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Canada and its typical Christmas traditions .

Canada and its typical Christmas traditions .

It’s the time of the year we all have been waiting for, it’s time for Christmas. A time of the year where the winter snow adorns the street and the ugly sweaters comes out of the closet. It’s a time to bond and indulge in family traditions. Enjoy the comfort of family and friends while sipping on warm wine and eggnogs.

However, does tradition vary based on countries or is Santa a common belief all around the world? For example in Austria instead of Santa people believe in “Krisken” and instead of Santa’s loyal elves, they believe in “Krampus” to ward off evil. So how is it going to be like in other countries where Christmas is the main celebration?

Today, we decided to put together the highlights of Christmas in Canada. Are they similar to their border brother America or do they practice a completely different Christmas?

1. Santa Is The Same Everywhere

Santa: it’s a child’s wish to watch his thick belly slide down with ease bellow their chimneys and leave presents. That Santa is Ho Ho Ho-ing with his reindeer and leaving trails of cookie crumbs behind has been the belief of people all around the world. It’s not much different in Canada either. Canadians pride upon telling their children that Canada is the home of Santa, although the Finnish may disagree but Canadians celebrate Santa with a more personal relationship.

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Have you heard of the Santa Parade?

If you haven’t, then you’ll be excited to know Toronto has been the oldest organizer of the Santa parade. Happening in the week of Christmas, the streets of Toronto are filled with Santas and their fans. It started in the midst of 1913 where a huge Santa was paraded around the streets and children followed his trail. Now it’s an international event, with live broadcasts all around the world where 25 floats and more than 2000 people can be seen participating.

However, in the South Shore of Nova Scotia, Santa brings a laugh among the people. In a celebration called Belsnickeling, people take pride in dressing up in funny Santa costumes and creating a trail of laughter.

Pleasantly, we are not surprised that Canada has managed to embrace diversity even with Santa.

2. ‘Réveillon’, A French History

We are all aware of the two main influences in Canada. The English and the French. The French cities of Canada such as Quebec are some of the prettiest cities of this century. With it being part of the UNESCO Culture Heritage program, Quebec is deemed a prestigious and unique city.

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However, that isn’t the only point that stands out with the French community in Canada. ‘Réveillon’ is an event celebrated by the French community on the eve of Christmas. This celebration starts with the Midnight Mass and ends in the early hours of Christmas morning. A beautiful tradition where they pray to ‘Père Noel’ (A Version of Santa) to pay a visit and leave gifts for the children.

A traditional meal for Christmas in the cultural Quebec is ‘ragoût aux pattes de cochons’ which is made from pigs feet however over the years many have opted for an easier alternative which is called ‘Tortière’, a form of meat pie which is usually made out of venison however sometimes using pig or beef meat .

Are you excited to be part of the ‘Réveillon’?

3. The Old Skool Goodies Of Canadian Christmas Treats

The best part about Christmas is the fact that we can enjoy the beautiful delicacies that are blessed onto us once every year. The tiny gingerbread, the chocolate shaped Santa and the cinnamon cookies are a tradition. The rock hard fruit cake and the delicious hot chocolate to go with it is a tradition in all Christmas countries.

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However, Canadians await their own unique candy, homemade in their motherland . At first, the names may throw you off, however, we have all learned not to judge a book by its cover. Barley Candy, similar to our chocolate Santa’s these are formed in various shapes that represent Christmas. If you’ve enjoyed gummy bears than their appearance might not be that drastic however it definitely is sweet.

“Chicken Bones” is another of Canada’s wonderful candies. It’s not made out of chicken bones or shaped like one, however, it has a soft and fluffy exterior with a milk chocolate filling. Once the exterior melts in your mouth, you’ll then be able to enjoy the juicy and soft center.

For Canadians, these candies are definitely a treat.

4. All Kinds Of Meat

Meat mania is a common thing in every household during Christmas, for vegetarians, it becomes a challenge to adapt and enjoy meat. In Canada however, the multiculturalism has created a diverse array of food, where not only meat is the main delicacy but several other food groups as well.

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For example, Canada’s Ukrainian community which is the largest Ukranian community in the world after in Ukraine and in Russia, enjoy themselves with a platter of 12 different kinds of meat while the community in Nova Scotia starts Christmas with an array of seafood. Usually for the main course lobster is the popular dish, since Nova Scotia is located near the shore, their produce’s come directly from the sea.

Through the food, you can identify the cultural background and the type of natural produce that’s located in that region. Bring them all together then you’ve got Canada.

In Conclusion

If you’re planning on staying in Canada this Christmas then you should definitely check these things out. It will be an amazing experience for you .

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

“Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

Are we speaking the same language?

My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

Am I being lazy?

When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

Early in the relationship:

“Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

When the relationship is established:

“Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

Have I actually got anything to say?

When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

Am I painting an accurate picture?

One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

What words am I using?

It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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Is the map really the territory?

Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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