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7 Common Habits You Might Not Know Can Lead To Athlete’s Foot

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7 Common Habits You Might Not Know Can Lead To Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that usually appears as rashes between the toes. Scratching the infected skin and then touching other parts of your body can cause it to spread to the toenails,[1] hands and groin. It can affect anyone at any time, but it’s most commonly seen in athletes.

Medically termed tinea pedis, athlete’s foot isn’t a serious disease, but it’s not easy to cure unless you are consistent with your treatment, and continue to take precautions to prevent it from flaring up again. It is an annoying disease though, and the affected area may be itchy, scaly, dry, or blistered.[2]

Athlete’s foot is a contagious disease, and it can easily be passed from person to person. It is caused by fungus, and these microbes thrive in damp, warm, and dark places. This same fungus causes ringworm and jock itch. The common habits that cause this athlete’s foot are:

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1. Damp Feet

If your feet are not dry and clean, you may easily pick up the infection from a contaminated surface. Thoroughly wash your feet and gently dry them, especially between the toes. You can use talcum powder on your feet to help them stay dry.

2. From your Footwear

Repeatedly using the same shoes without cleaning, or not allowing the sweat and dampness inside to dry thoroughly are other contributors. Open-toed footwear allows the air to keep the feet dry, while closed footwear like sneakers hold the dampness in. Avoid wearing shoes that make your feet hot and damp. Wear roomy shoes made of natural materials like leather. It is advisable to change your shoes every couple of days to allow them to dry out between uses.

3. From your Socks

Sweaty, damp socks hold the moisture in and is one of the worst culprits behind athlete’s foot. Don’t reuse the same socks without washing and drying it well. Wear a fresh pair every day. Cotton socks are a better choice than synthetic ones, as they allow your feet to “breathe.”[3]

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4. Walking Barefoot in Contaminated Areas

Communal showers, locker rooms, and gyms are highly contaminated with disease, causing microbes, and walking barefoot in these areas can easily cause athlete’s foot.

5. Sharing Contaminated Items

As mentioned earlier, athlete’s foot is highly contagious. A person may scratch the affected area and then transfer the microbes to his personal belongings. So if you share a towel, socks, or shoes, you may end up with the same problem. Ensure that your own towels are washed regularly, and don’t share them with anyone in a communal setting, especially locker rooms.

6. A Weakened Immune System

These microbes are present almost everywhere, and if you have a weakened immune system, you will contract the disease much faster if you don’t take adequate precautions to keep your feet clean and dry at all times.[4] It is not advisable to use moisturizers between your toes, as the moisture helps the fungi multiply.

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7. Other Health Conditions

Some health conditions, like diabetes, make a person more prone to contracting these kinds of diseases. So, just same as a person with a weakened immune system, people with such health conditions should also take extra precautions to stay dry.

It is unlikely that athlete’s foot will get better on its own. Treatment is easy enough with pharmacy-bought creams. To speed up the recovery process and prevent athlete’s foot from returning, it’s important to practice good foot hygiene, during treatment and afterwards.

If not resolved, athlete’s foot can become infected with bacteria. Cellulitis[5] is a severe infection that can spread deep into the body, and this can become life threatening. Follow the steps above to heal yourself, and reduce the risk of spreading the infection.

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athletes-foot-infographic

    Infographic Source: defensesoap.com[6]

    Featured photo credit: www.drjefflamour.com via drjefflamour.com

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    Reference

    More by this author

    Anju Mobin

    Anju is a Certified Nutritionist, and a Highly Experienced Health, Fitness and Nutrition Writer.

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    Last Updated on December 2, 2021

    The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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    The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

    Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

    There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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    Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

    Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

    Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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    Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

    1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
    2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
    3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
    4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
    5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

    Now on to the checklist!

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    Here is how your checklist should look

    1. CAMPSITE GEAR

    • Tent, poles, stakes
    • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
    • Extra tarp or canopy
    • Sleeping bag for each camper
    • Sleeping pad for each camper
    • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
    • Pillows
    • Extra blankets
    • Chairs
    • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
    • Lantern
    • Lantern fuel or batteries

    2.  KITCHEN

    • Stove
    • Fuel for stove
    • Matches or lighter
    • Pot
    • French press or portable coffee maker
    • Corkscrew
    • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
    • Food-storage containers
    • Trash bags
    • Cooler
    • Ice
    • Water bottles
    • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
    • Cups, mugs
    • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
    • Cutting board
    • Foil
    • soap
    • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
    • Paper towels
    • Extra bin for washing dishes

    3. CLOTHES

    • Clothes for daytime
    • Sleepwear
    • Swimsuits
    • Rainwear
    • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
    • Extra layers for warmth
    • Gloves
    • Hats

    4. PERSONAL ITEMS

    • Sunscreen
    • Insect repellent
    • First-aid kit
    • Prescription medications
    • Toothbrush, toiletries
    • Soap

    5. OTHER ITEMS

    • Camera
    • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
    • Maps, area information

    This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

    Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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