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4 Outdoor Winter Activities For People That Hate Skiing

4 Outdoor Winter Activities For People That Hate Skiing

Depending on where you live, winter can be very long and dreary. It may be pleasant for people that enjoy skiing and snowboarding, but everyone else has a hard time making it through the winter.

Fortunately, there are a lot of other outdoor activities for people that don’t want to ski or snowboard. Here are a few that you may want to try.

1. Hunting

If you live in a wooden, rural part of the country, you probably have a lot of wild game near you. You may have a great time hunting.

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The best place to start is your local Fish and Game office. Here are some things you will want to find out:

  • How many animals are you allowed to hunt? Be sure to do a little research on what types of animal you can kill and when you can do so. You should also be aware of the fact that hunting laws differ from state to state.
  • What requirements do you need to meet to be certified to hunt? You will generally need to be able to kill a large animal (such as a deer or moose) with a single shot because they don’t want injured animals walking into traffic or getting stuck in people’s swimming pools.
  • What is the best game to hunt in your area? You can usually hunt deer, moose, rabbits, and a lot of other game.
  • Where are the best hunting locations? Your local Fish and Game office usually has a great list.

If you have never been hunting before, you can usually get good tips from other hunters in your area. They may know of some good places that no one else has heard of.

2. Snowshoeing

According to research from Snowsports Industries America (SIA), nearly 4 million people go snowshoeing every year. It can be an exciting way for people of all ages to spend time outside.

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If you are interested in trying snowshoeing, here are a few things you’ll want to know:

  • Find a snowshoe that fits your foot properly. This will make everything a lot easier.
  • Start off on level ground. Unlike skiing and snowboarding, you will have a much easier time going snowshoeing on level ground. It takes a lot of energy to lift your legs with a snowshoe attached to your foot. It’s even harder while fighting gravity.
  • Plan a short trip the first couple of times. It takes time to condition yourself to going on long snowshoeing excursions because you are using different muscles than you would for running. You probably don’t want to go more than a quarter mile each day on your first couple of trips.
  • Dress in extra layers. Some people dress down a little in the winter. That may be okay when you are outside for 10 or 15 minutes, but you can develop hypothermia if you are out for longer than that. Snowshoeing takes time and you won’t be able to rush back if you start getting cold. Put on a few more layers than you usually would when going outside during the winter. Drake clothing tends to be good for winter weather.

Snowshoeing is a lot of fun, but it takes time to get used to. Be prepared and be patient.

3. Snowmobiling

Snowmobiling is another popular activity you may want to get into. You can buy a used snowmobile for as little as $2000.

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If you have never gone before, you may want to ride with a more experienced snowboarder. There are over 3,000 snowmobiling clubs in the United States and Canada. You may want to check them out and see if anyone wants to ride with you.

You’ll also want to know where the best snowmobile trails are.

4. Winter Amusement Parks

Believe it or not, some amusement parks are open during the winter. Santa’s Village, Silver Dollar City, Hersheypark, and Kennywood are a few of the best.

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Of course, Disney World is also open during the winter, but you will have to pay close to $1,000 for each ticket. It’s better to find less popular places.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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