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How to Choose the Best Personal Injury Lawyer for Your Case

How to Choose the Best Personal Injury Lawyer for Your Case

So, you’ve been injured in an accident, and someone else could be responsible. You know you have a case, but you aren’t sure you should manage the fight alone. That means you need a lawyer. But how do you choose the right attorney for your case?

If you want to find the best personal injury lawyer for your case, follow these simple steps.

1. Do Your Research

Step one for finding the right personal injury lawyers for your case is to do your research. First, you want to identify attorneys working in your local area that specialize in personal injury cases. Most law offices focus on specific subsections of the law referred to as specialties. To ensure you get the most capable representation, it is ideal to choose an attorney with a thorough understanding of the case law involved.

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Next, you need to research any local personal injury firms that you have identified. Check out what is listed on their business websites, and check review websites for feedback from previous clients. The reason you need to complete this kind of research is to narrow down your current options. Large cities have a wide selection of attorneys from which to choose, and it isn’t feasible to contact everyone on the list. Your research will help determine who you should call, and who you should pass over.

2. Make the Calls and Schedule Consultations

Now that you have a list narrowed down, it is time to make some phone calls. Your initial inquiry should focus on discovering details regarding the firm’s consultation services. Many law firms offer free consultations to potential new clients, but that isn’t necessarily the standard. During your call, you need to determine whether the cost associated (if any) is reasonable based on your needs.

If you decide that the fee is manageable, or find out the consultation is free, schedule an appointment. Once the appointment is made, move on to the next law office on your list. Repeat until you have covered every attorney on your list.

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It is better to schedule several consultations so you can get different perspectives regarding your case.

3. Prepare for the Consultations

Before heading to any appointments, gather up any pertinent information regarding your case. This can include accident reports, medical records, police statements, photographs, and any other demonstrative evidence that helps support your case. By collecting everything in advance, you are prepared to provide any information that is currently available to assist the personal injury lawyer during the discussion.

You also need to create a list of standard questions for the attorneys. This should include questions about any fees or hourly rates, what services they are willing to provide, and what will be expected of you as things progress.

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4. Attend the Consultation Meetings

When your appointment times arrive, bring your prepared information and list of questions to review with the attorney. Make sure to bring extra paper and a pen to take notes as your questions are answered, and the information is reviewed. After each appointment, gather your notes and keep them in a safe place.

Regardless of the success of your first appointment, it is important to attend every consultation you have scheduled. That way, you can compare the costs and services offered to make the ideal selection for your case.

Compare Your Options

After all of your consultations are complete, bring out your notes and compare. Choose the attorney that meets your financial requirements and that inspires confidence in their abilities. Ultimately, they will work closely with you throughout the case, so you need to make sure that all expectations are well aligned and that the financial component is manageable based on your current situation.

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Once you have identified your top choice from the list of personal injury lawyers, make the call and secure their services. Then you can go forward with your case knowing you have made the best selection for you.

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Published on June 30, 2020

What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

Many conversations are being held nowadays regarding unconscious bias, but what does it really mean and how can it affect your life and the people around you? With many types of biases, it can get quite confusing. In this article, we’ll touch on cognitive bias, and then zero in on unconscious bias. Both types of biases have an immediate impact on your life because they relate to how you and others think about yourself and other people.

If you want to protect your relationships and make good decisions about other people, you need to know what these biases mean[1]. Once we have clarity about that, we can explore in more depth unconscious bias and how to address it[2].

Cognitive Bias

Let’s start with cognitive bias[3], a predictable pattern of mental errors that result in us misperceiving reality and, as a result, deviating away from the most likely way of reaching our goals[4].

These mental blind spots impact all areas of our life, from health to relationships and even shopping, as a study recently revealed[5]. In other words, from the perspective of what is best for us as individuals, falling for a cognitive bias always harms us by lowering our probability of getting what we want.

Cognitive biases have to do with judgment, not mood. Ironically, cognitive biases — such as the optimism bias and overconfidence effect — more often lead to positive moods. Of course, the consequence of falling into cognitive biases, once discovered, usually leaves us in a bad mood due to the disastrous results of these dangerous judgment errors.

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Unconscious Bias

Unconscious bias is different from cognitive bias. Also known as implicit bias, it refers to unconscious forms of discrimination and stereotyping based on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, ability, age, and so on[6]. Despite cognitive biases sometimes leading to discriminatory thinking and feeling patterns, these are two separate and distinct concepts.

Cognitive biases are common across humankind and relate to the particular wiring of our brains, while unconscious bias relates to perceptions between different groups and are specific for the society in which we live. For example, I bet you don’t care or even think about whether someone is a noble or a commoner, yet that distinction was fundamentally important a few centuries ago across Europe. To take another example, most people in the US don’t have strong feelings about Sunni vs. Shiite Muslims, yet this distinction is incredibly meaningful in many parts of the world.

Unconscious Bias and Discriminatory Behavior

Organizations often bring me in as a speaker on diversity and inclusion to address potential unconscious discriminatory behavior. When I share in speeches that black Americans suffer from police harassment and violence at a much higher rate than white people, some participants (usually white) occasionally try to defend the police by claiming that black people are more violent and likely to break the law than whites. They thus attribute police harassment to the internal characteristics of black people (implying that it is deserved), and not to the external context of police behavior.

In reality – as I point out in my response to these folks – research shows that black people are harassed and harmed by police at a much higher rate for the same kind of activity. A white person walking by a cop, for example, is statistically much less likely to be stopped and frisked than a black one[7].

At the other end of things, a white person resisting arrest is much less likely to be violently beaten than a black one. In other words, statistics show that the higher rate of harassment and violence against black Americans by police is due to the prejudice of the police officers, at least to a large extent[8].

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However, I am careful to clarify that this discrimination is not necessarily intentional. Sometimes, it indeed is deliberate, with white police officers consciously believing that black Americans deserve much more scrutiny than whites. At other times, the discriminatory behavior results from unconscious, implicit thought processes that the police officer would not consciously endorse[9].

After becoming aware that unconscious bias does exist, the next step would be learning how to recognize it in order to reduce it. I’ve outlined three crucial points to keep in mind below while further exploring the unconscious prejudice discussed above.

How to Reduce Unconscious Bias

Remember these three important points if you want to work on reducing your unconscious bias.

1. Unconscious Bias is a Systemic Issue

When we understand that unconscious bias is ultimately a systemic issue, we understand that internal cultures need to be checked and addressed first.

Interestingly, research shows that many black police officers have an unconscious prejudice against other black people, perceiving them in a more negative light than white people when evaluating potential suspects. This unconscious bias carried by many — not all — black police officers helps show that such prejudices come – at least to a significant extent – from internal cultures within police departments, rather than pre-existing racist attitudes present before someone joins a police department.

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Such cultures are perpetuated by internal norms, policies, and training procedures, and any police department wishing to address unconscious bias needs to address internal culture first and foremost, rather than attributing racism to individual officers.

In other words, instead of saying it’s a few bad apples in a barrel of overall good ones, the key is recognizing that unconscious bias is a systemic issue, and the structure and joints of the barrel needs to be fixed[10].

2. There Is No Shame in Unconscious Bias

Another crucial thing that needs to be highlighted is that there is no shame or blame in unconscious bias as it’s not stemming from any fault in the individual. This no-shame approach decreases the fight, freeze, or flight defensive response among reluctant audiences, helping them hear and accept the issue.

Unconscious bias is prevalent and often doesn’t match our conscious values. Everyone holds unconscious beliefs and prejudices stemming from our tendency to categorize people into social groups. This developed naturally as a way for our ancestors to quickly size up a possible threat. Unfortunately, it doesn’t translate well in modern life.

3. It Takes a Sustained Effort to Prevent and Protect Against Unconscious Bias

After being presented with additional statistics and discussion of unconscious bias, the issue is generally settled. Still, from their subsequent behavior it’s clear that some of these audience members don’t immediately internalize this evidence. It’s much more comforting for their gut reactions to believe that police officers are right and anyone targeted by police deserves it; in turn, they are highly reluctant to accept the need to focus more efforts and energy on protecting black Americans from police violence due to the structural challenges facing these groups.

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The issue of unconscious bias doesn’t match their intuitions, so they reject this concept, despite extensive and strong evidence for its pervasive role in policing. It takes a series of subsequent follow-up conversations and interventions to move the needle. A single training is almost never sufficient, both in my experience and according to research[11].

Conclusion

The examples and points raised illustrate broader patterns you need to follow to recognize unconscious bias. Only by doing so will you be able to determine if, and what type of, intervention is needed to address it.

Unfortunately, our gut reactions lead us to make poor judgment choices when we simply follow our intuitions. Unconscious biases are systemic and need to be addressed in order to make the best decisions[12].

We need to learn about the kind of problems that result from unconscious bias. Then, you need to develop the right mental habits to help you make the best choices[13]. A one-time training is insufficient for doing so. It takes a long-term commitment and constant discipline and efforts to overcome unconscious bias, so get started now.

More Tips on Overcoming Unconscious Bias

Featured photo credit: M.T ElGassier via unsplash.com

Reference

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