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Still Believe Long Workout Is Good For Your Heart? You Should Exercise In This Way Instead!

Still Believe Long Workout Is Good For Your Heart? You Should Exercise In This Way Instead!

If you’re anything like me, you love starting your day with a great workout. However, many people believe that they should work out once a day (for about an hour or so). I’ve got some shocking information for you and it will change the way you workout for life!

Slow and steady does not win the race

You read that right, folks. Working out for an hour or so going from machine to machine is only going to wear your body down. Dr. Joel Seeman (an exercise psychologist) has research to back this up!

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“Excessively long workouts create a lot of fatigue that will deteriorate your movement patterns, and your technique is going to break down. That’s not only going to have a negative impact on that workout itself, but the poor technique you engrained in that workout will trickle into the next workout,” he says.

This is an incredible finding, and I want to take amount to stop and reflect on it so it really sinks in. Long, slow workouts just wear you down without actually helping you. If this is the case, what can we do to make sure this doesn’t happen?

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Try Interval Training

Interval training means alternating workouts through short bursts of high-intensity exercise, rather than pushing yourself over time. “High-intensity basically means exercising at a higher intensity or velocity than you could otherwise sustain for 5 to 10 minutes before becoming exhausted,” says Dr. Howard Knuttgen at Harvard-affiliated Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

Howard found that interval training was actually better for your heart and cardiovascular health. Exercising in intervals trains your heart to recover faster because it starts to expect another intense push. When you train without a break, you don’t give your heart or your body the time it needs to recover.

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You generally want to do about 150 minutes of high-intensity training per week, simplifying to 30 minutes per day. This training can range anywhere from a fast-paced walk each morning to selecting “interval” on a workout machine in the gym. It’s so simple to do, and it will ensure that your body is getting the right amount of exercise (and relaxation) it needs.

The Final Verdict

Interval training is great for those who have busy schedules and can’t afford to work out for long periods of time. You can break up your 60-minute workout throughout the day while doing 30 minutes of walking in the morning and 30 minutes of strength training at night. You don’t have to do interval training every day, but it’s recommended that you do it four times a week to see results.

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Personally, I love to do four short 15-minute workouts every day. Usually, that consists of a few quick walks (I don’t jog or run because it hurts my knees), some ab workouts (i.e. leg lifts, planks, crunches, and bicycles), and some strength training (i.e. pushups, pull-ups, and dips, bench press, curls, and tricep curls).

A Word of Warning

As great as interval training is, you should exercise caution when first starting out. For an otherwise healthy person, interval training should be fine as long as you start slow. However, if you have heart disease or high blood pressure, talk to your doctor before starting interval training, or any new exercise program for that matter — especially if you’re not very active.

Are you going to change up your workout routine now that you know about interval training? I know I sure have, and I can never look at working out the same way again! Thanks for reading, and don’t forget to share so we can spread the word and help people everywhere.

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Bill Widmer

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Last Updated on February 18, 2019

8 Best Cardio Workouts for Efficient Weight Loss

8 Best Cardio Workouts for Efficient Weight Loss

When people think of cardio, usually a boring treadmill, elliptical machine, or other mundane activity comes to mind. But that doesn’t have to be the case.

When you’re short on time or easily distracted, there are a variety of fat-burning cardio alternatives that will increase your body’s metabolism, boost weight loss, and keep you interested.

Here’s a list of different types of cardio workouts:

  • Steady State (Burns less fat, but isn’t as demanding on the body)
  • Interval Training (Burns more fat)
  • HIIT
  • Spinning
  • Stairs
  • Weight Training (Supersets) short rest periods
  • Weight Training (Compound Sets) short rest periods
  • Machine Circuit Training

And I’m going to talk about each of them in detail:

1. Steady State

Steady state cardio involves working at a low to moderate intensity — around 60 to 70 percent of your maximum heart rate, for a sustained period of time. This type of cardio doesn’t burn a huge number of calories, but it does burn a high percentage of fat tissue for fuel, and it isn’t too draining.

An example of steady state cardio would be a long outdoor walk at a moderate pace. Interval training, on the other hand, is much more intense.

2. Interval Training

Similar to HIIT but with exercises that are slightly longer in duration, interval training alternates levels of intensity. For example, if you enjoy running, you would run or sprint for 30 seconds, then bring down your heart rate and walk for two minutes.

Pick two intensities per interval, usually one at 85 percent of your maximum heart rate and the other at 60 percent, and alternate between them. I find that 85% for 30 seconds and 60% for one minute, not only burns more calories but increases my energy level as well.

Another example would be jumping rope. Jump rope for two minutes, rest for one minute. Begin again, this time jumping rope for one minute and resting for one minute. On the third and final round, jump rope for 30 seconds and resting for 30 seconds. Repeat five sets of this routine.

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3. HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training)

Have a busy schedule? Fifteen minutes a few times a week is all you need. HIIT is an extremely popular workout because it can be done quickly, burn calories in a short amount of time, and can even be done in your home or during a lunch break at work. And the best part – You don’t need any equipment.

With the use of your body weight, HIIT is typically 20 seconds of high intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of active rest which means your heart rate remains elevated for the entire 15-minute workout.

Check out this HIIT routine by Fitness Blender: 15 Minute HIIT Workout

4. Spinning

Spinning is a great way to get your heart up and keep it up in a 45-minute spin class. Our thighs and back are our largest muscles so they work the hardest.

To get the most out of spinning, try to stay out of the saddle throughout an entire spin class. That way, you are forced to hold up your body weight which burns more calories and increases intensity.

It’s also great for stabilizing and building strong core muscles, versus cycling outdoors, where most of the time you are sitting in the saddle and going for distance (steady-state cardio).

5. Stairs

One of my favorite places to get out of the gym for cardio and trim fat from my thighs and butt is the Santa Monica Stairs, near California’s most popular beach. Climbing 170 steps a few times builds the glutes, leans the thighs, strengthens the calves, and builds endurance.

So, if the gym is not your scene and you love the outdoors, climbing stairs is a great alternative. Find a place with multiple steps, do six or seven rounds, and you’ve easily burned around 600 calories.

6. Supersets

A superset is two exercises that work opposing muscle groups, such as biceps and triceps, quadriceps and hamstrings, or different body parts such as the lower and upper body with little to no recovery between sets.

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The superset may include two to five sets of 8 to 15 repetitions of each exercise or more.[1]

So, if you love to workout with weight-training but aren’t really feeling cardio, supersets with no more than 30-second rest periods between exercises will keep your heart rate up. Not only will you build muscle, you will burn fat!

For example, say you are doing a leg workout, five sets of exercises with high reps and low weight is all it takes to turn your weight-training into a cardio workout.

Here’s one of my leg training workouts:

i. Dumbbell Step-Ups on a secure bench or box (4×15, each leg)

ii. Front Squat (4×15)

iii. Wide Stance Dumbbell Goblet (4×15)

iv. Leg Extension (4×15)

v. Leg Curl (4×15)

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    Photo Credit: Shape Magazine

    vi. Front Squat


      Photo Credit: Stack

      vii. Wide Stance Dumbbell Goblet Squat

      viii. Leg Extension

      ix. Leg Curl

        Photo Credit: T Nation

        7. Compound Sets

        Compound exercises are exercises that recruit muscles in the entire body, such as pull-ups, squats, bench press, etc. However, a compound set simply means to “compound” the number of different exercises into a series of sets with little or no recovery between, similar to supersets.

          This may be accomplished by performing four to five exercises for the same muscle group, opposing muscle groups or total body exercises performed in succession such as full body extensions, followed by squat/cleans and complete the compound set of compound exercises with lunges with biceps curls.

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          Compound sets put stress on the body and are great for expending additional calories while strength-training.

          8. Machine Weight Training Circuit

          Like compound exercises, a machine circuit workout targets the entire body, upper body, lower body, or core. The difference is, with the use of machines instead of free weights, muscle strength is increased by by making your muscles work against weight.[2] By limiting rest periods between exercises to 30 seconds, your metabolism will go into over-drive!

          Machines also give you better control over the exercises, which decreases risk of injury.

          Here’s a machine circuit training example: Muscle and Strength Machine Workout

          The Bottom Line

          The above-mentioned workouts should be completed within 30 minutes, unless you’re taking a class which is typically 45 to 60 minutes, giving you time to get on with the rest of your day.

          By keeping your rest periods to a minimum between exercises, your heart rate will stay elevated and you will burn more calories, get lean, and have more energy.

          Don’t be a gym rat, spending unnecessary time doing lengthy workouts that give you minimum results. For efficient weight loss, perform these workouts three times a week and watch the fat melt away while achieving your fitness goals.

          More Resources About Weight Loss

          Featured photo credit: Spencer Dahl via unsplash.com

          Reference

          [1] Mountain Life Fitness: Super sets, compound sets and giant sets
          [2] Better Health Channel: Resistance training – health benefits

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