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The Year that Just Wouldn’t Quit

The Year that Just Wouldn’t Quit

I think we can all agree that 2016 needs to come to come to an end…the sooner the better. Preferably yesterday.

Down with 2016!

Every social media outlet, friends and family have stressed the trials that 2016 has brought. If you conduct a search on the internet, you will come across countless articles with the same theme; Predictions I Wish Didn’t Come True in 2016. Dear 2016: You are the Worst Year and Here’s Why. Hashtags revolting against this year have emerged to join forces against the evil powers that be.

#RIP; to some of the greats; Price, David Bowie and Muhammad Ali to name a few.

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#BlackLivesMatter; in the wake of shootings and racial injustices creating national conversations.

#Election; creating chains of discussions and arguments around one of the most controversial elections in history. Even a flurry of memes have emerged displaying the “before and after” effects 2016 personally bestowed upon them.

“Me at the beginning of 2016 vs. the end of 2016” are hilarious, yet so utterly truthful. Oh, Leo, we all get it, trust us.

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    Twitter

    Universe, I beg of you. Have we not suffered enough?

    Exploring my own personal struggles, I can’t remember a time where I have felt more pain and anguish spanning over months. Not just a single event, but continuous, hard blows to my psyche. So much change was surrounding me at once that I had never experienced before. My coping strategies were lacking and eventually had a breakdown. My company swallowed a 15% budget cut; which equated to 24 talented and cherished employees. Both my parents were diagnosed with cancer and I was divorced. Those are certainly heavy crosses bear. Somehow, though, every single morning I woke up. I opened my eyes to a day reset. Another chance to take on the world; or in 2016’s case, dodge some more bullets.

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    One of the few good things that I can point out, is the birth of my nephew. But even that was veiled in irony; he was born on April 1st. The universe literally had a laugh at our expenses. Twisted, I know.

    Enough is enough.

    It’s exhausting to regal over all of these events, but it is with purpose. I’ll put a gentle reminder back out to everyone; we are all in the same boat. Though all from different walks of life and experiences, we are sharing the same struggle. We all get it. I have never felt such a rise of empathy and unity. So in the moments where your life has beaten you down and you’re dragging your feet; remember, we are here for you. We support you. As much turmoil as there was, there was a collective joining of forces across not only the nation, but globally. Social media certainly dampened the mood on 2016, yet let us not forget that positive events were still occurring, just may not have been broadcasted as well. The bad always seems to outweigh the good, doesn’t it?

    So as 2017 rapidly approaches, let us collectively have a shift in our mindsets. We shouldn’t let the negative forces follow us into a new year; a mark of a chance to start anew.  Let us instead take our trials, our worries, fears and bad memories and mold not only 2017 but our entire futures with a stronger, braver outlook. We have made it; we have done it. Let’s hold on to that thought and use it as momentum to carry us forward. For time has not crumbled and given up on us. The world is still happening and evolving around us. Let us be an integral part of that with our knowledge and experiences. Though it was hard, the proof of our strength is that we are still standing, persevering and moving forward day by day. So when you find yourself in 2017 facing adversary, frustration, struggle and doubt; just stop and say to the universe:

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    “Try me.”

    #2017strong

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    Jillian Skoczylas

    Clinical Liaison for Intensive Care Management at Beacon Health Options

    The Year that Just Wouldn’t Quit Hindsight is 20/20: 5 Lessons From Your Life

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

    The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

    Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

    your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

      Why You Need a Vision

      Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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      How to Create Your Life Vision

      Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

      What Do You Want?

      The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

      It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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      Some tips to guide you:

      • Remember to ask why you want certain things
      • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
      • Give yourself permission to dream.
      • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
      • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

      Some questions to start your exploration:

      • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
      • What would you like to have more of in your life?
      • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
      • What are your secret passions and dreams?
      • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
      • What do you want your relationships to be like?
      • What qualities would you like to develop?
      • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
      • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
      • What would you most like to accomplish?
      • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

      It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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      What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

      Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

      A few prompts to get you started:

      • What will you have accomplished already?
      • How will you feel about yourself?
      • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
      • What does your ideal day look like?
      • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
      • What would you be doing?
      • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
      • How are you dressed?
      • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
      • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
      • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

      It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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      Plan Backwards

      It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

      • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
      • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
      • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
      • What important actions would you have had to take?
      • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
      • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
      • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
      • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
      • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

      Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

      It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

      Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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