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9 Ways To Share Big Files For Free

9 Ways To Share Big Files For Free

If you’ve ever tried to send large files via email, you know it can be problematic because of file-size limitations. Meanwhile, some file-sharing services put a size limit on the file being transferred, making it impossible to share a movie clip with friends or present a sample of your work to a client. And still others require you to sign up for an account, which can be a hassle.

Here’s a roundup of web-based file-sharing sites that allow you to share large files for free without having to sign up for an account.

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1.Share By Link

Share By Link offers free, unlimited file sharing and supports large files up to 2GB. No sign up is required, making it very user-friendly.

It offers the security of https, which means that the data transferred will be encrypted and secure. Share By Link works on mobile and tablet devices. If you’re computer savvy and have your own web hosting account, you can set up your own server and keep the files on your own system.

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2. SendBigFiles

This web service allows you to send up to 50MB of data without signing up – but you will have to sign up if you want to send larger files. Your data is sent via email, which means you’ll need to input your own email address, as well as that of your recipient. It also offers an option to include a subject and message. SendBigFiles also offers premium and business plans.

3. Transfer Big Files

Transfer Big Files allows users to send files up to 30MB for free. It allows users to view and manage their transfer history. Each file is limited to 5 downloads and the service is ad-supported. Custom branding options are available for business plans.

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4. DropSend

DropSend offers a web-based interface that allows you to send a maximum of 5 files per month with 4GB file support. If you want to send larger files or send files more often you’ll have to upgrade to the Basic plan at $5 a month. It’s available with 256-bit AES security. The company also offers enterprise plans for businesses.

5. WeTransfer

This intuitive web-based file-sharing service lets users transfer 2GB at a time. No signup is required. The data is sent via e-mail and you’ll need to input both your own and your recipient’s e-mail address. Users can upgrade to the $12 monthly plan which allows you to transfer up to 20GB at a time, view your transfer history and password-protect files. The free version of WeTransfer is ad supported.

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6. Zip Share

Zip Share offers the ability to add files from your computer or from a cloud such as Dropbox, Google Drive or OneDrive. Premium members are able to password-protect their files. It also provides the option of sharing on social media acounts including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, in addition to just e-mail. Users with free accounts can send large files up to 500MB. Users with a pro account can send up to 5GB per file with no expiration date.

7. Filemail

Filemail’s free account allows you to send up to 30GB for free with delivery tracking and FTP downloads. The pro plan offers an unlimited maximum size and keeps the file available for 30 days. A business plan is available, which includes the ability to integrate filemail on your server and offers https support.

8. MailBigFile

MailBigFile allows you to send up to 2GB for free and will keep the file available for 10 days, A maximum of 20 downloads are allowed per file. The pro version allows you to send files up to 4GB. MailBigFile has several business plans available which offer file tracking, custom branding and password protection.

9. SendTransfer

SendTransfer allows you to transfer big files up to 10GB. You can upload multiple files at a time to be transferred. In order to send the files, simply enter the recipients e-mail address and your own. The link automatically expires after 7 days.

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Jacqueline Cao

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Last Updated on October 15, 2019

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

We are all about doing things faster and better around here at Lifehack. And part of doing things faster and better is having a solid personal productivity system that you use on a daily basis.

This system can be just about anything that helps you get through your mountain of projects or tasks, and helps you get closer to your goals in life. Whether it’s paper or pixels, it doesn’t really matter. But, since you are reading Lifehack I have to assume that pixels and technological devices are an important part of your workflow.

“Personal Productivity System” defined

A personal productivity system (at least the definition that this article will use) is a set of workflows and tools that allow an individual to optimally get their work done.

Workflows can be how you import and handle your photos from your camera, how you write and create blog posts, how you deploy compiled code to a server, etc.

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Tools are the things like planners, todo managers, calendars, development environments, applications, etc.

When automation is bad

You may be thinking that the more that we automate our systems, the more we will get done. This is mostly the case, but there is one very big “gotcha” when it comes to automation of anything.

Automation is a bad thing for your personal productivity system when you don’t inherently understand the process of something.

Let’s take paying your bills for example. This may seem very obvious, but if you can’t stick to a monthly budget and have trouble finding the money to make payments on time, then automating your bill payment every month is completely useless and can be dangerous for your personal finances.

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Another example is using a productivity tool to “tell you” what tasks are important and what to do next. If you haven’t taken a step back and figured out just how your productivity systems should work together, this type of automation will likely keep you from getting things done.

You can only automate something in your personal productivity system that have managed for a while. If you try to automate things that aren’t managed well already, you will probably feel a bit out of control and have a greater sense of overwhelm.

Another thing to remember is that some things should always be done by yourself, like responding to important emails and communicating with others. Automating these things can show your coworkers and colleagues that you don’t care enough to communicate yourself.

When automation is good

On the other hand, automation is a great thing for your personal productivity system when you understand the process of something and can then automatically get the steps done. When you know how to manage something effectively and understand the step-by-step process of a portion of your system, it’s probably a great time to automate it.

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I have several workflows that I have introduced in the last year that takes some of the “mindless” work from me so I can be more creative and not have to worry about the details of something.

On my Mac I use a combination of Automator workflows, TextExpander snippets, and now Keyboard Maestro shortcuts to do things like automatically touch-up photos imported from my iPhone 4S or open all the apps and websites needed for a weekly meeting to the forefront of my desktop by typing a few keys. Once you open yourself up to automating a few of your processes, you start to see other pieces of your system that can benefit from automation.

Once again; none of this works unless you understand your processes and know what tools you can use to get them done automatically.

The three steps to determine if something is “ripe” for automation

If your workflow passes these three steps, then automate away, baby:

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  1. You can do this process in your sleep and it doesn’t require your full, if any form of attention. It can (and has been) managed in some form prior to automating it.
  2. The process is time consuming.
  3. The process doesn’t require “human finesse” (ie. communicating and responding to something personally)

Automating your personal productivity systems can be a great for you in the long run if you are careful and mindful of what you are doing. You first need to understand the processes that you are trying to automate before automating them though. Don’t get stuck in thinking that anything and everything should be automated in your life, because it probably shouldn’t.

Pick and choose these processes wisely and you’ll find the ones that take up most of your time to be the best ones to automate. What have you automated in your personal productivity system?

Featured photo credit: Bram Naus via unsplash.com

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