Advertising
Advertising

Five Ways to eat More Organic Food

Five Ways to eat More Organic Food

vegetables-790022_960_720

    According to Forbes, about 88 percent of Americans are willing to pay more for organic foods. People are drawn to organic food for good reason, as studies show that it contains more nutrients than non-organic food. Still, eating more organic foods can be tricky. Following are five ways to help you.

    Advertising

    Too pricey? Rethink the list.

    A common reason that people have a hard time adopting more organic choices is because organic food is relatively pricey compared to non-organic food. A food activist got in trouble recently for suggesting that poor people eat less. She later apologized and refined her statement by saying that those who cannot afford organic food should pay attention to their shopping lists and eliminate unnecessary junk. Focus on fruits, vegetables, and bulk foods such as beans. Bulk foods are a great way to reduce the cost of food while still providing healthy meals for the family.

    Consider more home-cooked meals.

    Buying organic means buying fresh fruits and vegetables. It also means buying fewer prepared meals or frozen meals.

    Advertising

    Generations of people have forgotten how to cook or have limited food-preparation skills. If one does not know how to cook, recipes can be found on the internet that can be as simple as smashing an organic avocado and mixing in tomatoes, vinegar, oil, and seasonings to make a dip. Potatoes are a good, bulky food which is versatile and relatively cheap, even when organic. One can easily make mashed potatoes or baked potatoes. These are just a couple of ideas.

    Make kid-friendly organic meals.

    Some families attempting to make the switch will have to deal with a backlash from the smaller mouths in the family. Kids can be quite picky when it comes to food. It might be wise to start with small changes instead of changing their entire diet all at once. This could be done by simply using normal bread and peanut butter but adding organic, raw honey.

    Advertising

    You can slowly introduce sprouted bread and organic peanut butter when the kids get used to the initial change. Another good way to introduce organic foods to kids is to give them treats. One great idea is to freeze three organic, sliced bananas. Place them in a blender with two spoonsful of honey and two tablespoons of milk. Blend the mixture and give your kids organic “ice cream”. The key is to let your children see that organic food can be delicious.

    Join a neighborhood co-op.

    Organic fruits and vegetables do not last as long as non-organic ones which means that you may have to shop more often. One solution to this is joining a neighborhood co-op. A co-op allows you to buy a share in the grocery store which means that you will qualify for great discounts that you can use to buy items in bulk rather than in small batches.

    Advertising

    It might also be a good idea to learn how to preserve foods. A lot of people have to go shopping frequently because some foods go bad before they are eaten. You can solve this by learning how to ferment vegetables and make jams out of fruits.

    Have it delivered to your door.

    If you don’t have time to go to the store, you might want to have organic food delivered to your door. This will avoid a trip to the store and save money on gas. Buying online can provide more options that you might not be able to find locally. Major grocery stores are making the switch easier, but it has not fully integrated, making it hard for some people to find what they want. You can also have food delivered to your door with an organic meal delivery service.

    Hopefully, these tips can help you eat organic foods more often. You can start by deciding on the options that fit best with your current situation and lifestyle.

    Featured photo credit: https://static.pexels.com/photos/220911/pexels-photo-220911.jpeg via static.pexels.com

    More by this author

    3 Ways to Monitor Your Health From Home Go The Extra Mile… Literally 5 Tips to Handle the “Heat” of the Kitchen depression Six Ways To Alleviate Depression 5 Things To Do To Prepare Your House To Sell

    Trending in Fitness

    1 When is the Best Time to Workout to Get Incredible Results 2 10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail 3 The Best Fitness Plan for You Based on Your Body Type 4 17 Morning Stretches That Will Jumpstart Your Body and Mind 5 How to Gain Muscle Fast (The Healthy And Natural Way)

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on December 2, 2018

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

    The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

    Advertising

    The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

    Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

    Advertising

    Review Your Past Flow

    Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

    Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

    Advertising

    Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

    Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

    Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

    Advertising

    Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

    Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

    We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

    Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

      Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

      Read Next