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9 Ways To Share Big Files For Free

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9 Ways To Share Big Files For Free

If you’ve ever tried to send large files via email, you know it can be problematic because of file-size limitations. Meanwhile, some file-sharing services put a size limit on the file being transferred, making it impossible to share a movie clip with friends or present a sample of your work to a client. And still others require you to sign up for an account, which can be a hassle.

Here’s a roundup of web-based file-sharing sites that allow you to share large files for free without having to sign up for an account.

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1.Share By Link

Share By Link offers free, unlimited file sharing and supports large files up to 2GB. No sign up is required, making it very user-friendly.

It offers the security of https, which means that the data transferred will be encrypted and secure. Share By Link works on mobile and tablet devices. If you’re computer savvy and have your own web hosting account, you can set up your own server and keep the files on your own system.

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2. SendBigFiles

This web service allows you to send up to 50MB of data without signing up – but you will have to sign up if you want to send larger files. Your data is sent via email, which means you’ll need to input your own email address, as well as that of your recipient. It also offers an option to include a subject and message. SendBigFiles also offers premium and business plans.

3. Transfer Big Files

Transfer Big Files allows users to send files up to 30MB for free. It allows users to view and manage their transfer history. Each file is limited to 5 downloads and the service is ad-supported. Custom branding options are available for business plans.

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4. DropSend

DropSend offers a web-based interface that allows you to send a maximum of 5 files per month with 4GB file support. If you want to send larger files or send files more often you’ll have to upgrade to the Basic plan at $5 a month. It’s available with 256-bit AES security. The company also offers enterprise plans for businesses.

5. WeTransfer

This intuitive web-based file-sharing service lets users transfer 2GB at a time. No signup is required. The data is sent via e-mail and you’ll need to input both your own and your recipient’s e-mail address. Users can upgrade to the $12 monthly plan which allows you to transfer up to 20GB at a time, view your transfer history and password-protect files. The free version of WeTransfer is ad supported.

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6. Zip Share

Zip Share offers the ability to add files from your computer or from a cloud such as Dropbox, Google Drive or OneDrive. Premium members are able to password-protect their files. It also provides the option of sharing on social media acounts including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, in addition to just e-mail. Users with free accounts can send large files up to 500MB. Users with a pro account can send up to 5GB per file with no expiration date.

7. Filemail

Filemail’s free account allows you to send up to 30GB for free with delivery tracking and FTP downloads. The pro plan offers an unlimited maximum size and keeps the file available for 30 days. A business plan is available, which includes the ability to integrate filemail on your server and offers https support.

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8. MailBigFile

MailBigFile allows you to send up to 2GB for free and will keep the file available for 10 days, A maximum of 20 downloads are allowed per file. The pro version allows you to send files up to 4GB. MailBigFile has several business plans available which offer file tracking, custom branding and password protection.

9. SendTransfer

SendTransfer allows you to transfer big files up to 10GB. You can upload multiple files at a time to be transferred. In order to send the files, simply enter the recipients e-mail address and your own. The link automatically expires after 7 days.

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Jacqueline Cao

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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