Advertising
Advertising

If You Want To Know More About Someone, Try Their Most Played Songs List

If You Want To Know More About Someone, Try Their Most Played Songs List

Think you’re taking a glance into the deepest, darkest recesses of someone’s soul? Not quite, it’s Spotify’s list of the most listened to songs of 2016. But according to research, song lists can give us a lot more than a mere glimpse into which tunes have gone viral this year.

A three-year investigation carried out by Dr. Adrian North of Curtin University, Australia, correlated the music preferences and personality traits of over 36,000 volunteers. The study’s findings[1] revealed that those who listened predominantly to a specific genre were likely to have certain personality traits associated with that style of music.

So if you’ve ever felt an instant connection to someone because of the music they like, or if you’ve gone the other way and cringed when someone told you what their favourite song was, don’t worry, you’re not alone.

Advertising

What can Spotify’s 2016 top streaming list tell us about people’s behaviour

Hip Hop

Well, Drake tops the list for most streamed artist of the year. According to North’s research, hip-hop fans are extroverted and have high self-esteem. They’re less likely to want to sit in their bedrooms poring over the sleeve notes, a pair of headphones shutting out the outside world.

Rap

Another University of Texas study suggested that rap listeners are liberal, tend to perceive themselves as attractive but are also prone to ‘blirtatiousness’, which is best described as saying what’s on one’s mind as soon as it comes up. Kanye West is certainly prone to it. We’ll leave you to decide if it’s a good or a bad thing.

Advertising

Pop

Justin Bieber, meanwhile, maintains his position as one of the most streamed artists this year. His attempts at breaking out of teen pop into a more rough-hewn gangster persona may have swayed some, but for those who categorise his music as pop, it is associated with low creativity and nervousness. It’s not all bad though! According to North’s investigation, pop fans also have high self-esteem, as well as being hard-working and outgoing.

Classic Rock

The Beatles are currently Spotify’s top classic rock artists of 2016. North’s study claims that classic rock fans are easygoing, though there’s a caveat. They’re also the most selfish according to the results. If Bon Jovi and the Beatles can both be classified as classic rock though, that’s a pretty wide-ranging genre right there!

Indie Rock

Indie rock fans, who sometimes get a bad rep as hipsters, are vindicated by the findings, which suggest they are creative and open to new experiences. There is a flipside, however, as they have a low self-esteem and work ethic.

Advertising

Folk, Jazz, Blues

Older styles such as folk, jazz and blues are, perhaps unsurprisingly, associated with deep thinkers, the genres being a staple for this years surprise Nobel literature prizewinner, Bob Dylan.

Classical music

Classical music lovers are also considered to have high intelligence, high self-esteem and are more likely to be introverted. Though these genres are practically non-existent on Spotify’s most streamed list of 2016, they’re undeniably present in spirit, modern artists borrowing heavily from the styles.

It’s a bit farfetched perhaps to think that a song list can give us a really profound insight into human behaviour. However, North’s paper does draw a direct correlation between musical listening habits and the behavioural traits mentioned.

Advertising

What Else Does Research Say About Music?

Not only is classical music associated with smarter people, it is also associated with actively making us smarter. There is existing scientific evidence that suggests classical music can boost brain power[2]. An experiment was carried out in which the exact same lecture was given to two group of students. One, however, was listening to classical music throughout and the other had no music on.

The students were tested on the material of the lecture afterwards. According to the researchers “students who heard the music-enhanced lecture scored significantly higher on the quiz than those who heard the music-free version.”

So educators can help students absorb information “by turning to some old friends: Beethoven, Bach, and Tchaikovsky.”

Music can also apparently make you a better person. A University of Cambridge study recently highlighted a link between musical learning and enhanced emotional intelligence. Similarly, psychology specialists pointed out that crime and drop out rates decreased a decade ago in Venezuela when music lessons were made mandatory in schools[3].

Musical preference has always been a source of intense emotions. Sometimes it results in equally intense, almost tribal-like, rivalries. Whether it’s Blur vs Oasis or Kanye vs everyone, people may enjoy both but they’ll never concede that the other’s better than their favourite. All we know is that according to mounting evidence, next time you’re sending someone a personal playlist, you may also be sending them a window into your mind.

Reference

More by this author

Christopher Young

Freelance Blogger, Writer and Journalist

To Be More Productive, Never Do This To Start Your Morning If You Play Any Musical Instruments, Your Brain Is Very Different From Others’ Workout Your Brain By Learning A New Word Every Day, You Will Get Smarter Why Most Highly Productive And Successful People Are Minimalists This Amazing Animated Film Reminds Us To Stop Wanting To Have Everything In Control, But Be Present

Trending in Communication

1 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life 2 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience 3 The Real Causes of Lack of Energy That Go Beyond Your Physical Health 4 If You Think You’re in an Unhappy Marriage, Remember These 5 Things 5 10 Ways to Find Learning Motivation Even If You’ve Graduated Long Ago

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

Advertising

It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

Advertising

3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

Advertising

Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

Advertising

6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

Read Next