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What You Can Do If You Have Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (Apart From Medication)

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What You Can Do If You Have Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (Apart From Medication)

If you or someone you know have recently been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Doctors may prescribe birth control pills or diabetes medications in order to regulate hormonal production. And you may wonder, is taking pills the only thing I can do? Do I have to take pills for the rest of my whole life?

Medication is important and you should consult your doctors whenever you want to stop it. The good news is apart from medication, there are other things you can do that are proven to help.

First of All, What’s Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome occurs when the female hormones estrogen and progesterone are out of balance. Additionally, the body produces too much of the male hormone androgen.

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This hormonal imbalance causes numerous cysts to grow on the ovaries. In turn, these cysts can cause complications with menstrual cycles, physical appearance, heart health, and fertility. Some of the symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome include: weight gain, anxiety, irregular menstrual cycles, excessive hair on the face and chest, and depression. [1]

How to Treat Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Without Medication

1. Lose Weight

Time to start that diet
    Source

    What does losing weight have to do with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome? Well, the syndrome may cause you to put on pounds. Extra weight increases your blood sugar levels and can cause your menstrual cycle to be irregular. Losing around 10 pounds can help regulate hormone production.

    Unfortunately, losing weight is more difficult for women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Eating a healthy diet and exercising frequently can help.

    2. Eat a High Protein Diet

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    salmon-dish-food-meal-46239

      Source

      One of the best ways to lose weight with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is to increase your protein consumption. In a 2011 study, researchers monitored the weight of 57 women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome for a 6-month period. The participants followed 2 separate diets:

      1. More than 40% of calories from protein and 30% from fat.
      2. Less than 15% of calories from protein and 30% from fat.

      At the end of the 6 months, 27 women remained in the study. Those who followed the high protein diet lost more weight, had smaller waistlines, and significantly lowered their blood glucose levels. [2]

      To follow this dietary plan, first cut out high sugar desserts, soft drinks, and refined carbohydrates. Replace these with whole grains like quinoa, brown rice, and oats, although at a reduced intake. Increase the amount of healthy protein in your diet by eating more hard-boiled eggs, beans, nuts, and other lean proteins like steamed fish.

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      3. Get More Exercise

      pexels-photo-3

        Moderate exercise can help reduce the symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. This is because physical activity lowers blood sugar levels, preventing insulin resistance. Additionally, it helps you maintain and lose weight. [3]

        One of the best ways to get more exercise is by walking. Try walking around your neighborhood in the evenings, parking far from store entrances, and taking the stairs instead of the elevator any chance you have.

        4. Take Vitamin and Mineral Supplements

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        capsule-1079838_1280

          Source

          Some research indicates that increasing vitamin D and calcium can relieve irregular menstrual cycles and lower body weight in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

          One study looked at 100 infertile women with the diagnosis who were taking metformin, a medicine commonly used to treat diabetes. A group of 50 women took only metformin. The other group took the same prescription of metformin and in addition, 1,000 mg of calcium and 100,000 IU of vitamin D.  The women who took supplements experienced an increase in weight loss and improved menstrual regularity. [4]

          Before you take on any of these suggestions, make sure to consult your doctor. Remember, medications are often necessary for treating Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. You can follow these tips in conjunction with your prescription plan. In the long run, they can help you improve your health.

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          Featured photo credit: Leah Kelley via pexels.com

          Reference

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          Amber Pariona

          EFL Teacher, Lifehack Writer, English/Spanish Translator, MPA

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          Last Updated on November 22, 2021

          Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

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          Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

          Thanksgiving, a day of pure gluttony, football, and possible uncomfortable situations with family members that you may or may not like. Oh, yeah, and the whole “know and reflect on what it is to be thankful and grateful.”

          During the holiday season many people forget what this time of year is bout and are too worried about getting the “early-bird” deals on Black Friday and making sure that they have the perfect gifts for their loved ones. I am sort of a “Grinch” when it comes to the holiday season, mostly because of that mentality by many of the poeple around me.

          But instead of being grinch-like this holiday season, I decided to simplify things and get back to what this time of year is actually is about; being thankful for what I have and what I can give.

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          Simplify

          I’m not a “minimalist” in any real sense, but in the last few months the talks of Patrick Rhone and others have got me to rethink my stance. Can you really have too much stuff?

          Absolutely.

          And with all that stuff comes the burden and the weight of it on your back.

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          If you feel that the things around you are out of control, maybe it’s time to simplify and be thankful and grateful for what you have and use. Here are a few things that you can do to simplify:

          • You know those gadgets in the drawer that you said you were going to sell? Well, time to get the listing on eBay and sell them. Or, send them to a place like Gazelle. Even if they are old and won’t get money, you can at least recycle them.
          • Get rid of things you don’t need. Like old books, clothes, tools, etc. Have something that’s been laying around forever with no use? Donate it to a charity or church. If you aren’t using it, someone else could be.
          • Find your productivity tools and stick with them. Use tools and gadgets that serve multiple purposes so you can simplify your tool set.

          Be Mindful

          You don’t have to be a master Buddhist or meditator to be mindful (although, it can definitely help). Being mindful comes down to being cognizant of the present and not keeping yourself in the past or future. It’s about living in the moment and being aware of yourself and everything around you. It’s just being.

          Without getting too “California” on you, it is super important to be mindful during the holiday rush. Rather than worrying about the things that you forgot at your house on the way to relatives or thinking about the next stop in your endless holiday travels, just breath and think about what you are currently doing.

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          Spend the time with your family and friends and don’t crush the moment. Try not to concentrate so hard on getting the perfect photo of the “awesome moment” of the day and actually miss the awesome moment.

          Being mindful over the holidays will help you be with your families, friends, and yourself allowing you to enjoy your time.

          Reflect

          As the year is coming to a close (yes, it really is that close!) it’s a great time to start reflecting on what you have accomplished and what you haven’t. Within the next few weeks we will have a more throrough reflection article here at Lifehack.org, but reflecting every now and then over your holiday break is a great way to see where you have been doing well in your life and where you need to improve.

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          Reflection shouldn’t be used to “get down” on yourself. Reflection should be used to take an honset inventory of what you have accomplished, how you handeled situations, and what you can do better. If you journal everyday (a daily form of reflection) it may be a good time to start going over some of the things that you have written and start to put together a year’s end journal entry. I mean, how else will you write your autobiography?

          But, seriously, reflecting on yourself makes you aware of your successes and faults and helps you plan and make goals for the coming year. It makes you a better person.

          So, while you are stuffing your face with bird, stuffing, and mashed taters’, remember that the holidays are much more than the superficial things. Use this holiday to become a better person.

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          Featured photo credit: Libby Penner via unsplash.com

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