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5 Steps To Deal With Workplace Discrimination

5 Steps To Deal With Workplace Discrimination

Your job is probably not the funnest part of your day on any normal day, but if you’re experiencing workplace discrimination on top of it, you’re probably in a uniquely uncomfortable and miserable experience. After all, who wants to raise trouble with the people who give you a paycheck? How much do you have to weigh the risk of unfair retaliation versus the need to speak up?

The anxiety of disrupting the flow of your place of employment pitted against allowing your rights to be trampled can be overwhelming for many people. Luckily, many laws exist to protect against such bigotry. Here are five steps to take to deal with workplace discrimination.

Document everything

As soon as you believe you may be experiencing discrimination, begin documenting notable events.[1] This is crucial to identifying any trends you believe you are experiencing and to proving your case when you are asked to (and you will be asked to). You will likely need a combination of direct and circumstantial evidence in order to make your case, as you will be unlikely to get enough direct evidence of any discrimination from most people.

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Documentation includes saving or keeping a record of any rude or discriminatory texts, emails, memos, or conversations, and noting when and where they occurred, as well as between who. This should be kept somewhere safe, secure, and private rather than shown to multiple people.

Educate yourself on your legal rights

Once you have documented evidence of an observable trend of discrimination from a coworker or employer, begin educating yourself on your rights. Different states will have different rules regarding an employer’s right to fire employees, but all states are protected by the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ensures that employees cannot be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, nationality, sex, or religion. Subsequent acts also federally protect against ageism and disabilities without an attempt at reasonable accommodations.

However, businesses with less than 15 employees have exemptions.[2] You need to be aware of what your company’s size is as you search your legal rights, since smaller employers are often exempt from discrimination laws.

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Speak to a supervisor

Whether formally or informally, you need to make a supervisor in your company aware that you feel discrimination is taking place. This can be in a conversation with your boss, or it can be in a meeting with your company’s Human Resources representative. Your company will not take action until you directly ask them to.

In the conversation you must convey that you believe you are experiencing discrimination, not just uncomfortable or in a dispute with a co-worker. Make sure the company understands you believe your rights are being violated and ask for a follow-up, or for the company to take steps to address your claims.

File an official report

If a conversation with a supervisor does not prove fruitful, you will want to file an official report of discrimination with the company’s HR department. In this report you must include all evidence, circumstantial or direct, of discrimination to your company who should evaluate it according to their own procedures. Ask them to investigate your complaint and provide a written report following the evaluation.

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If the report decides to dismiss your claim or you are unable to file an official report outright, you should consider turning to federal options for protection, including contacting the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and file your grievance with the government.

Seek legal counsel

If your employer will not help you in your discrimination case or is the source of discrimination, you can turn to legal counsel to receive legal compensation in court from your company, including back pay, front pay, lost benefits, emotional distress, or punitive damages. An attorney may specialize in a field, such as disability discrimination[3], which might be more pertinent to your case. An attorney can also explain your state’s employment and discrimination laws to you and help you decide what path to take to address your discrimination complaints, whether it includes a lawsuit or not.

Your workplace shouldn’t be a place of harassment, bigotry, or discrimination. If you think you’re experiencing that at your job, consider looking into your options for addressing workplace discrimination to bring an end to unfair treatment.

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Featured photo credit: Getty Images via thebalance.com

Reference

[1] http://smallbusiness.chron.com/discriminated-against-workplace-16173.html
[2] http://employment.findlaw.com/employment-discrimination/dealing-with-discrimination-tips-for-employees.html
[3] http://summitdisabilitylawgroup.com/salt-lake/

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Last Updated on October 6, 2020

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

And if you want to know the difference between an arrogant person and a confident person, watch this video first:

 

1. They don’t make excuses.

Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy at work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses like “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

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2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone, because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort, because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

4. They don’t put things off until next week.

Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today – because that’s where progress happens.

5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

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6. They don’t judge people.

Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

8. They don’t make comparisons.

Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

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10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their life, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like a detective, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

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14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to Plan A. They make use of any and all weapons that are at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach, until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

15. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth” without thinking about it.

Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so”. They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives, and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

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