Advertising
Advertising

5 Baby Shower Ideas For First Time Mothers

5 Baby Shower Ideas For First Time Mothers

Baby showers are a fun time for celebrating the new life joining your family. New mothers have a lot to look forward to the first time they get to experience a shower thrown in their honor. Baby showers today frequently include a decoration theme, creative baby-related games, mom-friendly foods and of course showering the mother with gifts.

Whether you’re throwing yourself a baby shower or your friends, family or co-workers are throwing one for you, this day is going to be about you, which means you should enjoy it to the fullest. Here are five ideas for fun ways to spice up your baby shower.

1. Gender reveal event

Although some mothers prefer to know their baby’s gender ahead of their baby shower and receive gifts based on that knowledge, others may prefer to keep the surprise until the baby shower and keep guests guessing.

Advertising

A fun way to celebrate your new child and reveal the gender at your baby shower can be in the form of a gender revealing event. Someone, ideally other than the parents, learns the gender of the baby and prepares some sort of decoration to open. Popular forms include a cake with pink or blue coloring that is revealed when cut into, or a box filled with color-coded balloons that fly out when you open it.

2. Diaper raffle

No matter what gender your baby is, you will go through a mountain of diapers. One excellent tip to stock up is to set up a diaper raffle as part of the baby shower.

Guests are promised one spectacular prize—see if someone is willing to donate the cost of an iPod, a 3DS, a Polaroid camera or another fun electronic—as a raffle prize, and every bag of diapers earns each guest a raffle ticket. Friends and family will be eager to help you prepare for the baby and potentially earn a fun new gadget at the same time.

Advertising

This game works best if you let guests know ahead of time, such as on the invitation, about the raffle and the prize.

3. Baby Bingo

Another fun game that can motivate your guests to bring you helpful gifts and have a good time is Baby Bingo. This game involves drafting up suggestions for gift ideas based on future baby needs. Good ideas to include on the card are baby bottles, diapers, formula, a baby towel, a rattle, washcloths, or baby clothes.

Give each guest a unique bingo card and 10 to 15 Hershey’s Kisses before gift opening time. As the mom opens gifts, each guest can put a Kiss on the appropriate tile, and the winner can get a fun prize or gift card.

Advertising

4. Baby food game

Another fun game for the baby shower involves tasting various baby foods and acquainting yourself with what your future child will be eating. The baby food game is a taste-testing challenge

To play this game, you should set up a variety of flavored baby foods without the labels visible (cover them with tape, peel them off or draw over them, but make sure to remember which is which). Line the bottles up on a table and give each guest one Popsicle stick per flavor.

Let them taste each bottle and write down what they think the flavor is. At the end of the game, reveal one by one the real flavors of your baby foods; whoever guesses the most correctly wins a prize. This game is more challenging than it appears, as baby food flavors come in inventive and varied flavors nowadays. Get creative with your options.

Advertising

5. Onesie decoration station

This baby shower idea gives new moms a chance to let loved ones create something personal for the newest member of the family.

Purchase plain white onesies in varying sizes; many online places allow you to order in bulk to save on cost. At the shower, set up non-toxic fabric markers and paints for guests to use, and give everyone a onesie of their own to decorate. Your guests will love the chance to personalize something your child will wear, and you’ll have something to keep as a reminder while your baby grows.

Baby showers are an excellent time for friends and family to help a new mom get all the things needed to prepare for a newborn and celebrate a new life. Make the most of yours with these fun ideas to personalize and celebrate your event.

Featured photo credit: Family O’Abe via flic.kr

More by this author

5 Focus Hacks To Meet Your Goals 5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With 8 Signs You Have A Strong Personality That Might Scare Some People How to Achieve Quick Success at Work Even If You’re Lacking in Clear Direction You’ll No Longer Be Fooled by Skillful Liars If You Know This Concept

Trending in Motherhood

1 5 Ways to Ease Back to Work Without Nanny Anxiety 2 5 Survival Tips Parents Can Use to Successfully Navigate Through The “Terrible Twos” 3 9 Unforgettable Things My Mother Taught Me 4 10 Prom Tips from One Mom to Another 5 When Should Your Teenager Start Dating?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on February 11, 2021

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

I’m old enough to remember how the cane at school was used for punishment. My dad is old enough to think that banning corporal punishment in schools resulted in today’s poorly disciplined youth. With all of this as my early experiences, there was a time when I would have been better assigned to write about how to negatively discipline your child.

What changed? Thankfully, my wife showed me different approaches for discipline that were very positive. Plus, I was open to learning.

What has not changed is that kids are full of problems with impulses and emotions that flip from sad to happy, then angry in a moment. Though we’re not that different as adults with stress, anxiety, lack of sleep, and stimulants such as sugar and caffeine in our diets.

Punishment as Discipline?

What this means is that we usually take the easy path when a child misbehaves and punish them. Punishment may solve an isolated problem, but it’s not really teaching the kids anything useful in the long term.

Probably it’s time for me to be clear about what I mean by punishment and discipline as these terms are often used interchangeably, but they are quite different.

Discipline VS. Punishment

Punishment is where we inflict pain or suffering on our child as a penalty. Discipline means to teach. They’re quite the opposite, but you’ll notice that teachers, parents, and coaches often confuse the two words.

So, as parents, we have to have clear goals to teach our kids. It’s a long-term plan—using strategies that will have the longest-lasting impact on our kids are the best use of our time and energy.

If you’re clear about what you want to achieve, then it becomes easier to find the best strategy. The better we are at responding when our kids misbehave or do not follow our guidance, the better the results are going to be.

Advertising

3 Positive Discipline Strategies for Your Child

Stay with me as I appreciate that a lot of people who read these blogs do not always have children with impulse control. We’ve had a lot of kids in our martial arts classes that were the complete opposite. They had concentration issues, hyperactive, and disruptive to the other children.

The easy solution is to punish their parents by removing the kids from the class or punish the child with penalties such as time outs and burpees. Yes, it was tempting to do all of this, but one of our club values is that we pull you up rather than push you down.

This means it’s a long-term gain to build trust and confidence, which is destroyed by constant punishments.

Here are the discipline strategies we used to build trust and confidence with these hyperactive kids.

1. Patience

The first positive discipline strategy is to simply be patient. The more patient you are, the more likely you are to get results. Remember I said that we need to build trust and connection. You’ll get further with this goal using patience.

As a coach, sometimes I was not the best person for this role, but we had other coaches in the club that could step in here. As a parent, you may not have this luxury, so it’s really important to recognize any improvements that you see and celebrate them.

2. Redirection

The second strategy we use is redirection. It’s important with a redirection to take “no” out of the equation. Choices are a great alternative.

Imagine a scenario where you’re in a restaurant and your kid is wailing. The hard part here is getting your child to stop screaming long enough for you to build a connection. Most parents have calming strategies and if you practice them with your child, they are more likely to be effective.

Advertising

In the first moment of calm, you can say “Your choice to scream and cry in public is not a good one. It would be best to say, Dad. What can I do to get ice-cream?” You can replace this with an appropriate option.

The challenge with being calm and redirecting is that we need to be clear-minded, focused, and really engaged at the moment. If you’re on your phone, talking with friends or family, thinking about work or the bills, you’ll miss this opportunity to discipline in a way that has long-term benefits.

3. Repair and Ground Rules

The third positive discipline strategy is to repair and use ground rules. Once you’ve given the better option and it has been taken, you have a chance to repair this behavior to lessen its occurrence to better yet, prevent it from happening again. And by setting appropriate ground rules, you can make this a long-term win by helping your child improve their behavior.

It’s these ground rules that help you correct the poor choices of your child and direct the behavior that you want to see.

Consequences Versus Ultimatums

When I was a child and being punished. My parents worked in a busy business for long hours, so their default was to go to ultimatums. “Do that again and you’re grounded for a week,” or “If I catch you doing X, you’ll go to bed without dinner”.

Looking back, this worked to a point. But the flip side is that I remembered more of the ultimatums than the happier times. I’ve learned through trial and error with my own kids that consequences are more effective while not breaking down trust.

What to Do When Ground Rules Get Broken?

It’s on the consequences that you use when the ground rules are broken.

In the martial arts class, when the hyperactive student breaks the ground rules. They would miss a turn in a game or go to the back of the line in a queue. We do not want to shame the child by isolating them. But on the flip side, there should be clear ground rules and proportionate consequences.

Advertising

Yes, there are times when we would like to exclude the student from the class, the club, and even the universe. Again, it’s here that patience is so important and probably impulse control too. With an attainable consequence, you can maintain trust and you’re more likely to get the long-term behavior that you’re looking to achieve.

Interestingly, we would occasionally hear a strategy from parents that little Kevin has been misbehaving at home with his sister or something similar. He likes martial arts training, so the parent would react by removing Kevin from the martial arts class as a punishment.

We would suggest that this would remove Kevin from an environment where he is behaving positively. Removing him from this is likely to be detrimental to the change you would like to see. He may even feel shame when he returns to the class and loses all the progress he’s made.

Alternatives to Punishment

Another option is to tell Kevin to write a letter to his sister, apologizing for his behavior, and explaining how he is going to behave in the future.

If your child is too young to write, give the apology face to face. For the apology to feel sincere, there is some value to pre-framing or practicing this between yourself and your child before they give it to the intended person.

Don’t expect them to know the ground rules or what you’re thinking! It will be clearer to your child and better received with some practice. You can practice along the lines of: “X is the behavior I did, Y is what I should have done, and Z is my promise to you for how I’m going to act in the future.” You can replace XYZ with the appropriate actions.

It does not need to be a letter or in person, it can even be a video. But there has to be an intention to repair the broken ground rule. If you try these strategies, that is become fully engaged with them and you’re still getting nowhere.

But what to do if these strategies do not work? Then there is plenty to gain by seeking the help of an expert. Chances are that something is interfering or limiting their development.

Advertising

This does not mean that your child has a neurological deficiency, although this may be the root cause. But it means that you can get an objective view and help on how to create the changes that you would like to see. Remember that using positive discipline strategies is better than mere punishment.

There are groups that you can chat with for help. Family Lives UK has the aim of ensuring that all parents have somewhere to turn before they reached a crisis point. The NSPCC also provides a useful guide to positive parenting that you can download.[1]

Bottom Line

So, there your go, the three takeaways on strategies you can use for positively disciplining your child. The first one is about you! Be patient, be present, and think about what is best for the long term. AKA, avoid ultimatums and punishment. The second is to use a redirect, then repair and repeat (ground rules) as your 3-step method of discipline.

Using these positive discipline strategies require you to be fully engaged with your child. Again, being impulsive breaks trust and you lose some of the gains you’ve both worked hard to achieve.

Lastly, consequences are better than punishment. Plus, avoid shaming, especially in public at all costs.

I hope this blog has been useful, and remember that you should be more focused on repairing bad behavior because being proactive and encouraging good behavior with rewards, fun, and positive emotions takes less effort than repairing the bad.

More Tips on How To Discipline Your Child

Featured photo credit: Leo Rivas via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] NSPCC Learning: Positive parenting

Read Next