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3 Hobbies That Help You Get Over Addiction

3 Hobbies That Help You Get Over Addiction

If you’re trying to get over an addiction that’s taking control of your life, the National Institutes of Health advises you to busy yourself with hobbies. If your mind is idle, you’ll have nothing to concentrate on but your urges and withdrawal symptoms. When your brain is bombarded by new stimuli from doing activities, it drowns out addiction-based pains and drives.

Here are a few hobbies proven to help you conquer your struggle with addiction:

1. Doing Yoga

Researchers found that regularly practising yoga promotes recovery from addiction. They found that regular yoga practice puts your body in a state that interrupts stress and resets your fight-or-flight tendencies, which is what’s triggered when you’re going through withdrawal.

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When you do yoga poses coupled with special, slow and long breathing techniques, the combination has been found to relax you and stimulate the pleasure centers in areas of your brain that lead to states of bliss. It also lowers activity in the area of your brain responsible for fear and aggression – two hallmark symptoms of withdrawal. So, when you do yoga your brain gets a healthy substitute for reward (instead of drugs) while downplaying your symptoms of withdrawal.

Doing yoga also boosts your blood flow and levels of oxygen-rich blood cells, which breathe more oxygen into your cells – aiding in your body’s detox processes. In fact, drug detox centers often incorporate yoga into their rehab programs because yoga’s twisting poses force out stagnant blood from veins in your internal organs, which contain toxins and byproducts from drugs. Then when you release from the twist, nutrient-rich oxygenated blood flows in from arteries to help rejuvenate these organs.

As a bonus, if you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis, yoga has also been found to help alleviate your condition. Plantar fasciitis is the painful inflammation of your sole, which is often caused by sports injuries, working long hours on your feet everyday, or wearing improper footwear for long periods of time. The piercing pain from taking a step in the morning, after inactivity, or up the stairs can be exacerbating. Effective remedies include special shoe inserts and custom-made night splints that relieve pressure on your sole, but doctors also often prescribe pain medications to plantar fasciitis patients, but this can lead to dependency and addiction. Doing yoga stretches the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon, which researchers found to be very effective in treating plantar fasciitis. Not only does daily yoga loosen and relieve stress from your plantar fasciitis, it also helps prevent you from becoming addicted to your pain medication.

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2. Making Sushi

Making your own sushi and the art of making sushi can be surprisingly therapeutic. Making sushi isn’t like frying an omelette or grilling a steak. According to Business Insider, making sushi is an art that takes the best students more than two years to perfect. You have to cut the fish swiftly, but gracefully, and some sushi students have compared it to performing surgery. Combining the rice with the fish is equally demanding – not enough rice makes the fish taste too strong but too much means the sushi roll won’t fit in the diner’s mouth. And if you apply too much pressure the sushi roll will be too hard, but not enough makes the roll fall apart.

Unlike most forms of food preparation that you can do on automatic, making sushi requires actually focusing on what you’re doing and tremendous concentration. This demand for constant focus on the present is what makes the art of making sushi a mindfulness practice. Mindfulness is a form of active meditation where you keep your attention on the present with a neutral perspective. When you’re focusing on making sushi, you have to pay attention to every action you do. Researchers found that this constant focus on the present relieves stress and lowers your cravings, because stress is one of the top causes for drug use and you’re also interrupting your auto reaction to use drugs since you’re more aware of your actions and thoughts.

Making sushi to fight addiction also means you’ll be eating more sushi – and that helps you fight the harmful effects of addiction too! The fish in sushi is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which researchers found protects your brain up to 90 percent from alcohol’s brain-damaging effects. If you’re scared to try eating raw fish and dreading what it tastes like – don’t be! After artistically dressing the raw fish with rice, herbs, tofu, and other mouth-watering ingredients, you might become addicted to sushi’s exotic taste instead.

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If you start practising the art of making sushi everyday, you’ll be able to control your cravings better while lowering your stress and becoming more in control over your urges. At the same time, you’re also protecting your brain from alcohol’s harmful effects by eating the yummy sushi you’ve made.

3. Gardening

Like making sushi, gardening is another mindfulness hobby that gets you focusing on the present. But unlike making sushi, gardening gets you out in nature and bathed in sunlight, which has been found to improve your mood and lower your anxiety and stress. Sun exposure boosts your vitamin D levels, which has been found to alleviate depressive moods. Since depression is one of the main reasons people abuse drugs, getting some sun by gardening helps lower cravings.

Immersing yourself in nature has also been found to lessen depression, boost energy levels, boost your sense of wellbeing, and boost your pain tolerance. In fact, patients with pictures of nature in their hospital rooms experienced better pain tolerance than those who didn’t – so imagine what gardening in nature will do for your pain! With better pain tolerance, you’ll feel less tempted to abuse painkillers, drugs or alcohol.

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According to Dr. Philip Smith of the National Institutes of Health, gardening also makes you eat more fruits and vegetables, which are rich in antioxidants and nutrients that help flush drugs and their toxic byproducts from your body. Medline Plus says that including more fiber-rich produce in your diet can lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms, like diarrhea and constipation. Alcohol depletes your B vitamins, and long-term drinking can lead to a B vitamin deficiency, which causes dizziness, nausea, and other withdrawal-like symptoms. Fresh produce is rich in B vitamins, thus helping alleviate these symptoms by replenishing your B vitamin levels.

Another great benefit of gardening is that you’re growing organic vegetables without the price tag. Organic vegetables have been found to contain more essential polyamine antioxidants, which your body needs for daily processes and they also help neutralize drugs and their toxic byproducts in your body.

Get more control over your addiction by trying these three holistically healthy hobbies today!

Featured photo credit: geralt via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on December 18, 2018

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

A couple of months ago, I met up with an old friend of mine who I hadn’t seen since last year. Over lunch, we talked about all kinds of things, including our careers, relationships and hobbies.

My friend told me his job had become dull and uninteresting to him, and despite applying for promotion – he’d been turned down. His personal life wasn’t great either, as he told me that he’d recently separated from his long-term girlfriend.

When I asked him why things had seemingly gone wrong at home and work, he paused for a moment, and then replied:

“I’m having a run of bad luck.”

I was surprised by his response as I’d never thought of him as someone who thought that luck controlled his life. He always appeared to be someone who knew what he wanted – and went after it with gusto.

He told me he did believe in bad luck because of everything happened to me.

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It was at this point, that I shared my opinion on luck and destiny:

While chance events certainly occur, they are purely random in nature. In other words, good luck and bad luck don’t exist in the way that people believe. And more importantly, even if random negative events do come along, our perspective and reaction can turn them into positive things.

Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

1. Stop believing that what happens in life is out of your control.

Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

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They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

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In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.

It definitely wasn’t an easy time for her. She was stressful and tired. But it wasn’t bad luck that was playing the role.

Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

I explained to Kelly that to improve her fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to her; then try to focus on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.

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A few months later, she told me that she finally found two investors who were really interested in her project and would like to work with her to grow the business. I was really glad that she could take back control of her destiny and achieved what she wanted.

Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

What’s Next?

Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!

If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over with these 7 Cornerstone Skills. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

“I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

More Ideas About Creating Your Own Luck

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Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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