Advertising
Advertising

15 Great Places to Retire in 2017

15 Great Places to Retire in 2017

After a long career of working hard and likely living in just one town or city, retirement becomes a great opportunity to not only stop working but to also experience new places.

By retiring to locale outside of where you worked, you’ll see new cultures and taste new foods. Travel is always great but it’s even better if you can turn your getaway into a permanent paradise. Here are a few options to consider when searching for your 2017 retirement location.

1. Phoenix, Arizona

Generally speaking, when seeking retirement locations, climate is a major factor in the decision … and the warmer the better. Phoenix is sunny for the majority of the year and offers a low daily cost of living. This is also a great choice for the dedicated sports fan as most events are easily accessible.

Advertising

2. Algarve, Portugal

Lined with beautiful beaches, this city is marked by great weather and a low cost of living. There is also a strong expatriate community that will help you ease into your new neighborhood a bit easier. And despite being in Portugal, you can survive just by using English. There are also a variety of architectural sights and natural beauty to take in.

3. Budapest

Located in Hungary and with many locations listed as part of the UNESCO World Site, Budapest is a beautiful and historic European city. Highlights include the Gellert Baths (a massive spa with an open air wave pool); Margaret Island, which is located in the middle of the Danube River; and the House of Terror, which has displays of Hungarian history during its fascist and communist regimes. With so many great options, your retirement here will be filled with lots of different things to do.

4. Cape Coral, Florida

Of course Florida is among the choices of places to retire. But Cape Coral is lovely and unique because it’s made up of more canals than roads. It is called the “Waterfront Wonderland” because of this. While slightly expensive, the beautiful scenery and aquatic activities make it a great choice for those seeking to be close to water but not on a beach.

Advertising

5. Abruzzo, Italy

Abruzzo is one of the loveliest spots in Italy, offering a selection of both mountains and beaches. So if you’re into getting a tan while sipping drinks on a beach or glide down a mountain on skis, you have the option for both. It should also be noted this city is fairly quiet, not having a large seasonal tourist population or any modern industrial additions to ruin the scenery. And like most of the other cities of the country, food is important and crafted carefully.

6. Chiang Mai, Thailand

Thailand is known as foreigner-friendly and offers a setting of abundant green jungles, superb beaches, gorgeous mountains and a laid back, casual lifestyle. The country also has affordable and highly rated healthcare services, which is a great selling point for retirees. Just make sure to swap out your tourist visa for one of long-term residency.

7. Caen, France

Offering up such sights as the Abbey of Sainte-Trinité, the Mémorial de Caen, and the fine arts museum located in Château de Caen, this is a great and quiet city marked with historical significance. Besides the art museum, there is another that documents Normandy’s history, before and during wartimes. Caen is definitely a place to relax and unwind from those working years.

Advertising

8. Sliema, Malta

While exceptional in terms of sunshine (more than 3,000 hours per year), Sliema is a popular and crowded place to live. Despite that, the warm temperatures make it a very attractive location. This is also a place where just speaking English will be enough. And if you ever feel claustrophobic, Malta’s sister island Gozo is short ferry trip away.

9. Colorado Springs, Colorado

This city has a marked military presence with Peterson Air Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Schriever Air Force Base to name a few.  But it is also home to some wonderful universities if higher education is part of your retirement goals. And if not, you can simply enjoy the skiing or other natural attractions like Seven Falls, the Cave of the Winds or Pikes Peak.

10. Puerto Vallarta, México

Coming from America, this Mexican city offers a host of familiar creature comforts. Take all of what you enjoy about where you live (Internet, easily accessible flights to and from the United States, great infrastructure and even familiar retail chain stores) and put it all in a nice, lush tropical setting. The cost of living is also quite low.

Advertising

11. St. Andrews, Scotland

It makes sense that the birthplace of golfing would be a great and desirable spot for retirees. Whether playing or just watching, St. Andrews offers a variety of choices for the golf fan, from the novice to the most experienced.  There is also an inviting charm found here that surrounds the city and makes everyone feel welcomed.

12. Panama City, Panama

Built by fantastic examples of modern engineering, the Panama Canal is just a short ways away from Panama City and makes a great attraction. There are also museums, an array of French monuments and Indian villages. The city also offers a special visa, called a Pensionado that is available to anyone whose pension starts at a minimum of 1,000 per month.

13. Granada, Nicaragua

Named after Spain’s ancient city of the same name, modern Granada still maintains some of its early colonial charm and architectural style. It has a large expat community and several upscale areas filled with great restaurants and well-maintained buildings.

14. Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic

Located in the Caribbean and sporting warm, turquoise seas lined with white sand beaches, the Dominican Republic is a great, diverse retirement option. Because of its location, it is a collection of several cultures, ranging from North American to Afro-Caribbean. And with an extremely cheap cost of living, you can actually move fairly easily from one island to another.

15. Cuenca, Ecuador

This is a charming city where you can get a coffee in a café that still has its old world Spanish-colonial style. The climate is outdoor activity friendly but recent economic shifts make this a more expensive choice. Even so, comparatively, the real estate market is still low and open enough for you to own where you spend your retirement.

More by this author

Sasha Brown

Seasoned Blogger

11 Obvious Signs He Wants to Marry You 11 Signs He Wants to Marry You (Even You Are at the Early Stages) 11 Must-Follow Natural Health Blogs for 2017 11 Must-Follow Natural Health Blogs for 2017 11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees 11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees 7 Ways to Effectively Cope With Emotional Stress Seven Ways to Effectively Cope with Emotional Stress 10 amazon review sites that will get you really good deals 10 Amazon Review Sites That Will Get You Really Good Deals

Trending in Lifestyle

1 The Effects of Stress on Your Body And Mind (You Never Knew) 2 7 Signs You’re Burnt out (And How to Bounce Back) 3 How to Cope with COVID Anxiety And Stress 4 7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks 5 How to Find Purpose in Life and Make Yourself a Better Person

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

Advertising

If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

Advertising

Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

Advertising

Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

    Advertising

    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

    Read Next