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Having An Unbearable Toothache? Here Are 5 Quick Remedies To Try At Home

Having An Unbearable Toothache? Here Are 5 Quick Remedies To Try At Home

Even if you force yourself to work, an unbearable toothache can stop you dead in your tracks. Of course, the best option is to go to your dentist, but, what your toothache presents itself before your dentist’s office opens on after it closes? One option you can do is take some painkillers. However, relying on over-the-counter medicine is not that wise, especially if you are currently taking other medications. You should always consult your dentist or your physician before taking any painkillers.

Aside from that, you’re left with one more course of action to address an unbearable toothache. Look for items in your house that can be used to quell the pain you’re feeling. Go alternative!

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These home remedies will save you from the pain of this kind of dental issue:

Soothe With Salt Solution

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    ISTOCK/HEIKEKAMPE

    Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a cup of boiling water. When mixed this way, salt and water transform into a pain-killing mouthwash. How does it work? Salt solution cleanses away debris that may be irritating your teeth and gums and it helps reduce the swelling. Swish the solution around your mouth for around 30 seconds before spitting it out. The salt solution will clean around the tooth area and will draw out the fluid that might be causing the swelling. Repeat swishing as needed.

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    Try Tea Therapy

    tea-tootheache-remedy_04
      Photo Credit: teaneeds.com

      The nice flavor and numbing power of peppermint tea is great for your toothache because it alleviates the ache. Mix one teaspoon of dried peppermint leaves in a cup of boiling water and steep for about 20 minutes. After the tea cools down, swish it around in your mouth, then spit it out. Another tip—the oil is a known remedy for headaches. Also, the astringent tannins in strong black tea may help alleviate pain by reducing swelling. For this natural remedy, put a warm, wet tea bag against the affected tooth for temporary relief.

      Comfort With Clove Oil

      clove-oil_tootheache_remedy
        Photo Credit: natural living ideas

        Numb nerves with the use of a traditional remedy—cloves. Its primary chemical compound, eugenol, is a natural anesthetic. However, you need to be careful when using clove oil because if you pour the oil directly on the aching area, you intensify the pain. This happens if you accidentally put it on a sensitive gum tissue or on your tongue. Here’s how to do it: put two drops of clove oil on a cotton ball and put it against the aching tooth until the pain goes away. Also, you can get a pinch of powdered clove to put on the tooth or put a whole clove on the tooth. Chew the whole clove just a bit to release its oil and keep it there for 1/2 hour, or until the pain stops.

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        Gently Dull The Pain With Ginger-Cayenne Paste

        cayenne_tootheache_remedy_01
          Photo Credit: Jack Moreh

          Make a paste out of ginger and cayenne by mixing the two with water. Roll a cotton ball into the paste just enough to saturate it. Put it on the aching tooth while avoiding your gums and tongue. Let it stay there until the pain recedes—or as long as you can handle it. Don’t forget, the concoction is prone to burn. Also, you might want to try these spices separately, since both are powerful painkillers. The main chemical component of cayenne—capsaicin—has been found to help block pain messages from reaching the brain.

          Ice, Ice It Baby

          ice-it-tootheache_remedy
            Photo Credit: coffee via pixabay

            Drop a small ice cube inside a plastic bag, wrap it with thin cloth, and apply this to your painful tooth. Do it for around 15 minutes. This will numb the nerves. You can alternate the ice pack between your cheek and the achy tooth. Also, you can try this: massage your hand with an ice cube. A folklore claims that doing this will ease up the pain. How? When the nerves in your fingers send “freezing signals” to your cerebrum, they might overpower the pain signals emanating from your tooth. How to do it? Use a thin cloth to wrap an ice cube and massage it in between your forefinger and your thumb. Target the fleshy area there.

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            Just be reminded, these are temporary remedies. It’s strongly suggested that you visit your dentist as soon as you can after this painful episode.

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            Anthony Dejolde

            Freelance Writer/Blogger/Copywriter

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            Last Updated on October 23, 2018

            Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

            Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

            My mother was a great knitter and produced some wonderful garments such as Aran sweaters which were extremely fashionable when I was young. She also knitted while my father drove, which caused great amusement. I often wondered why she did that but I think I know the answer now.

            Knitting is good for your mental health, according to some research studies. The Washington Post mentions a 2013 survey of about 3,500 knitters who were asked how they felt after a knitting session. Over 80% of them said they definitely felt happier. It is not a totally female occupation as more and more men take it up to get the same benefits. Harry Styles (One Direction) enjoys knitting. So does Russell Crowe although he does it to help him with anger management!

            The Neural Knitwork Project

            In Australia, Neural Knitworks was started to encourage people to knit and also become aware of neuroscience and mental health issues. Knit-ins were organized but garments were not the only things created. The knitters produced handmade neurons (1,665 of them!) to make a giant brain. The 2015 project will make more neural knitted networks (neural knitworks) and they will be visible online. You can see some more examples of woolly neurons on the Neural Knitworks Facebook page.

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            While people knitted, crocheted and crafted yarn, they listened to experts talking about mental health issues such as addiction, dementia, depression, and how neurons work.

            The knitting and neural connection

            The human brain has about 80 billion neurons. Learning new skills, social interaction, and physical activity all help to forge neural connections which keep the brain healthy and active. They are creating networks to control movement and make memories. The knitters learn that as they create the woollen neurons, their own neurons are forming new pathways in their brains. Their creations are mimicking the processes in their brains to a certain extent. At the same time, their brains are registering new and interesting information as they learn interesting facts about the brain and how it works. I love the knitworks and networks pun. What a brilliant idea!

            More mental health benefits from knitting

            Betsan Corkhill is a physiotherapist and has published some results of completed studies on her website, appropriately named Stitchlinks. She conducted some experiments herself and found that knitting was really helpful in reducing panic and anxiety attacks.

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            “You are using up an awful lot of brain capacity to perform a coordinated series of movements. The more capacity you take up by being involved in a complex task, the less capacity you have for bad thoughts.”- Betsan Corkhill

            Knitters feel happier and in a better mood

            Ann Futterman-Collier, Well Being Lab at Northern Arizona University, is very interested in how textile therapy (sewing, knitting, weaving and lace-making) can play an important role in mood repair and in lifting depressive states.

            She researched 60 women and divided them into three different groups to do some writing, meditating and work with textiles. She monitored their heartbeat, blood pressure and saliva production. The women in the textiles group had the best results when their mood was assessed afterwards. They were in a better mood and had managed to reduce their negative thoughts better than those in the writing and meditation groups.

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            “People who were given the task to make something actually had less of an inflammatory response in the face of a ‘stressor’.” – Dr. Futterman Collier

            The dopamine effect on our happiness

            Our brains produce a chemical called dopamine. This helps us to feel happy, more motivated, and assists also with focus and concentration. We get a boost of dopamine after sex, food, exercise, sleep, and creative activities.

            There are medications to increase dopamine but there are lots of ways we can do it naturally. Textile therapy and crafting are the easiest and cheapest. We can create something and then admire it. In addition, this allows for a little bit of praise and congratulations. Although this is likely not your goal, all these can boost our dopamine and we just feel happier and more fulfilled. These are essential in facing new challenges and coping with disappointment in life.

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            “Sometimes, people come up to me when I am knitting and they say things like, “Oh, I wish I could knit, but I’m just not the kind of person who can sit and waste time like that.” How can knitting be wasting time? First, I never just knit; I knit and think, knit and listen, knit and watch. Second, you aren’t wasting time if you get a useful or beautiful object at the end of it.” – Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit’s End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much.

            If you thought knitting and textiles were for old ladies, think again!

            Featured photo credit: DSC_0012/Mary-Frances Main via flickr.com

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