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6 Ways To Defeat Bad Credit Score

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6 Ways To Defeat Bad Credit Score

Know in advance: it won’t be easy. Improving credit scores are not immediate, and will require a hefty length of time to fix. This is because lenders, institutions, and issuers evaluate your past years’ behavior and actions, taking your entire credit history into account.

Not everyone has great credit, and there’s no shame in that. Of course, life happens, and there are circumstances some people genuinely cannot avoid. It’s a tragic credit scenario that’s happened to many people.

A typical business scenario is in the construction industry where surety bond come into play when contract price exceeds $100k.

“A surety (insurance company) bond is necessary to make sure that business owners (principal) performing the task follow specific requirements as laid in contract by the oblige (entity).”

Surety will weigh the risks of “taking you on” depending on your credit score – and decide whether or not your credit is worth the hassle of issuing you a bond or not. So, your credit score will determine the fate of your business.

If your credit score is above 750… congratulations! You have excellent credit. Any account below 650 is generally considered to be less-than-appealing to issuers and lenders.

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At the lower end of the spectrum, people around the 300-600 mark aren’t doing so well. Where do you fall?

Below are several ways to help you increase your credit score so you can get back in your lender’s good graces.

1. Check Your Score

Not knowing what is happening on your credit reports is like not knowing what you spend your money on. It is simply bad practice, and spells disaster for your bottom line. Be sure to check for free annual credit reports every few months or so and stay up to date.

Something to keep in mind when you’re reviewing your scores is to see how much revolving credit you have, versus how much you actually use. The lower the percentage – the better your credit rating.

Please be sure to see if your credit card issuer accepts multiple payments over the course of a month. Certain issuers report the balance on your statement to the bureau. So, if you pay full balances every month, only one balance will be actually reported.

2. Keep Calm And Relax

No matter how annoying it may be to see negative information every time you get your credit reports, keep in mind that this information often has less impact on your credit scores over time.

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Negative information on your reports have less impact on your credit scores the more time passes. Barrett Burns, CEO of VantageScore, states that just because information stays for seven years, doesn’t mean that information is relevant each year.

For example, let’s suggest you miss a payment (which probably happened – it’s sometimes impossible to keep up to date in today’s world). Your score may drop, but will take around a year and a half for you to recover fully – falling far short of the “7 Year Fear”.

In fact, it’s generally wiser to focus on your good debt (that is, debt that you’ve handled well and paid). Focus on your good payments, it will outweigh your bad scores. Keep in mind that bad scores are, well, bad, but they are not a doomsday scenario that many people make them out to be.

Credit card expert John Ulzheimer suggests keeping old debt and good accounts on for as long as they are possibly allowed. The takeaway: do not close old accounts, whether you have a good or bad score.

3. Don’t Open Too Many Accounts

Opening new accounts rapidly destroys your credit. This is because newer accounts lower your average account’s age – widening the overall effect of your scores. Not to mention that it looks risky to credit card issuers (to them, they think you’re a scam artist for opening up new accounts).

Plus, new accounts—in all likelihood—won’t raise your credit score.

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4. Don’t Close Unused Accounts

Regardless of your good debt, bad debt, and credit score, closing accounts won’t remove your bad debt. We can equate this to asking your high school to remove your grades from report cards.

Closed accounts still show up on your overall credit report, and do more harm than good, as it shows issuers that you’re unreliable.

Closing unused credit cards accounts is an ineffective strategy for raising your scores. It simply won’t. In fact, many people have had their credit scores lowered by doing exactly that.

5. Go Fully Automatic

One way of doing this is by setting up auto-payment, or payment reminders so that you never miss them. Similar to setting up automatic payment for bills to be withdrawn from your bank account on certain dates.

I personally have a hard time remembering important matters such as these, even in my daily life. I cannot stress enough how important weekend reminders (even daily reminders) via Google Calendar are.

If you’re wary of going fully automatic, build a schedule for yourself using task management software such as Trello or Asana. I recommend Trello, as it’s an intuitive and easy-to-use system for managing tasks and to-do lists. It fits my on-the-go needs and lets me adjust my schedule accordingly.

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6. Don’t Be A Risk

For whatever reason, whatsoever, do not risk damaging your score. This means trying your hardest not to miss any payment, or suddenly paying in smaller amounts, or infrequently charging more. Maintain a good score by being consistent with your payment dates and payment amounts.

However, taking cash advances might make your card issuer wary without hurting your score. Know this: charging businesses to your card that give second doubt to your money-handling abilities also paint you as a suspicious client.

Dave Jones, former president of the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies (AICCCA) warns that you do not, under any circumstance, give the impression that you’re a risk. As with anything in life.

Conclusion

Managing your bad credit scores isn’t as troublesome as many people make it out to be. All it requires is a determination and will to make your payments, consistently, as you agreed you would; not presenting yourself as a risk; adamantly refusing the temptation to open several accounts or close old ones; keeping your sanity as you handle your credit score.

Featured photo credit: via pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

Some easy ways to save money:

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  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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