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How to Develop Better Reading Habits

How to Develop Better Reading Habits

In a world where people often turn to video games, the Internet, and television for entertainment, developing good reading habits has grown even more important. A recent study found that reading fiction improves brain function, while another study shows that it can help in the brain development of children. If you are trying to get your kids more excited about books or even if you just want to read more often yourself, making literacy a regular part of your life can lead to an increase in reading enthusiasm for all ages.

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    Make a Date to Read

    Set up a schedule for reading and stick to it. Scheduling a time to read is crucial for creating positive reading habits, especially for children. The Alliance After School reports show that reading as little as 10 minutes a day can increase the literacy skills of children. Regardless of age, however, establishing a literary routine can help you learn to expect and be prepared by knowing what you are reading and plan ahead for your next book. To reinforce the habit, make sure you read at a specific time each day. For example, you could try cracking open a book after dinner every night or read during your lunch break. As long as you are able to to open your books at least once a day, you can choose whatever time of day you like.

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    Join a Reading Program

    Often practiced during the summer holidays, library reading programs encourage children to pursue coherent literacy habits, log their reading time, and receive rewards for their efforts. Children who participate in these programs from the age of 4 often continue to read for pleasure in adulthood. For adults, joining a book club can create a similar responsibility by offering an informal interactive book under discussion. Joining a book club will not only help to create a literary community, but can also help you practice critical thinking related to reading.

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    Try to Read the Type of Book You Like

    If you really want to develop the habit of reading, the first thing to do is to find books that you would find pleasure in reading. So I suggest you start trying out different types of books. Don’t go blindly by internet suggestions or just stick to critically acclaimed books initially. Many critically acclaimed books are for heavy readers and require a lot of  discipline and patience to complete. To acquire that kind of discipline, go for easy-reading, mass market novels first and then explore the horizon in other genres. Once you get over those kind of books, you can graduate to more complex ones thereafter.

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    Limit TV Time

    You or your children pulling away from the TV, smart phones, video games, and computers can remove a major obstacle and help you or your children to find time to read. Try taking away technology privileges until required reading time has been completed for the day. While the reward for reading will feel like television or the other form of technology you withheld until the reading was completed, over time you will learn to enjoy reading as well. The benefits of reading and the books will become the reward. If you want your children to read more, a positive example is by reading for pleasure yourself and keeping books around the house to remind you to read every day. Also, try to explain to your children why it is important to read for a brighter future, thereby making the future world better.

    Talking Books

    Talking and writing about what you read can help you with books and creative ideas. This is especially true for children who are still new to reading comprehensions. If your children are beginner readers, try to engage them in conversations about what books they are reading and help them reflect on the stories to generate excitement about their reading time. To help you deal with your thoughts about the books you read for yourself, try writing reviews for online bookstores, or join a social network like Goodreads, which allows users to share what books they read and discuss their reactions with others.

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    Last Updated on September 10, 2018

    Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

    Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

    We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

    Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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    Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

    Looking at images of loved ones

    While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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    In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

    Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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    Exercise

    Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

    Meditation

    Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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    In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

    When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

    With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

    Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

    Reference

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