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Last Updated on December 24, 2020

15 New Year’s Resolution Ideas to Make This Year Your Best Year

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15 New Year’s Resolution Ideas to Make This Year Your Best Year

With the new year quickly approaching, it’s time to make our resolutions once again.

If you’re like most people, then you have a recurring pattern of creating a resolution, and forgetting about it in less than a month. Studies show that the reason why 92% of people[1] don’t follow through with their resolution is simple — the resolution isn’t exciting enough to get them to take the actions required.

We’re going to help you break this pattern today, because we’ve curated the top 15 new year’s resolution ideas that will put some fire into your belly. We recommend that you choose a few of these, and test them out in the next few days. The biggest mistake people often make is when they try to take on too many goals without having a specific direction to guide them.

Without further ado, here are 15 new year’s resolution ideas.

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1. Travel to a country you’ve never been to

One of the biggest personal growth opportunities comes from discovering new cultures and locations that you’re unfamiliar with. I’ve had the opportunity to travel the world alone, and it’s one of those rare situations that pushed me beyond my comfort zone.

I understand that amid the pandemic it’s diffcult to travel the word, but stay hopeful, you will get to travel again when COVID is over!

2. Less tech, more nature

As we become a more connected world through technology, it can feel impossible to disconnect. This brings with it more stress, baggy eyes, and lack of connection (no pun intended) with the people we love most. You can use free productivity apps to help you block out the distraction and unwind.

3. Learn a new language

If you’ve been putting off learning a new language, this is the year to make it happen. As the world is becoming a more globalized place by the minute, having a foreign language under your belt is transitioning from a ‘nice-to-have’ to a ‘must-have’ skill in life, and in the workplace.

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4. Invest 10% of your salary/income on yourself

Warren Buffett is famous for sharing that the best investment you can make is in yourself. Whether it’s $100 or a $1,000, allocate a portion of your salary to invest in yourself. This could be your education, your health, your love life, whatever you want to improve in your life.

5. Explore a new career opportunity

If you’ve been in a career that is not maximizing your full potential, it might be time for you to take that leap and explore new options. There are limitless options out there, and you can start looking at popular job boards like Indeed, Monster, or even Craigslist.

6. Rekindle an old friendship you lost

Is there someone in your life who you haven’t been able to keep in touch with? Perhaps it’s a friend from high school, or it may even be a family member. One of the biggest regrets people have at the end of their lives is leaving incomplete relationships that should have been fostered. Take that step today and rekindle an old friendship before it’s too late.

7. Commit to getting in shape

No amount of money or success is going to matter if your health isn’t optimal. Getting in shape should be your number one priority, because it’s the foundation that will not only help you become more successful, but enjoy your success once you get it.

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8. Develop that skill you’ve been putting off

Do you have a skill that you’ve been wanting to learn, but have been putting off? You may have been discouraged in the past because you weren’t picking it up fast enough. Try following some of these strategies to master a new skill faster.

9. Read one book every week/month

The more you learn, the more you earn. Kick-off the new year by committing to read one book per week (or per month if you know you can’t commit to one week).

10. Quit smoking

I recommend you read Allen Carr’s Easy Way to Stop Smoking. Published in 1985, this book has helped millions of people, including celebrities such as Ellen Degeneres, quit smoking after implementing the strategies outlined in the book.

11. Go 80%

Everyday we huff and puff, trying to squeeze in that extra minute, paragraph, or meeting. But if we can work smart, it’s completely possible to get 95% done by putting in 80% of the effort in, and avoiding the unnecessary stress. The key is to choose strategically what you want to be working on.

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12. Say ‘Hell Yeah’ or ‘No’

Derek Sivers has a famous saying of either saying ‘Hell Yeah’ or ‘No’. This means that unless you’re incredibly excited about a new opportunity and willing to give 100% of your effort, you should practice saying no. It will allow you to focus more of your time on what truly matters.

13. Give back through volunteering

We’re incredibly fortunate to have the lives we lead, no matter where you are right now. If you’re able to read this using a smartphone or a laptop, you’re more fortunate than the majority of the people around the world. Giving back through volunteering will not only give you perspective on how grateful we should be, but it will help you contribute to the community.

14. Become a digital nomad

The rise of digital nomads has arrived, and it’s here to stay. Check out The Top 20 Tools For Digital Nomads.

15. Review your goals every month (not every year!)

The most impactful New Year’s Resolution may be to actually review your resolutions more than once a year. You can make adjustments based on how far you’ve actually come, and you’ll feel more motivated by reviewing it every month (or even every week).

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Featured photo credit: Ava Sol via unsplash.com

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Sean Kim

Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

10 Websites to Learn Something New in 30 Minutes a Day When You Learn A Second Language, These 7 Amazing Things Will Happen To You 7 Science-Backed Learning Hacks to Help You Learn Anything Faster 7 Best Languages to Learn in Order to Stay Competitive 15 New Year’s Resolution Ideas to Make This Year Your Best Year

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Published on September 16, 2021

What Are Process Goals? (With Examples)

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What Are Process Goals? (With Examples)

Ready. Set. Go. For years, this was my three-step mindset when it came to goals. I would reach for the moon and hope to land among the stars without feeling the pain of the fall. This approach was all or nothing, and as a result, I experienced loads of burnout and almost zero productivity. In short, my task list was filled with high-level intentions, but I hadn’t taken the time to create a map to reach the destinations. I was lost in the planning stages because I didn’t understand process goals or have any examples to follow.

Since then, I’ve learned how to embrace the journey and break my outcome goals into smaller and more manageable process goals. This approach has improved my focus and reduced frustration because I’m now working towards a surefire strategy that will take me where I want to go––I’m creating a plan of action with achievable daily targets (a process goal).

What Is a Process Goal?

A process goal is not a destination, it’s the path you plan on taking to get there. For example, if you want to become better at writing, your process goal would be to post one blog article per week and learn from the feedback you receive. The destination is a monthly goal of 12 articles.

This distinction is important because it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that these types of goals are not all or nothing. Think about it. You’ve heard it said: it’s not about working hard but working smart.

Well, a process goal is an actionable target with what we call SMART criteria:

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  • Specific – The more detailed your goal, the better. For example, instead of “I want to be fit,” you would say, “I want to lose five pounds.” Make sure your goal is crystal clear.
  • Measurable – You need a way to measure progress and success, so it needs to be quantifiable. This is where you decide what “fit” actually means for you (more on this later).
  • Achievable – If your goal isn’t challenging, then it’s not going to be motivating. On the other hand, there must be a steeper mountain to climb if you want substantial results.
  • Realistic – “I want to run a marathon” is not practical for most people. Ensure you have the time, energy, and resources (e.g., training program) required to achieve your goal.
  • Time-Bound – Your goal needs an assigned deadline or it’s just a pipe dream. There’s nothing wrong with dreaming, but what happens when the fantasy ends?

To summarize, these are the essential components of any process goal: specific, measurable, achievable within a certain time frame, and realistic.

What Is a Destination Goal?

A destination goal is a point in time when you plan to be at a particular destination. For example, if your goal is to get to represent your country at the 2025 Summer Olympics, you right need to focus on smaller increments to attain that success. On your way to that goal, you need to focus on smaller destinations. First, make the national team. Then, compete in a few events and so forth.

If you try to make it to the Olympics from the very start without any milestones along the way, it would be too daunting. On the other hand, if you focus on each milestone as a destination goal, it will all seem possible and achievable.

Process Goal Template

Let’s say you want to become a better cook. Here is one way of writing the process goal: “I will save $100 per week by cooking all my meals at home for 12 weeks.” This would be your destination (monthly), and the steps required to achieve this goal (weekly) would be:

  1. Spend one hour on Sunday planning my meals for the week.
  2. Shop for groceries after work on Monday and Tuesday nights.
  3. Cook all meals at home on Wednesdays through Sundays.
  4. Pack my lunch for work on Mondays and Tuesdays.
  5. Save $100 per week in cash by cooking at home.

This process goal will help you become a better cook by teaching you to save money through planning, shopping, cooking, packing your own lunch, and trying new recipes. It also includes a weekly reward (saving $100 in cash) that will help you stay motivated.

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Process goals encourage you to reach your ultimate goals. When you feel like you can accomplish smaller goals along the way, you gain sustainability and confidence to move forward.

In many ways, process goals are a lot like faith. Each accomplishment brings you closer to seeing the fullness of the life that you desire––it breaks through the fog and makes things clearer.

What Questions Helped Me Find My Process Goals?

After several years of setting lofty goals and becoming increasingly frustrated when I wasn’t getting the results I wanted, I decided to take a closer look at my approach.

Now, there are many ways you can do this, but here’s how I went about it. Last year, I asked myself the following questions:

  • What am I doing right now?
  • How can I get better at this?
  • Is this process goal leading me closer to my ultimate goals?

The choices I made from the answers to these questions became my process goals. They were the driving force that kept me motivated and moving forward when I wanted to give up and throw in the towel. Since then, I’ve been able to accomplish lifelong goals that I had given up on years ago. For example, I’ve been able to obtain a publishing contract, create more digital products for my business, and enjoy the moment.

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Before I broke down my goals into smaller ones, I was struggling to just get out of bed. The thought of my endless list kept me stagnant. Now, I look forward to each morning and taking on smaller projects to reach profitable outcomes.

What Are Some Process Goals You Can Try?

So, now that you understand the importance of process goals, let’s get you started with some examples that you can utilize this week:

  • Sign up for a new class.
  • Complete one portion of your project by Thursday.
  • Start walking around the block instead of running a mile.
  • Improve your writing by spending 30 minutes everyday journaling.
  • Practice your interview skills.
  • Read at least one book from the library this week.
  • Do ten push-ups each day before you leave for work.

You get the idea. These process goals don’t have to be complicated. If anything, you want to break down your plans to the point of them feeling easy or at least doable without needing a week’s vacation. By breaking your goals down into smaller pieces, you can accomplish a lot more in a shorter period. You’ll also feel more confident that you’re able to accomplish something within the moment.

It isn’t easy to continue towards your goal if achievement feels too far away. You need to celebrate the small things and embrace the process.

What Do You Need for Process Goals?

Think about how much time and money you’ve spent on new clothes, books, technology, etc. Many of us want to keep up with the latest trends and purchase the best gadgets from Apple or Microsoft. But all of these extra investments come at a steep price.

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To find your process goals, you may have to face some difficult emotions or situations bravely and confront them head-on. You might need to forgo the new outfit or the latest Mac book to meet your overall objectives.[1] Remember, process goals not only protect you from feeling overwhelmed, but they also keep you from being distracted.

Final Thoughts

You may feel overwhelmed at first when trying to set a process goal. Sometimes, just thinking about change triggers stress hormones, which only leads to more worries and anxious feelings. However, if you keep yourself focused and take small steps in the right direction, you’ll soon realize that goals don’t have to be complicated.

You can achieve your process goals one day at a time, and you can start today by breaking down your larger goal into smaller steps. It doesn’t matter if the process takes a week or six months, what matters most is that you’re moving forward and doing something to make yourself better.

Now, go on out there and achieve one of your process goals!

Featured photo credit: Kaleidico via unsplash.com

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