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4 Ways Your Kids Might Get Around in the Future

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4 Ways Your Kids Might Get Around in the Future

Many adults can remember movies like Back to the Future or Star Trek from when they were kids. They may even look back at these movies with fond memories and note that many of the technologies that seemed so impossible in those movies actually exist today. That sentiment leaves many of today’s youth wondering what their old age will be like. How will kids be getting around in ten, twenty, or thirty years? Here are four ways they just might be getting themselves from point A to point B.

1. Hyperloop

The hyperloop[1] is the brainchild of Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla. The concept is similar to that of a train, except ten times faster. To make the technology work, a hyperloop between two cities must be created. It is essentially a tube that has been vacuum sealed, and people ride in pods from one end of the loop to another. Because it takes place in a vacuum, it is expected to be able to travel at over 700 mph.

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If hyperloops become mainstream, then residents of the future can travel at speeds faster than most planes, and interstate travel can become much simpler. Kids of the future will step into a pod and exit an hour later two states away.

2. Hoverboard

If you have followed hoverboard news at all, then you know there were many issues with the original hoverboards and catching on fire. Fortunately, most of that has been resolved. What is more unfortunate is that what we call hoverboards today actually do no hovering whatsoever.

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Fortunately, there are plenty of companies out there pushing for real hoverboards. And, there is a decent list of real hoverboards,[2] and the various technologies that they are using to fulfill many people’s sci-fi dreams. They range from hoverbikes to hoverboards that resemble skateboards.

3. Smart Car

Many people have heard of Google’s smart cars or Tesla’s nearly-smart cars that are already on the roads. These cars have the ability to drive themselves. Most major players in the auto industry are already hard at work with their own version of a smart car.

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Many of these auto makers expect to have the vehicles road-ready by 2020.[3] This means within three years society can expect smart cars to begin selling to mainstream consumers.

One way smart car technology will change the world is with rentals. Some experts are already envisioning a world where no one owns cars. Imagine just pulling open an app on your phone, saying you need a car, and within ten minutes a completely autonomous smart car has pulled up, and is ready to take you to your destination. When the car needs servicing it will take itself to the auto shop.

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4. Flying Cars

Perhaps even more exciting than smart cars are flying cars. Henry Ford himself actually dreamed of a day when cars could fly and everyone could own their own “personal airplane.” Unfortunately, reality was much more complicated when it came to planes, and nothing ever came of it.

Recently a company called Skycar[4] has been pushing for flying vehicles. The biggest obstacle to overcome has been a necessary ability for vertical takeoff. If a personal flying vehicle had to have a runway to get into the air it would likely never become mainstream. Fortunately, Skycar claims they have resolved this issue and are currently in the prototype stage.

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Whichever technology ends up going mainstream, you can expect that kids of the future will have a much simpler travel experience than those of today. Whether the journey is easier, safer, or faster, it will definitely be an improvement. Some industries will explode with these changes, and others, such as insurance or defensive driving courses may find themselves readjusting or desperately clinging to an old way of life.

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Paisley Hansen

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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