Advertising
Advertising

5 Myths About Whole Life Insurance Debunked

5 Myths About Whole Life Insurance Debunked

The older we get, the more we want to make sure that we’re financially set for later in life. I have car insurance and renter’s insurance, but I’ve recently delved more into insurance options and learned all about whole life insurance, which I didn’t even plan to look at! Whole life insurance is a permanent life insurance policy that remains in play for the entire duration of the insured’s lifetime. Once the insured has passed, the policy is guarantees that the insurer will pay death benefits to the policy’s beneficiaries.[1] Turns out, there are so many myths and misinformation out there and they are so well-known that I was buying into them without even realizing it, and I was not getting the whole story.

I did some digging and found some of the most common myths people perpetuate when talking about whole life insurance. Prepare to be debunked!

Advertising

Myth 1: It’s really only death insurance.

While whole life insurance does pay out to cover burial costs, which can be very expensive, it can also replace the income of the deceased person, meaning that the money paid out in the estate can actually cover missed wages and potential earnings. This can make the grieving process a tiny bit easier because the mourners aren’t worrying about how to pay the mortgage. It can also ensure that a working mother who died unexpectedly left money to cover her kids’ care.

Myth 2: Whole life insurance isn’t an asset.

It’s not just an insurance policy that you can never touch, it is an asset, similar to a place to store liquid cash. Once your policy gets some cash value built up, its annual rate of return is higher than most savings accounts and money market accounts! You can both withdraw money from the policy like a checking account withdrawal, and you can also borrow against it and leave the liquid cash in place.

Advertising

Myth 3: You can’t borrow against whole life insurance.

You can borrow against it at a significantly lower rate than bank loans and you get a higher return. You also retain your cash value in the policy, because you are not removing liquid cash from the account, but borrowing against it. You can use that money for any reason and are not penalized like you be if you removed money from a 401(k) before being 59 and a half.

Myth 4: You don’t need it if you’re single or have no kids.

Actually, the sooner you start building up your cash value, the better. You may not have beneficiaries now, but you might in the future, and if you started putting $100 per month in your whole life insurance policy 10 years before you had kids, you will already have nearly $12,000 in cash value built up. That money isn’t just for when you die, but can enable you buy a home sooner, borrowing at a lower rate than banks, or allow you to take time off to be with the kid you just had, or other opportunities for you to enjoy your life.

Advertising

Myth 5: It’s unnecessary and too expensive!

According to recently published Busting the Life Insurance Lies, “One dollar paid into your whole life policy can actually perform seven jobs at once: pay the premium, build up cash value, create a waiver of premium rider, install the initial death benefit, provide the ability to leverage cash value through loans, increase the death benefit, and enable Paid-Up Additions.”

This money is cash value dollars, which allows you to access and use the money as needed with no penalties for early removal, like a 401(k), you get a much lower interest rate and can borrow against it, and you get a higher interest rate on cash than in savings or money market accounts, and it also continues to gain value to pay out your potential earnings and burial costs after death.

Advertising

There are a lot of myths to be busted and lies floating around about insurance. Keep doing research, make sure to speak to expert advisors, and ask questions. Whole life insurance is specifically made to help you throughout your whole life!

Reference

[1]https://www.metlife.com/individual/insurance/life-insurance/whole-life-insurance.html

More by this author

Weighted Blanket for Anxiety and Insomnia: How to Make It Work 10 Things to Expect When You Move in Together How to Pick the Best Food for Your Dog 5 Myths About Whole Life Insurance Debunked 7 Great Tips for Training Your Dog

Trending in Health

1 9 Natural Remedies for Insomnia to Help You Achieve Quality Sleep 2 How Guided Meditation for Sleep Improves Your Mindset While Awake 3 Signs of Postnatal Depression And What to Do When It Strikes 4 The Best Way to Sleep to Relieve the 7 Most Common Ailments 5 9 Best Sleep Tracker Apps To Help You Get Adequate Sleep

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

Advertising

The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

Advertising

Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

Advertising

Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

Advertising

Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

    Read Next