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5 Things You Should Consider Before Buying Your Field Hockey Equipment

5 Things You Should Consider Before Buying Your Field Hockey Equipment

The origins of field hockey go back thousands of years, though the modern version was developed during the 18th century. If you have a little one who wants to be a field hockey athlete or aspire to be one yourself, there are quite a few items to help you be the best hockey player out there. This includes, but is not limited to, sticks, goggles, gloves, shin guards, etc. With that much time being associated with the sport, the amount of modern equipment that is now available can seem overwhelming.

To help you decide which equipment is right for you, here are five things to consider before making any purchases.

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Rules and Requirements

If you or your child are playing in a league, the first source of guidance for all of your equipment decisions should be the rules and regulations in place. Certain points, like mandatory safety equipment and approved stick weights, might be controlled by the league in which you intend to play. Regardless of personal preferences, you have to make sure your choices are within the scope of the rules. Otherwise, you won’t be allowed to play with the equipment you have. That means you will be stuck buying more just to play with the field hockey group you already joined.

Player Position

While most participants in the sport of field hockey use the same equipment, that isn’t always the case. If you or your child plan to play goalie, then you will need to purchase different kinds of equipment in comparison to other players.

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For example, goalies need a helmet with proper face protection. Additionally, you will need to invest in additional padding, including arm and hand protection. The size of the pads may be dictated by the league, so make sure to refer to any associated rules and regulations before purchasing goalie equipment as well.

Local Weather

Traditionally, field hockey is an outdoor sport. That means your local weather may impact some of your purchasing decisions. For example, certain field hockey shoes may perform better on wet or muddy fields than others. If you live in an area with a lot of rain, choosing the right shoes can help prevent slips and falls.

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Another weather consideration is the average temperature. Certain materials breathe better than others, making them better choices in warm or hot climates. Others are more insulating, which may be appropriate for cooler locations.

Potential Growth

A point some parents fail to consider when purchasing equipment for their child is the likelihood that they will grow out of the equipment. While it is always critical to make sure that the equipment is accurate by basing your purchases on the player’s current size, you might not want to invest in more expensive options if you expect your child to have a growth spurt in the near future. In contrast, you might feel more comfortable investing in more expensive options if you don’t expect a dramatic change in size.

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Even if you think you or your child might outgrow the equipment rather quickly, that doesn’t mean you should ignore quality entirely. However, you might want to consider when a replacement may be necessary in order to help determine a comfortable price point, that way you don’t over invest in an item that will no longer be usable after a single season.

Comfort

No matter how fancy or expensive a piece of equipment may be, you don’t want to choose something that is uncomfortable to use. For example, field hockey sticks come in a number of lengths and weights. Sticks that are too short or too long will feel awkward to use. Similarly, a stick that is too heavy or light may not provide the power or control for which you are looking.

Goggles, gloves, shoes, shin guards, and mouth pieces all need to be the right size. Not only will this make you more comfortable, but it also ensures that everything is performing their function in the best way possible.

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Shelly Green

Entrepreneur writer and a blogger

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Last Updated on September 15, 2020

4 Ways to Deal With Big Life Changes in a Positive Way

4 Ways to Deal With Big Life Changes in a Positive Way

Life changes are constant. Whether it’s in the workplace or our relationships, nothing in life ever remains the same for long.

Regardless of the gravity of change, it can always be a little scary. So scary, in fact, that some people are downright crippled by the idea of it, causing them to remain stagnant through anxiety.

Have you ever noticed how much of life’s transitional periods are riddled with anxious vibes? The quarter life crisis, the mid-life crisis, cold feet before getting married, retirement anxiety, and teenage angst are just a few examples of transitional periods when people tend to panic.

We can’t control every aspect of our lives, and we can’t stop change from happening. However, how we respond to change will greatly affect our overall life experience.

Here are 4 ways you can approach life changes in a positive way.

1. Don’t Fight It

I once heard one of my favorite yoga instructors say “Suffering is what occurs when we resist what is already happening.” The lesson has stuck with me ever since.

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Life changes are usually out of our control. Rather than trying to manipulate the situation and wishing things were different, try flowing with it instead.

Of course, some initial resistance is natural if we’re going into survival mode. Just make sure you are conscious of when this resistance is no longer serving you.

If you’re feeling anxious about impending life changes, it’s time to practice some techniques to address the anxiety directly. These can include meditation, exercise, talking with friends about how you’re feeling, or journaling.

If you’re worried about a big life change, such as starting a new job[1] or moving in with your partner, do your best to control your expectations. It may help you to talk with people you know about their experiences going through similar changes. This will help you form a realistic picture in your mind of what things will look like post-change.

2. Find Healthy Ways to Deal With Feelings

Whenever we’re in transitional periods, it can be easy to lose track of ourselves. Sometimes we feel like we’re being tossed about by life and like we’ve lost our footing, causing some very uncomfortable feelings to arise.

One way we can channel these feelings is by finding healthy ways to release them. For instance, whenever I find myself in a difficult transitional phase, I end up in a mixed martial arts studio.

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The physical activity helps me channel my emotions and release endorphins. It also helps me get in shape, which generally increases my mood and energy levels.

Exercise is important in cultivating positive emotions, but if you’re struggling with anxiety in particular, it’s important to cultivate a regular exercise routine as opposed to a one-off workout. One study found that “Aerobic exercise can promote increase in anxiety acutely and regular aerobic exercise promotes reduction in anxiety levels”[2].

If exercise isn’t your thing, there are other, less intense ways of cultivating positive emotions and reducing anxiety around life changes. You can try stretching, meditating, reading in nature, spending time with family and friends, or cooking a healthy meal.

Find what makes you feel good and helps you ground yourself in the present moment.

3. Reframe Your Perspective

Reframing perspectives is a very powerful tool used in life coaching. It helps clients take a situation they are struggling with, such as a major life change, and find some sort of empowerment in it.

Some examples of disempowered thinking during life changes include casting blame, focusing on negative details, or victimizing[3]. These perspectives can make awkward transitional phases much worse than they have to be.

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Meanwhile, if we utilize a more positive perspective, such as finding a lesson in the situation, realizing that there may be an opportunity for something, or that everything passes, we can come from a greater place of ease.

4. Find Time for Self-Reflection

Having time to reflect is important at any stage in your life, but it’s especially important during transitional periods. It’s quite simple really: we need our time to step back and get centered when things get a little crazy.

As a result, big life changes are perfect for doing some self-reflection. They are opportunities to check in with ourselves and practice getting grounded for a few minutes.

Take a look at this reflective cycle adapted from Glibb’s Self-reflection guide (1988):[4]

Use self-reflection when facing life changes.

    Self-reflective exercises include meditating, yoga or journaling,[5] all of which require some quiet time to get yourself together.

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    One study found that journal improves “self-efficacy, locus of control, and learning”[6]. A healthy sense of self-control can make the process of change easier to bear, so that in itself is a great reason to try self-reflection through journaling.

    To learn how to start journaling, you can check out this article.

    Final Thoughts

    Big life changes may rock us for a little while, but they don’t have to be as bad as we initially perceive them. If handled in a positive manner, transitional periods can pave the way for some serious self-growth, reflection, and awareness.

    Cultivate a sense of positivity and find ways to diminish the anxiety around life changes. Once you make it to the other side, you’ll be grateful that you made it through in the best way possible.

    More Tips on Facing Life Changes

    Featured photo credit: Alora Griffiths via unsplash.com

    Reference

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