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How to Keep Your Workers Focused On Work (And Not Their Phones)

How to Keep Your Workers Focused On Work (And Not Their Phones)

Everyone believes that technology is this great productivity enhancer, and there is no doubt that we possess more information at our fingertips than ever before. But experts have talked about a “productivity paradox” for years as they note that the rise of new technologies has not enhanced worker productivity by much.

There are many possible reasons for why this paradox exists, but there is no doubt that part of it can be attributed to how workers can waste so much time on their computers and phones. This is not just goofing around on Facebook or playing games. Answering emails or texting can also distract workers from what they need to do.

An employer must ensure that his workers are productive and not wasting time on their phones all day, but that cannot be done by constantly watching over their shoulders. Here are a few tips to help your workers get enhanced by technology and not distracted.

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Handling “Project Fear”

One of the biggest challenges with phones is that they enable employees to feel productive even if they are not. Workers do want to feel that they accomplished something at the end of the day, but also dread the work they have to do when they stare at some big project you have assigned them. It is much easier to spend all day reading and responding to emails and texts to get that feeling of accomplishment.

While you may want to just hand your workers a project and let them work on it as they see fit, a more hands-on approach will help ensure that they do not get paralyzed and turn to their phones for help. There are numerous guides for how workers can take a big project and split it into smaller portions, and it may be best for you to take a proactive approach and split it yourself. Then you can hand your workers a smaller, more manageable portion which they can take care of in a reasonable timeframe before handing them the next portion.

Set and enforce a phone policy

Demanding that employees entirely refrain from using their phones while in the office is absurd and will lower morale. But if you set up a phone policy in advance and communicate it to your employees, it will show what is and is not acceptable.

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Sit down with management, human resources, and your IT department (nothing shows management to be out of touch faster than a phone policy which makes no technological sense). Determine what you are trying to do with your cell phone plan and what sorts of behaviors you are trying to stop. Entrepreneur has a good example of what a sample cell phone policy should look like.

Once a policy is in place, make sure that everyone knows about it. For example, have workers sign a form acknowledging that they received and have read the new policy. Do not be afraid to discipline employees who refuse to follow it, up to demanding that they relinquish cell phones if they continue to use it for personal reasons.

Allow for exceptions and breaks

If you set a cell phone policy, you have to do your best to ensure that the policy is enforced fairly. This includes management and you should make it clear that they are expected to follow the policies which they drafted.

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This is becoming easier with phone companies coming up with new technology that allows you to limit phone usage via software. But you should also understand that sometimes exceptions will need to be made. For example, employees with serious health issues should be permitted to use their phones to regularly speak with their doctor. You may also wish to grant privileges to employees with children so they can stay in regular contact.

In addition to these exceptions, make it clear when employees are allowed to use phones. If you give your employees regular, assigned break periods where they are allowed to use their phones, that will help them stop from taking an impromptu “five-minute break” to check Facebook on their phones that lasts 50 minutes.

Use your own cell phone less

As the one running a company, your own personal cell phone use can set an example of how others should treat their cell phones. If you are spending all of your time texting and on your phone, then your subordinates will conclude that such behavior is acceptable for themselves as well.

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Most people spend too much time fiddling with their cell phones anyways, and this sort of behavior is a serious distraction to your work regardless of how you are using it. Try to use your own phone as little as possible, and you will be stunned to realize just how much time you waste on it. And while you may not be able to convince all your workers that texting 24/7 is unnecessary, you will be able to set a positive example and encourage others to depend on superior face to face communication.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

What do I want to do with my life? It’s a question all of us think about at one point or another.

For some, the answer comes easily. For others, it takes a lifetime to figure out.

It’s easy to just go through the motions and continue to do what’s comfortable and familiar. But for those of you who seek fulfillment, who want to do more, these questions will help you paint a clearer picture of what you want to do with your life.

1. What are the things I’m most passionate about?

The first step to living a more fulfilling life is to think about the things that you’re passionate about.

What do you love? What fulfills you? What “work” do you do that doesn’t feel like work? Maybe you enjoy writing, maybe you love working with animals or maybe you have a knack for photography.

The point is, figure out what you love doing, then do more of it.

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2. What are my greatest accomplishments in life so far?

Think about your past experiences and the things in your life you’re most proud of.

How did those accomplishments make you feel? Pretty darn good, right? So why not try and emulate those experiences and feelings?

If you ran a marathon once and loved the feeling you had afterwards, start training for another one. If your child grew up to be a star athlete or musician because of your teachings, then be a coach or mentor for other kids.

Continue to do the things that have been most fulfilling for you.

3. If my life had absolutely no limits, what would I choose to have and what would I choose to do?

Here’s a cool exercise: Think about what you would do if you had no limits.

If you had all the money and time in the world, where would you go? What would you do? Who would you spend time with?

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These answers can help you figure out what you want to do with your life. It doesn’t mean you need millions of dollars to be happy though.

What it does mean is answering these questions will help you set goals to reach certain milestones and create a path toward happiness and fulfillment. Which leads to our next question …

4. What are my goals in life?

Goals are a necessary component to set you up for a happy future. So answer these questions:

Once you figure out the answers to each of these, you’ll have a much better idea of what you should do with your life.

5. Whom do I admire most in the world?

Following the path of successful people can set you up for success.

Think about the people you respect and admire most. What are their best qualities? Why do you respect them? What can you learn from them?

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You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.[1] So don’t waste your time with people who hold you back from achieving your dreams.

Spend more time with happy, successful, optimistic people and you’ll become one of them.

6. What do I not like to do?

An important part of figuring out what you want to do with your life is honestly assessing what you don’t want to do.

What are the things you despise? What bugs you the most about your current job?

Maybe you hate meetings even though you sit through 6 hours of them every day. If that’s the case, find a job where you can work more independently.

The point is, if you want something to change in your life, you need to take action. Which leads to our final question …

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7. How hard am I willing to work to get what I want?

Great accomplishments never come easy. If you want to do great things with your life, you’re going to have to make a great effort. That will probably mean putting in more hours the average person, getting outside your comfort zone and learning as much as you can to achieve as much as you can.

But here’s the cool part: it’s often the journey that is the most fulfilling part. It’s during these seemingly small, insignificant moments that you’ll often find that “aha” moments that helps you answer the question,

“What do I want to do with my life?”

So take the first step toward improving your life. You won’t regret it.

Featured photo credit: Andrew Ly via unsplash.com

Reference

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