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Top 3 Dropbox Alternatives You Should Try

Top 3 Dropbox Alternatives You Should Try

Nowadays everyone spends a lot of time acquiring data on computer and then try to find number of ways to store it. Finding enough storage space to store a large number of bytes can be challenging though. People invest in hard drives and some others external storage devices such as compact discs or thumb drives. And some delete entire folders of old files so as to make space.

The new trend of cloud storage allows you to save data to an off-site storage system which is maintained by third party. Thus instead of storing data on to your computer’s local storage or hard drive, data is saved to remote database and with an Internet connection you will be able to access data from any location. Thus you don’t need to use the same device to save and retrieve data or carry a physical storage device around. The cloud service also provides file back up so that they are never lost, even if your computer crashes or phone breaks. The number of services available in the market can make it difficult to pick one based on storage, paid plans, operating system, etc., so below are descriptions of some of the most popular:

#1. pCloud

pCloud is a personal cloud space where one can store all folders and files. It offers a user-friendly interface where everything can be located easily and clearly. pCloud servers are based in Switzerland, so is great cloud service for business users concerned about privacy as the NSA cannot go through the data. If you choose the premium option, pCloud also provides you with private encryption which is known by you only. It works for almost all platforms and devices including Linux, Windows, Mac and Android and iOS devices.

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You can install pCloud on computer through pCloud Drive, which creates a secure virtual drive that expands local storage space. All devices are synchronized, so any change you make in pCloud can be seen immediately on your tablet, computer or phone. pCloud offers 20GB of storage space for free which is an excellent alternative for personal users. The files are searchable and can be filtered on the basis of file formats.

There are quick search icons for documents, audio, and images and clicking on them opens the specific files. Any files deleted from pCloud account will be in the Trash folder for a specific number of days, depending on which plan you choose. You can then share your content with multiple users whether they are on pCloud or not by giving them permissions. With the shareable Upload and Download Link features, anyone you choose can upload and download files to and from your pCloud account directly.

By turning on the Automatic Upload feature then any mobile media will be automatically uploaded to your pCloud account. You can instantly synchronize files between multiple devices and your cloud storage platform with one click. It uses TLS/SSL encryption when data is transferred from a device to servers, ensuring that your data stays protected.

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#2. Google Drive

Formerly known as Google Docs, Google Drive lets you store, edit, collaborate and create documents on a cloud-based server. It offers free storage up to 15GB. It requires little setup if one have a Google account. It comprises of Slides (an online version of Microsoft Office’s Powerpoint), Google Docs (a version of Word) and Sheets (a version of Excel). Drive has apps for Android and iOS for managing and viewing files from phone.

While you can access any file from Drive web site, you can also download the Drive desktop app for PC and Mac to manage files on your system. You can even choose to access them when offline so you don’t have to worry about having a constant Internet connection. You can organize all your files in the desktop app, and they will sync with the cloud so you can get to them from anywhere. It also offers large number of extras like third-party apps which can sign documents or send faxes. In addition, Google Drive has the feature of dragging and dropping of files into the Drive website to automatically upload it. You can also preview the attachments from Gmail (Google’s mail service) in Drive, and can save those files in the cloud also.

Google Drive also introduced Google Photos, which is an online photo locker in which you can organize your photos into albums. You can find it in Drive as separate tab. One neat feature of the app is that you are not required to download Google Photos app on your tablet or phone to back up the pictures you take. The Google Drive app will take care of that automatically for you.

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#3. OneDrive

OneDrive was formerly known as SkyDrive. It comes with Microsoft Office’s Online Tools and Outlook email to integrate your apps as well as synchronize your data. OneDrive will synchronize all your files in single folder on a system which gives you access to all your important files from any location on an unlimited number of devices.

OneDrive comes as a free addition to any Microsoft account including MSN, Hotmail, Live, Outlook and Xbox Live. Microsoft gives you 15GB of free storage though it can be increased to 18GB by installing OneDrive on a portable device. It also enables you to automatically upload your camera roll.

If you’ve got the social bug, you can increase your storage to a maximum of 25GB storage by inviting ten friends as you will get 0.5GB for each successful referral. The service has also recently increased the maximum file size from 2GB to 10GB, which means even the largest videos and photos don’t need to be split up into smaller files before uploading them. In a final distinguishing feature, the files stored in OneDrive can be embedded into a web page, making it easy to place tables or images onto a website.

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Either of the above three cloud storage systems can be a great tool for  accessing your business or personal data from wherever you need. Try out any of these services to increase your storage and to back up all of your data!!

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Abhay Jeet Mishra

Writer at Lifehack & Enterested.com

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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