs or alcohol.

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According to Dr. Philip Smith of the National Institutes of Health, gardening also makes you eat more fruits and vegetables, which are rich in antioxidants and nutrients that help flush drugs and their toxic byproducts from your body. Medline Plus says that including more fiber-rich produce in your diet can lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms, like diarrhea and constipation. Alcohol depletes your B vitamins, and long-term drinking can lead to a B vitamin deficiency, which causes dizziness, nausea, and other withdrawal-like symptoms. Fresh produce is rich in B vitamins, thus helping alleviate these symptoms by replenishing your B vitamin levels.

Another great benefit of gardening is that you’re growing organic vegetables without the price tag. Organic vegetables have been found to contain more essential polyamine antioxidants, which your body needs for daily processes and they also help neutralize drugs and their toxic byproducts in your body.

Get more control over your addiction by trying these three holistically healthy hobbies today!

Featured photo credit: geralt via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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