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Top 10 Lucrative Careers in 2016

Top 10 Lucrative Careers in 2016

Many people wake up and head to their offices or any other place of work every day. Everyone wants to get a good job and make big money. However, the hard reality is that this is not always the case for all, some people end up landing low-paying jobs while others are fortunate enough to snatch the big-money deals. Here is list of the top 10 most lucrative careers in 2016 that would stir a craze among job seekers.

1. Dentists

With an annual salary range between $129,506 and $169,569, it is undeniable that being a dentist was one of the best jobs one could get in 2016, while 20.9% of dentists were considered specialists during 2016.[1] Despite the factors surrounding the level of salary for this job, this has been a great deal for dentist workers, especially in the United States.

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2. Pharmacy Manager

Most workers in this category get to earn about $130,000, which marks it yet another great job for 2016. Pharmacy managers are in charge of compounding and dispensing medications to patients, based on instructions issued by physicians. A Pharmacy Manager is required to have a Doctorate in Medicine and licensure to operate. Looking past 2016, this field is projected to grow 3% within the next ten years.

3. Software Architect

Coming in third, workers in this field earn a base salary of $128,250. These are computer programmers working in design, platforms, and coding standards for a new program or certain software necessary for an organization. It is expected that this job opening will increase by a whole 17% by 2024, according to TechieWord survey last September.

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4. Data Scientist

This is a new field, coming out of the massive increase in information sharing through the Internet. Even though it’s new, this has turned out to be among the top 10 lucrative careers in 2016, with a data scientist taking home $128,240. This job requires analytical thinking that involves data exploration, challenging questions, understand patterns, and a big dose of creativity to ultimately use data to generate business value. With almost every aspect of today’s life inclining towards the internet, it is apparent that this job will continue to develop even more in the future.

5. Solutions Architect

This job attracts a median base salary of $120,000, making it another big kill in the top 10 lucrative careers of 2016. Additionally, this field’s job openings are expected to increase by 9% in the next ten years, which is faster than the current growth average.

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6. IT Manager

Just like solutions architects, IT Managers take home around $120,000, which is not a little sum to earn in the corporate world. These are experts in computers and information systems. They are in charge of planning and coordinating computer-based activities in organizations. The job qualification requires a bachelor’s degree in information science or computer.

7. Information Security Analyst

People working in this sector earn $88,890 annual salary. The growth in this field has resulted from the vulnerability of information online as well as companies’ concerns over data safety. Further, this career is expected to grow by 18% by 2024, which is a great chance for prospective workers eyeing this career choice.

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8. Internet Marketing

This field attracts a tantalizing salary of $80,000 annually. With the number of internet users growing by the day, producers and consumers are looking for more and more ways to meet and exchange products and services. Professionals engaging in this type of occupation have the advantage of a growing job market and a potentially increasing median salary.

9. Audiologist

This is the field for professionals dealing with diagnosing and treating hearing and ear-related problems. An audiologist earns about $73,060, and the industry is expected to grow by 29% by 2024.

10. Personal Injury Lawyer

Although people engaging in this profession do not have a fixed income, it turns out to be among the top 10 lucrative careers in 2016. A personal injury lawyer earns about $73,000 on average. These lawyers deal with lawsuits regarding bodily or mental damage, either from accidents, work-related injuries, or the infamous slip-and-fall cases.[2]

These are just some of the most lucrative jobs in 2016, spanning a broad spectrum of different industries. Whether you are considering a career change or curious as to where the big money is, exploring these lucrative careers is never a bad option. Let’s look forward to 2017 and see how this list changes!

Reference

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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