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5 Common Car Insurance Myths Debunked

5 Common Car Insurance Myths Debunked

Auto insurance can be difficult to navigate through, particularly for younger car owners who have little experience navigating its waters. There are a number of common misconceptions about how your car insurance works, ranging from what it covers to how they determine what to charge you for coverage.

A responsible car owner should do their best to familiarize themselves with their insurance policy to understand how it works and what exactly it is they’re paying for. This can help you know your options should you ever get into a car accident without having to worry about learning everything as you use your insurance. Here are five common car insurance myths debunked.

Myth 1: Red cars are more expensive to insure

This persistent myth claims that red cars, being more attractive and thus more prone to theft, are expensive to insure and therefore will garner a higher car insurance payment for you. Up to 53 percent of millennials believe the myth that red cars are more expensive to insure. But of all the factors that go into determining what you will pay for insurance, the color of your car is not one of them.

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Many insurance agencies don’t even ask what color your car is before assigning you a rate. Factors that are taken into account include year, make, model, body type, engine, and age of the car.

Other factors that are more likely to affect your rate than the car color include the age of the driver and the city the car will be used in most often.

Myth 2: Insurance only applies when you are not at fault

Although 44 percent of Americans believe that insurance will not cover you in an at-fault accident, the truth is, insurance companies will help cover repairs, even for accidents you caused.

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Many states require liability coverage, or coverage to pay for repairs and medical costs associated with accidents in which you are at fault, but adding collision coverage and medical payment coverage to your insurance can help you out when you accidentally cause an accident so you aren’t left footing the entire bill alone.

Myth 3: Insurance applies to regular repairs

One thing your insurance will not cover are repairs for wear-and-tear and normal breakdown that happens from the depreciation of your car. You are responsible for maintaining your car, which means learning how to monitor it yourself or developing a relationship with a mechanic you can trust and taking your car in for regular check-ups.

In addition, reporting too many car problems to your insurance company in an attempt to get them to cover it will likely backfire. In fact, repeatedly telling them your car is giving you trouble will only make them want to raise your insurance premiums.

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Myth 4: Insurance will pay post-accident values

When your car is completely totaled after an accident, your insurance will look at a number of factors to determine your car’s actual car value in order to decide how much to provide as payout. However, one thing they will not do is attempt to calculate the ACV of your car post-accident.

After a wreck where your car is totaled and you need an auto accident lawyer, the post-accident value is almost certainly going to be near zero. Your insurance company cannot use this value and will calculate pre-accident values instead. However, don’t be surprised when that number is lower than the Kelly Blue Book claimed value of the car, as insurance companies do look for legal ways to minimize payout.

Myth 5: Auto insurance protects things inside your car

If you have comprehensive insurance, you may have some form of theft coverage. However, this coverage is for the vehicle itself, not the goods inside of the vehicle, which means anything expensive or of value that’s taken from your car is up to you to replace, not your insurance company. A break-in is similarly covered only to the extent that you can replace a broken window or handle, but what is taken in the break-in must be replaced on your dime.

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Of course, some forms of homeowner’s or renter’s insurance provide coverage for things inside your car, so you may want to look into the details of either of those policies if you have them because car insurance alone will not protect you from someone breaking into your car and taking your valuables.

Your car insurance is a valuable tool for peace of mind when you’re on the road, but it’s important that you make sure to know what exactly you’re paying for and what kind of coverage you have. It’s also important to consider what lacking coverage in certain areas can mean, and why you don’t necessarily want the simplest, cheapest plan available.

Featured photo credit: Saundra Castaneda via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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