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How to Market Your Ebook and Drive Leads

How to Market Your Ebook and Drive Leads

With the rise of digital content, marketers have been forced to adapt in order to continue to reach consumers. Because of increased content saturation, it’s no longer beneficial for your business to keep running mediocre campaigns or write shallow blog posts that offer little to the consumer.

While there are many ways to take your content to the next level – including infographics and podcasts – the way that provides the most value to potential customers, or clients, is through the use of eBooks.

In a time when people do extensive research before making a purchase – 81 percent of consumers research online before buying, according to a 2014 retail study – an information-filled eBook puts them at ease and allows your authority and knowledge to shine through. In the end, you have the opportunity to drive high-quality leads while building trust, loyalty, and brand-recognition.

If you haven’t attempted to write and market your eBook yet, this is the guide for you.

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First, Ask Yourself: What Value Does an eBook Provide?

An eBook is an electronic version of a book, designed specifically for you to download and read on a digital device—computer, mobile phone or iPad. eBooks for businesses are a unique marketing tool because they exist to deliver expertise and often entertainment to your target audience.

Because they are the opposite of a hard sell, they’re often not viewed as a direct marketing tactic by consumers, making them more effective at cultivating leads. The best part is, they’re effectiveness is easy to track.

According to the Content Marketing Institute, eBooks are easily quantifiable because eBooks containing links make it easy for businesses to track their success and ROI for marketing efforts.

Lead-Driving Tip: Use Google Analytics, or whichever tracking tool you prefer, to tag each link and then track which ones drive the most clicks. Use this information to create a new eBook that’s better optimized down the road.

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How Do You Write an eBook?

Before drafting an eBook, it’s important to consider the topic and the audience you’re writing for. Work to solve a problem or answer a question that your audience might have about your industry. For example: how to work out on the go, how to stay healthy during the holidays, and quick home workouts would all be great topics for fitness professionals.

Keep these other ideas in mind as you determine a topic and write the content:

  • The topic has to be something you’re very familiar with and can offer valuable knowledge on.
  • While it should be related to you and your industry, it should not solely be written about your product or the services you offer.
  • Sprinkle links to your website and call-to-actions (CTAs) throughout the book. Be sure to include a CTA at the end as well. While you don’t want to be outright sales-y, you do want to remind readers that you sell a product or provide a service that they want.
  • Don’t forget to brand the eBook as well with your logo, color scheme, images, and even font. The more connected it is to your brand, the more effective it will be at driving leads.

Lead-Driving Tip: Put a small version of your logo on every page, along with a page number. This subtle messaging can go a long way in reminding readers of your potential value to them, as they’ll connect what they’re learning to your brand.

Market & Promote to Generate Leads

After you’ve done the work and published your eBook, you have to drive traffic to it in order to generate leads. The best practices to market your eBook involve a multi-channel approach. However, don’t start funneling money toward traffic just yet.

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Keep these tips in mind as you prepare for marketing:

  • Build an attractive landing page where the eBook and sign-up form will live. If you don’t have a separate landing page, you’re limiting the promotional possibilities.
  • The medium and design of your promotional methods will vary—Facebook post, versus blog article, versus Tweet—but the foundation of information will come directly from your eBook.
  • Test the download form as you go, by asking for different pieces of information. For example, people may not be interested in providing their name, email, phone number, and address to download your eBook (in which case you’d see a low number of downloads), but they may be willing to provide their name and email (in which case you may see a spike in downloads). This will allow you to determine friction-points to optimize your efforts.

If you want to choose just one marketing method, consider Facebook ads. The targeting options are extensive, allowing you to serve ads to people who are almost guaranteed to be interested in your eBook topic.

Lead-Driving Tip: Test all promotional funnels for one month and then narrow it down to just one or two outlets where you found the greatest concentration of high-quality leads coming through. This will ideally allow you be effective with less money.

Email Marketing is Essential

While you do want to reach new customers with your eBook, don’t forget about trying to reach your existing customers with email marketing. “We developed a very successful email marketing campaign that consisted of convenient snippets from the book to current customers,” explains Paul Moore, author of The Definitive Guide to Smith Mountain Lake Real Estate. “Our audience views us as the experts and we’ve seen a very tangible response from our eBook.”

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These eBooks can help to strengthen your relationship with existing clients and work to build that brand loyalty so that the next time they are ready to purchase—you’ll come to mind. After spending time and money on creating a great eBook, it’s smart to get as much mileage from it as you can, and this is a great way to do that.

Lead-Driving Tip: Segment previous buyers to determine who would benefit the most from various parts of the eBook. Consider re-purposing these into blog posts or informative emails that you can then send to those specific clients.

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Last Updated on March 29, 2021

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

The Dream Type Of Manager

My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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“Okay…”

That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

The Bully

My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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The Invisible Boss

This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

The Micro Manager

The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

The Over Promoted Boss

The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

The Credit Stealer

The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

1. Keep evidence

Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

2. Hold regular meetings

Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

Good luck!

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