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4 Reasons Why Your Workouts Aren’t Working

4 Reasons Why Your Workouts Aren’t Working

You’ve been working out for months and yet, when you step on a scale—the numbers looking back at you are not the ones you wanted them to be! You look into the mirror but you still don’t see the type of body you have been working tirelessly for. Needless to say, your workout is simply not working out.

In all honesty, this scenario is not something new. It is quite common for some people who spend time at the gym to actually experience this.

While there is no universal or specific solution to this dilemma, the culprit of your problem may be one of the things listed below. Find out which one it may be and see if you can make a slight change to see the major change you’ve been longing for.

1. You’re not working out enough.

Sure, you are working out. But you might only be working out twice a month or as much as once a week!

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And you wonder why things aren’t changing? Obviously, you are not working out enough. Or maybe you are working out frequently but with the same intensity again and again without ever changing your workout routine.

That’s also not going to work!

To be able to see changes in your body, it needs to be challenged from time to time. Perhaps, you’ve even been working out consistently but not challenging yourself enough to deliver the right results.

If you are new to working out, you may want to work out 3-4 times a week, which is 3-4 hours of physical exercise per week, if you really want to see some evident results. And to avoid getting used to your usual workouts, it is best to change your workout routine as well as its intensity from time to time.

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2. You’re working out too much.

Quite the opposite of those who don’t work out enough are those who spend way too much time in the gym.

Yes, there is such thing as over-working-out.

If you are the type of person who works out so much that your calendar has no room for rest days—this might be the problem. A common misconception is that if you work out super hard, you’re going to see your expected results quickly. But this may not be the case since working out too hard might just be straining and breaking your muscles instead of actually building them. Adding a power shake to your post-workout routine will help your body recover and get recharged for your next session. There are also many proven vitamins and supplements that you can look into that are sure to accelerate muscle renewal. Never forget to rest because resting also means gaining the strength you need in order to survive the rest of your routines.

3. Your workout routine is wrong.

The idea of “working out” may already be enough for you. But in reality, there are certain routines that have a lot more of an impact than others. This is an important aspect to consider if you really want to see results.

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Understandably, your workout routine should be in accordance with the results you want to achieve. If you’re lifting, make sure you’re lifting the right weights.

Want to bulk up? Add more weight.

This may require you to talk to a workout routine expert to find out which exercises are best for you. It is also important to change up your routine from time to time.  There are a lot of fun and unique ways to switch up your workout routine. Drop the weights and get moving with a Zumba class or try indoor biking, the options to break a sweat in the gym are plentiful.

4. Your diet is wrong.

People can work out for days and still not see changes if they are eating the wrong foods. If you are trying to lose weight, working out will never be enough. A change in your diet must be done—that is, eating more natural and whole foods while avoiding the junk. Fruits, vegetables, healthy fats and increasing protein intake will definitely aid your workout. You should also avoid overeating. More so, you should not be rewarding yourself with a heavy meal after every workout.

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It’s also best if you divide your food into smaller portions throughout the day. That being said, snacking will help you avoid overeating during meals.

Don’t worry if you aren’t seeing major changes yet—it’s never too late. You can always adjust your routines and diet in order to see what’s best for your body. Remember, getting fit is not something you can just do in a snap of a finger, it takes a lot of planning, scheduling and dieting. And if you do some tweaking in the things mentioned above, your workout will, most likely, finally work for you.

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Sara Jane Adkins

Blogger at Natural Healthy Living

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Published on June 7, 2019

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

Having a hard time going to the gym? Fear no more!

In this article, we’ll be breaking down 10 in home lower body workouts anyone can try at home and their exercises. No gear needed for these workouts, just some space and a cup water waiting for your disposal.

There’re 3 main parts in this article:

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just get into the first section 10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere right away.

If you want more guidance on the basics, check out the second section Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

And the last section is about what you should do before and after working out.

10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just read on this section.

If you’d like to have more guidance on each exercise listed in these 10 workouts, take a look at the following part Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

1. The Starter Workout

3 sets of 8-12 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 2 min rest in between each set)

2. The 7 Minute Workout

3 rounds of 30 seconds of each exercise:

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  • Walking Lunges
  • Quarter Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(1 min rest in between each round)

3. The Unilateral Workout

4 sets of 16 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunges
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Skater Squat
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 1 min rest in between each set)

4. The Endurance Workout

2 sets of 20-50 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(1-2 min rest in between each set)

5. The Back To Back Lower Body Workout

5 rounds of 10 to 20 seconds of each exercise:

  • Skater Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(30 min rest in between each round)

6. Strength Lower Body Workout

5 to 10 sets of 4 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Squat

(30 sec to 2 mins of rest time in between set)

7. Glute Burner Workout

4 sets of 10-30 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(1 min of rest time in between set)

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8. The Advance Lower Body Workout

3 rounds of 20 seconds of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Skater Squat
  • Reverse Lunge
  • Glute Bridge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(2 mins of rest time in between set)

9. The Quick Lower Body Workout

2 sets of 10 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunge
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

10. The 100 Repetition Challenge

2 sets of 50 reps on each leg of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(4 mins of rest time in between set)

Lower Body Exercises Breakdown

Here’s the breakdown of the lower body exercises[1] that you found in the workouts listed in the first section of this article.

1. Squat

    A squat is a compound movement which entails the recruitment of a majority of your lower body (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, spinal erectors).

    How to squat:

    Feet shoulder width apart or a little wider. Toes pointed slightly out, arms out in front of you. Sit into your heels till you hit parallel with your butt and knee, drive through the heels, return to starting position and repeat.

    2. Walking Lunges

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      A lunge is a complex movement which recruits mainly the lower body.

      The walking lunges are a harder version of a split squat which is stationary and then adds the component of stepping and keeping balance which engages the gluteus medius as well as allowing a larger range of motion.

      3. Reverse Lunge

        A reverse lunge is very similar to the split squat but instead, after every rep, you are returning to the starting position and stepping back.

        By reverse stepping, you are allowing for a better emphasis on the hamstrings and gluteal muscles as opposed to the quadriceps muscles in a forward stepping lunge.

        4. Quarter Squat

          A quarter squat is the top ¼ movement of a squat. This will work mainly the gluteal muscles as it emphasizes the hip extension and not a lot of range of motion on the quadriceps muscles.

          5. Skater Squat

            A skater squat is a unilateral variation of the squat, this squat really engages the gluteus medius and hamstrings as it works unilateral stability and hip flexion which fires both the hamstrings and glutes.

            6. Step Up

              The Step Up is the greatest balance of getting the glutes and quadriceps muscles firing. Doing Step Ups will not only get the glutes going, but the quadriceps as well.

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              7. Glute Bridge

                Glute Bridges are a great way to nearly isolate the glutes and build a great butt. This entire movement works through hip extension which the main movement of the gluteal muscles.

                8. Single Leg Glute Bridge

                  Single leg glute bridge ensures that we are evenly building the glutes and not relying too heavily on our dominant leg and symmetrical butt. The step up can be done in a chair or a step in the stairs

                  9. Single Leg Deadlift

                    Single Leg RDL’s engage that entire booty and hamstrings, especially the gluteus medius due to its unilateral stability property. This is a great way to spice up some routine deadlifts.

                    Before & After Working Out

                    Before engaging in any physical activity, consult a doctor if you have not worked out in years. However, if you want to go at it without consulting a doctor, start slow and build your way up. Even though it’s home workout, use dynamic stretching or some light jogging[2] as a warm up before starting the lower body workouts.

                    Finally, at the end of the lower body workout, use static stretching to reduce injuries and to calm down your heart rate gradually.

                    Featured photo credit: Gesina Kunkel via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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