Advertising
Advertising

Five Travel Hacks To Save Money in Latin America

Five Travel Hacks To Save Money in Latin America

The Internet isn’t short of money-saving travel tips, but unfortunately some of them just aren’t feasible for long-term travel. One of the joys of long-term travel is the flexibility it affords you: no one wants to be boxed in by booking a bus two months in advance or having to stake plans around being in a certain city at a certain time to stay in that budget hotel you booked – no matter how much it might save you.

If you suck at math and the idea of doing a budget tracking spreadsheet every night is your idea of a nightmare (even with all those new budget tracking apps),[1] fear not. There are several travel tips that are workable and easy to utilise, and really will save you money. Here are five ways to save money in Latin America – by someone who’s been there and done that – but didn’t buy the T-shirt.

1. Always Take the Chicken Bus

If you have a long, arduous journey in front of you, it’s incredibly tempting to pay that bit extra for a swankier bus service or shuttle. But travel on the local buses (or chicken buses) and you can save inordinate amounts of money. Sometimes the price difference for shuttles can be up to ten times what you’d pay on local transportation. Chicken buses may not be fast or luxurious, but they’ll get you from A to B for under a dollar, and have the added benefit of giving you an authentic experience too.

Advertising

2. Skip the Tours and Hire Bikes Instead

Now admittedly, there are places and attractions you can only visit with an organised tour group. But do your research, because forking out $60 for an overpriced tour aimed at tourists isn’t always your best bet.

For example, exploring Luna Valley in Chile’s San Pedro de Atacama desert is a must for anyone on the backpacker trail – but because you’re in a traveler hotspot in one of South America’s most expensive countries, your time in this little town could become a budget breaker. Skip the tours of the valley that cost a lot and hire bikes to explore instead. Not only will you save money, but you’ll also get away from the crowds, be able to do it on your own time AND you’ll get some exercise – a rarity for a long-term traveller.

3. Eat at Menu del Dia Restaurants

After a few months on the road, the thing I found I missed most was the availability of international food. When you finally hit up a big, developed city and see international restaurants, it’s almost impossible to stop your brain conjuring up images of your next meal possibilities: Fresh bowls of Vietnamese pho! Aromatic Indian curries with soft nan bread! Fragrant Pad Thai and succulent dumplings! I know, I know. While it can be hard not to run to the nearest restaurant, don’t. Gringo food comes with gringo prices, and you can easily spend what amounts to a day’s budget on a quick meal.

Advertising

Instead, head to the local restaurants where you can choose from the ‘menu del dia’ and enjoy a two- or three-course meal for around $2. There’s soups, salads, pastas, fish, meat, rice and beans… You’ll leave full to burst and with plenty of change in your pocket. Save the international food for when you’re back home – or for a very special treat.

4. Cook in Hostels (And Make Tupperware Your Friend)

It goes without saying that if you’re on a budget you should try to stay in hostels with kitchens. These are invaluable for your budget, so where possible, always choose accommodation where you can prepare you own food. But, even if you have accommodation with a kitchen, after a while hostel cooking gets incredibly monotonous. And that’s skipping over whether your hostel will actually have any cooking equipment bar one bent, sticky frying pan and a few blunt knives.

If you’re lucky, the hostel might have salt and pepper left from a previous traveler. But actual spices and herbs – basil, chilli, paprika, basil, oregano – are usually out of the question. It may not seem like a big deal, but having your own mini spice rack on hand can be invaluable. After more than a month of flavorless rice and beans or bland, overcooked pasta, you will likely lose all faith in hostel cooking. THIS is the crucial point when you think to heck with it: I’m heading to the nearest international restaurant and scoffing myself silly. I deserve it.

Advertising

You do, but there’s no faster way to fritter your budget away than on food. Fresh herbs and spices are expensive in Latin America – sometimes unbelievably so. I began compiling collected spices, herbs and condiments (collect ALL the sachets in restaurants when you can!) in a little tupperware box. Then whenever I was cooking what would be a bland and uninspired meal, I had a wealth of spices and flavors to put in. Need some spice? Fine. Garlic? Whack it in. Such a small thing to do with such a big return.

5. Plan Your Flights Properly

Point one might suggest always getting the chicken bus, but admittedly, that doesn’t always work. It’s fine for Central America, but South America is so vast it just isn’t always feasible. If you’re heading to far flung places like Patagonia, flying is often the only real choice, unless you know you can spend five days on a bus without going insane (I can’t). If you know you’re going to have to book a flight, plan this in advance.

No matter how cheap an airline is, don’t make the mistake of heading directly to their site to see the best deals (which so many travelers still do…) In my experience the best flight comparison site is usually Google flights, but Skyskanner also advises you on the cheapest times to book a flight. November is 12% cheaper, and December is 20% more expensive, so booking just a week or two earlier can save you a lot.

Advertising

Do you have any travel hacks for Latin America?

Featured photo credit: Ihor Malytskyi via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Ella Jameson

Freelance writer

Travel Hacks To Stay Safe While Backpacking Five Travel Hacks To Save Money in Latin America

Trending in Lifestyle

1 7 Best Probiotic Supplements (Recommendation & Reviews) 2 Signs of a Nervous Breakdown (And How to Survive It) 3 7 Best Weight Loss Supplements That Are Healthy and Effective 4 8 Beginner Yoga Tips for Just About Anyone 5 13 Most Common Muscle Building Mistakes to Avoid

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next