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10 Self-Improvement Tips for Winter (None of Which Require Leaving the House)

10 Self-Improvement Tips for Winter (None of Which Require Leaving the House)

Winter is a season that most people tough out, but there are joys to be had beyond the holidays.

Let the coldest time of year remind you of light and warmth, with acts of self-improvement and love, all within the cozy walls of your home. Your house is your hearth after all, and a few tips will see you through the season:

1. Batch Cook Comfort Food

There’s nothing like a good home-cooked meal, and while you’re at it, why not make extra? Stash away freezer meals to pop in the oven later for nutritious comfort food on the chilliest of days.

Take a whole day to tend to stew, soup, chili or lasagna. If you prefer to stay in bed, put together some tasty freezer meals in your slow cooker. Once it’s done, just store it away.

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2. Update Your Journal

At some point, you’ve started a journal, and it’s been several weeks, months or years since you’ve added to it. Write a new entry, even if it’s from the perspective of your cat observing your day. Make it strange! Make it interesting! Write about how you feel.

3. Write a Novel

You may have always wanted to try your hand at novel writing. First drafts are meant to be crappy. It’s a rite of passage to the glorious revision. Write, now!

Keep a pad and pen with you. Write a few sentences between chores or during a conversation with the friend who takes 10 years to describe a 10-minute moment. It all adds up.

4. Build a Capsule Wardrobe

Are you guilty of a badly put together grab-and-go look? Fling open your closet door, pull the clothes out of your drawers and mix and match. Build your own capsule wardrobe, with a few versatile pieces you love, that you can rearrange into many different outfits. It’s a mix of functional and stylish pants, shirts, blouses, skirts, dresses, and outerwear.

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The payoffs are big. You don’t waste time raiding your closet. You realize what a waste of time binge shopping is, and save money because you’re finally satisfied with your wardrobe. Only update it as needed.

5. Regulate Your Sleep Cycle

Hibernation may be for the bears, but you want to stay in bed, too. It’s understandable to not be as motivated as you would during the summer. Think of winter as the perfect time to finally regulate your sleeping schedule.

A lack of quality sleep affects your concentration, mood, and overall health. Create a ritual to wind down before bed and relax. Stick to set times during the week and on the weekends to go to bed and to wake up. When you regulate your sleep schedule, you’ll also notice improvements in your health and mood.

6. Develop an Indoor Exercise Routine

Whether you practice yoga or Zumba in your home, developing an indoor exercise routine will keep you motivated in the winter months. Exercise will get your blood flowing and keep you warm, producing helpful hormones to keep you alert and stress-free. When you don’t want to go to the gym, a 30-minute workout indoors is just as good.

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7. Learn a New Language

Brush up on another language you learned in school but are out of practice with. There are many beautiful languages with unique idioms and phrases that express complex emotions with one simple word. Expand your horizons and rewire the way you speak, think and relate to learning a new language.

8. Pamper Your Skin

Once a week, have a spa day and take care of your skin. After all, it’s your body’s largest organ. Your skin protects you from disease and helps keep you warm in the winter. Give it love with homemade skin care recipes, from natural face masks to creamy body lotions.

9. Organize the Messiest Space

Whether it’s your desk, closet or a storage room, organize the messiest space in your home. The rest of your house and life won’t look so challenging, once the biggest mess is out of the way.

10. Do One Random, Silly Thing Every Day

Playtime is good for adults, and you know you work too hard. Turn off your cell phone and take off the serious mask.

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Release your inner child for unstructured playtime. Have a dance party. Build a blanket fort. Skip on your way to the bathroom. Sing in the shower. When you let yourself play, you’ll boost your mood, be more productive and laugh.

Avoid the seasonal blues and have a good winter by staying engaged with life. Keep warm and cozy indoors as you cook comfort food, write the great American novel or learn a new language. Winter may mean longer nights, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy them.

Featured photo credit: Giulia Bertelli via unsplash.com

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Kayla Matthews

Productivity and self-improvement blogger

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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