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How to Develop Better Reading Habits

How to Develop Better Reading Habits

In a world where people often turn to video games, the Internet, and television for entertainment, developing good reading habits has grown even more important. A recent study found that reading fiction improves brain function, while another study shows that it can help in the brain development of children. If you are trying to get your kids more excited about books or even if you just want to read more often yourself, making literacy a regular part of your life can lead to an increase in reading enthusiasm for all ages.

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    Make a Date to Read

    Set up a schedule for reading and stick to it. Scheduling a time to read is crucial for creating positive reading habits, especially for children. The Alliance After School reports show that reading as little as 10 minutes a day can increase the literacy skills of children. Regardless of age, however, establishing a literary routine can help you learn to expect and be prepared by knowing what you are reading and plan ahead for your next book. To reinforce the habit, make sure you read at a specific time each day. For example, you could try cracking open a book after dinner every night or read during your lunch break. As long as you are able to to open your books at least once a day, you can choose whatever time of day you like.

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    Join a Reading Program

    Often practiced during the summer holidays, library reading programs encourage children to pursue coherent literacy habits, log their reading time, and receive rewards for their efforts. Children who participate in these programs from the age of 4 often continue to read for pleasure in adulthood. For adults, joining a book club can create a similar responsibility by offering an informal interactive book under discussion. Joining a book club will not only help to create a literary community, but can also help you practice critical thinking related to reading.

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    Try to Read the Type of Book You Like

    If you really want to develop the habit of reading, the first thing to do is to find books that you would find pleasure in reading. So I suggest you start trying out different types of books. Don’t go blindly by internet suggestions or just stick to critically acclaimed books initially. Many critically acclaimed books are for heavy readers and require a lot of  discipline and patience to complete. To acquire that kind of discipline, go for easy-reading, mass market novels first and then explore the horizon in other genres. Once you get over those kind of books, you can graduate to more complex ones thereafter.

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    Limit TV Time

    You or your children pulling away from the TV, smart phones, video games, and computers can remove a major obstacle and help you or your children to find time to read. Try taking away technology privileges until required reading time has been completed for the day. While the reward for reading will feel like television or the other form of technology you withheld until the reading was completed, over time you will learn to enjoy reading as well. The benefits of reading and the books will become the reward. If you want your children to read more, a positive example is by reading for pleasure yourself and keeping books around the house to remind you to read every day. Also, try to explain to your children why it is important to read for a brighter future, thereby making the future world better.

    Talking Books

    Talking and writing about what you read can help you with books and creative ideas. This is especially true for children who are still new to reading comprehensions. If your children are beginner readers, try to engage them in conversations about what books they are reading and help them reflect on the stories to generate excitement about their reading time. To help you deal with your thoughts about the books you read for yourself, try writing reviews for online bookstores, or join a social network like Goodreads, which allows users to share what books they read and discuss their reactions with others.

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    Last Updated on November 5, 2019

    How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

    How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

    Did you know that 75% of the population suffers from glossophobia? That scary sounding word is one of the most common phobia’s in the world, fear of public speaking.

    I’ll bet even as you are reading this, you are getting nervous thinking about giving a speech.

    I have got good news for you. In this article, I will share with you a step by step method on how to memorize a speech the smart way. Once you have this method down, your confidence in yourself to deliver a successful speech will increase substantially. Read on to feel well prepared the next time you have to memorize and deliver a speech.

    Common Mistakes of Memorizing a Speech

    Before we get to the actual process of how to memorize a speech the smart way, let’s look at the two most common mistakes many of us tend to make while preparing for a speech.

    Complete Memorization

    In an attempt to ensure they remember every detail, many people aim to completely memorize their speech. They practice it over and over until they have every single word burned into their brain.

    In many ways, this is understandable because most of us are naturally frightened of having to give a speech. When the time comes, we want to be completely and totally prepared and not make any mistakes.

    While this makes a lot of sense, it also comes with its own negative side. The downside to having your speech memorized word for word is that you sound like a robot when delivering the speech. You become so focused on remembering every single part that you lose the ability to inflect your speech to varying degrees, and free form the talk a bit when the situation warrants.

    Lack of Preparation

    The other side of the coin to complete memorization is people who don’t prepare enough. Because they don’t want to come off sounding like a robot, they decide they will mostly “wing it”.

    Sometimes they will write a few main points down on a piece of paper to remind themselves. They figure once they get going, the details will somehow fill themselves in under the big talking points while they are doing the talking.

    The problem is that unless this is a topic you know inside and out and have spoken on it many times, you’ll wind up missing key points. It’s almost a given that as soon as you are done with your speech, you’ll remember many things you should have brought up while talking.

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    There’s a good balance to be had between over and under preparing. Let’s now look at how to memorize a speech the smart way.

    How to Memorize a Speech (Step-by-Step Guide)

    1. Write Out Your Speech

    The first step in the process is to simply write out your speech.

    Many people like to write out the entire speech. Other people are more inclined to write their speech outline style. Whichever way your brain works best is the way you should write your speech.

    Personally, I like to break things down into the primary points I want to make, and then back up each major point with several details. Because my mind works this way, I tend to write out speeches, and articles for that matter, by doing an outline.

    Once I have the outline completed, I will then fill in several bullet points to back up each big topic.

    For instance, if I was going to give a speech on how to get in better shape my outline would look something like this:

    Benefits of being in shape

    • Point #1
    • Point #2
    • Point #3

    Exercise

    • Point #1
    • Point #2
    • Point #3

    Diet

    • Point #1
    • Point #2
    • Point #3

    Rest and hydration

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    • Point #1
    • Point #2
    • Point #3

    ConclusionNo need for points here, just a few sentences wrapping things up.

    As you might imagine, this step typically is the hardest because it’s not only the first step but it also involves the initial creation of the speech.

    2. Rehearse Your Speech

    Now that you’ve written your speech, or outline, it’s time to start saying it out loud. It’s completely fine to simply read what you’ve written line by line at this point. What you are working on doing is getting the outline and getting a feel for the speech.

    If you’ve written the entire speech out, you’ll be editing it while you are rehearsing it. Many times as we say things out loud, we realize that what we wrote needs to be changed and altered. This is how we work towards having a well rounded and smooth speech. Feel free to change things as needed while you are rehearsing your speech.

    If you are like me and you’ve written the outline, this is where some of the supporting bullet points will begin to come out. Normally, I will have written several bullet points under each main topic. But as I say it out loud, I will begin to fill in more and more details. I might scratch certain bullet points and add others. I might think of something new at this stage while I am listening to myself and want to add it.

    The key to remember here is that you laying the foundation for your awesome speech. At this point, it’s a work in progress, you are getting the key pieces in place.

    3. Memorize the Bigger Parts

    As you are rehearsing your speech, you want to focus on memorizing the bigger parts, or the main points.

    Going back to my example of how to get in better shape, I’d want to ensure I have memorized my primary points. These include the benefits of being in shape, exercise, diet, rest and hydration, and the conclusion. These are the main points I want to make and I will then fill in further details. I’ve got to ensure I know these very well first and foremost.

    By practicing your major points, you are building the framework for your speech. After you have this solid outline in place, you’ll continue by adding in the details to round things out.

    4. Fill In the Details

    Now that you have the big chunks memorized, it’s time to work on memorizing the details. These detail points will provide support and context for your major points. You can work on this all at once or break it down to the details that support each major point.

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    For example, the details I might have under the “exercise” big point might include such things as cardio, weights, how many times a week to exercise, how long to actually exercise, and several examples of actual exercises. In this example, I have 5 detail points to memorize to support my major point of “exercise”.

    It’s a good idea to test yourself regularly as you are rehearsing your speech. Ask yourself:

    What are the 5 detail points I want to talk about that support my 3rd main point?

    You need to be able to fire those off quickly. Until you can do this, you won’t be able to associate each of the details with the main point.

    You have to be able to have them grouped together in your mind so that it comes out naturally in your speech. So that when you think of main point #2, you automatically think of the 4 supporting details associated with it.

    Keep working at this stage until you can run through your speech completely several times and remember all of your big points and the supporting details.

    Once you can do that with relative ease, it will be time for the final step, working on your delivery.

    5. Work on Your Delivery

    You’ve got the bulk of the work done now. You’ve written your speech and rehearsed enough times to have not only your main points memorized but also your supporting details. In short, you should have your speech almost done.

    There’s one more step in how to memorize a speech the smart way. The final component is to work on how you deliver your speech.

    For the most part, you can go give your speech now. After all, you have it memorized. If you want to ensure you do it right, you’ll want to hone how you are delivering your speech.

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    You work on your delivery by rehearsing and running through it a number of times and making tweaks along the way. These tweaks or changes may be are’s where you’d want to pause for effect.

    If you’ve found you have used one word 5 times in one paragraph, you might want to swap it out for a similar word a few times to keep it fresh.

    Sometimes while working on this part, I’ve thought of a great story that’s happened to me that I can incorporate to make my point even better.

    When you work on your delivery, you are basically giving your speech a personality as well.

    The Bottom Line

    And there you have it, a step by step approach on how to memorize a speech the smart way.

    The next time you are asked to give a speech don’t let glossophobia rear its familiar head. Instead, remember this easy to use guide to help craft a powerful speech.

    Using the method shown here will help you deliver your next speech with increased confidence.

    More About Public Speaking

    Featured photo credit: Anna Sullivan via unsplash.com

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