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If You’ve Been Diagnosed With Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Try These Dietary Changes

If You’ve Been Diagnosed With Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Try These Dietary Changes

Following a PCOS diet won’t only help to alleviate symptoms and potentially cure the syndrome, it may also improve your overall health as you’re strongly encouraged to follow a diet rich in natural ingredients!

How is PCOS affecting your body?

It means your body is not using insulin properly. Insulin is a vital tool in our bodies’ digestive process as it promotes the absorption of glucose. If a person is insulin-resistant, their blood sugar levels rise. This, in turn, causes the pancreas to pump out high levels of insulin to compensate.

In a woman, this can lead the ovaries to produce more androgens, such as testosterone, which can manifest itself in several ways, including sudden increased hairiness and other unpleasant side effects, like acne, irregular menstrual cycles, male pattern baldness, and difficulty losing weight.

It has also been linked to more serious problems, including infertility and heart disease.

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    Medical research, however, has shown that a healthy diet can play a very important role in combating hormonal conditions, such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    It’s important to keep away from processed foods and unhealthy fats, as well as refined carbohydrates, as these all cause inflammation and exacerbate insulin-resistance. Due to this factor, sources of lean protein, such as chicken, turkey, and fish are a great way to go on a PCOS diet. A high-fiber diet can also be very beneficial to women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, as it slows down digestion and reduces the impact of sugar on the blood. Foods with anti-inflammatory properties are recommended because PCOS is linked to inflammatory problems caused by the immune system’s reaction to the syndrome.

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    Below are two examples of recipes that can be chopped and changed, always in a healthy manner of course (think more veg and no processed or refined foods).

    Chicken Stir-Fry

    2 Skinless chicken breasts

    2 Diced onions

    2 Garlic cloves

    Chopped tomatoes

    1 Teaspoon of curry powder

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    1 Teaspoon of turmeric

    1 Teaspoon of chili powder

    Olive oil

    2 Cups brown rice

    This is a bit of a toss-up between a chicken curry and a stir fry because we want to avoid dairy products usually associated with curry sauces, while taking advantage of turmeric, which has very useful anti-inflammatory properties – as do the tomatoes. It’s also best to keep away from seed oils such as vegetable, grapeseed, and canola oil.

    Instructions:

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    1. Allow the rice to cook while browning onions and garlic in a large frying pan.
    2. Cut chicken into pieces and add it into frying pan. Heat until cooked through.
    3. Add tomatoes and spices. Simmer the mixture for about 30 minutes.
    4. Serve over a bowl of brown rice.

    Grilled Salmon and Basil with Steamed Broccoli

    2 Salmon steaks

    2 Tablespoons of olive oil

    2 Tablespoons of lemon juice

    1 Tablespoon fresh basil

    2 Lemon wedges

    1 Cup broccoli florets

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    Salmon is a great source of lean protein, as well as the essential omega-3 fatty acids. It is also considered a fantastic option for PCOS diets because it’s high in Vitamin D. Low levels of vitamin D have been found to correlate with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and are linked to insulin-resistance and acne problems.

    Broccoli also has a very low glycemic index and is a fantastic source of calcium and is very low in calories. Steam if possible to retain as many nutrients as possible in the cooking process.

    Instructions:

    1. Mix lemon juice and basil in a small bowl before brushing the mixture on both sides of the salmon.
    2. Grill at medium temperature until salmon reaches an internal temperature of 145ºF.
    3. Steam broccoli separately.
    4. Serve with lemon wedges.

    It’s important to note that any suggestions are guidelines, and that people with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome have had varying success with different diet plans. As always, it’s important to experiment and see how your body reacts to the changes. Dairy, for example, is known to worsen symptoms in some women, while others haven’t found it necessary to fully remove it from their diet.

    Rely on trial and error to see which foods work best for you and your health.

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    Christopher Young

    Freelance Blogger, Writer and Journalist

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    Last Updated on December 2, 2018

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

    The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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    The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

    Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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    Review Your Past Flow

    Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

    Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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    Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

    Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

    Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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    Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

    Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

    We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

    Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

      Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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