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5 Educational Games to Help Your Kids’ Mental Development

5 Educational Games to Help Your Kids’ Mental Development

Are you surprised hat educational games can go a long way in helping your kids development? Let me show you how educational games can fast-track your child’s development. Let’s take a look at this:

Researchers discovered that kids who scored higher on a test or in the exam are an expert of symbolic gameplay.
Due to the growing popularity of these educational games, it is important to learn what effects they may have on your children, and what may moderate these effects. This article will show you different kinds of educational games and the positive impact they can have on your kids. Baby gender differences and parental monitoring over child’s gaming are studied as potential moderators.

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The important thing is to heed how and why educational games play can impact your kid’s development. By distinction, children living in literate communities are encouraged to engage in complex, pretend play, Such play might improve a child’s academic readiness, and enhance his or her long-term economic prospects.

Anger control is an essential public health problem, and it has remained stated that anger-related behavior, such as violence and hostility, this is one of the more common reasons children are brought in for mental health services. Engaging your kids with exciting and fun educational games can go a way to stimulate their mind and get it busy, and I can tell you that their mental reasoning will improve much more quickly.
Here are 5 educational games you can engage your children in:

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1. The ABC’s Zoo Learning Game

This involved list of animals representing one alphabet each and kids are expected to identify each alphabet and memorize them. If this process is replicated every day, I can bet you that your children will be familiar or they will be able to recognize letters whenever they see it in class, test hall or any other place.

2. The Pizza Game
pizza-game

    In this game the pizza needs eight toppings—and your child is expected to assist, and examine simple computing using pizza toppings in this entertaining math game. Preschoolers practice counting toppings one-by-one, aided by obvious clues to help them get each sequence rightThis solid counting game helps kids master counting. This game provides a framework for success. With addition difficulty levels, this game can help train your children in recognizing numbers.

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    3. Complex Lowercase Alphabet Bingo Game
    lowercase-alphabet

      When kids start learning the alphabet, it is normal for lots of kids to flip and reverse characters. This shows that letters such as p,q, and d were especially hard to remember. Try this leveling bingo game to let your child build lowercase letter identification skills, especially for letters d, b, p, q and g. This will help your kids to be able to differentiate upper case from the lower case letters.

      4. Hard hats on Game
      numer-demolition

        Children practice recognizing numbers 11 to 20 in this demolition game. Every time they identify a number, Foxy and Rolex go together to hit out a brick. Answer enough questions, and the old building will fall. Kids love the silly animation so much; they won’t realize that they’re retaining necessary number recognition skills.

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        5. Uppercase Alphabet Hopper
        upper-case

          First, you will hear an index of the letter, then click on the corresponding capital letter to send bug-bug jumping and splashing in the mud. Once your child gets their cards down, they will be ready to play this game, and it is an excellent way to train the recognition of upper case letters without really having to get dirty in the mud!

          If the above-mentioned games are effectively utilized, you will be so amazed by how brilliant and mentally developed your kids will be, and they will stand out among their mates in school or in the society they belong to. There are still a lot of educational games on the internet to help your kids develop faster.

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          Last Updated on August 29, 2018

          5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

          5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

          Journaling is one of the most useful personal development tools around. Not only does it help us process emotions and experiences, work through internal conflicts and improve our self-awareness, it also provides us with a way to keep a day-to-day record of our lives. Traditionally an activity limited to pen and paper, the expansion of consumer technology has enabled journaling to go digital.

          Saving your journaling entries online enables you to access them from anywhere, without having to carry a notebook and pen around, and provides you with digital features, like tagging and search functions.

          Here are a list of five online journaling tools you can use to bring your practice into the modern age:

          1. 750words

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          750 words

            750words is a free online journaling tool created by Buster Benson. The site is based on the idea of “Morning Pages”; a journaling tool Julia Cameron suggests in her creativity course The Artist’s Way. Cameron advises aspiring creatives to start each morning with three pages of stream-of-consciousness writing to clear away the mental clutter, leaving you with a clearer mind to face the day.

            750 words is the three-page digital equivalent (assuming the average person writes 250 words per page) and lets you store all your journaling online. Each morning, you’ll receive a prompt asking you to write your 750 words, and the site keeps track of various statistics associated with your entries. The site uses a Regressive Imagery Dictionary to calculate the emotional content from your posts and provides feedback on features like your mood, and most commonly used words.

            750 words is simple to set up and is ideal for anyone who finds it challenging to maintain a consistent journaling practice. The site uses a number of incentives to motivate users, including animal badges awarded to journalers who complete a certain number of days in a row, leader boards, and opt-in monthly challenges.

            2. Ohlife

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            ohlife

              Ohlife is designed to make online journaling as easy as possible. Once you’ve signed up for your free account, the website will send you an email each day asking “How did your day go?” Simply reply to the email with as much or as little detail as you like, and your response will be stored on your account, ready to view next time you log in.

              Ohlife’s appeal lies in its simplicity: no stats, no social sharing, no complicated organisational systems—the site is designed to provide you with a private, online space. Simply respond to the email each day (or skip the days you’re busy) and Ohlife will do the rest.

              3. Oneword

              oneword

                OneWord is a fun online tool that provides you with a single word as a prompt and gives you sixty seconds to write about it. The concept’s aim is to help writers learn how to flow, and the prompts range from the everyday mundane to the profound.

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                Oneword is not a private journaling tool: if you sign up, your answers will be published on the site’s daily blog, which contains a stream of users’ answers, and might be used by Oneword in the future. If you’d rather keep your answers to yourself, you can still use the tool for fun without giving out any personal details.

                4. Penzu

                  Penzu is a journaling tool that allows you to store your journaling notes online. The service also offers mobile apps for iOS, Android and Blackberry, so you can journal on the go and save your notes to your account. The basic service is free, however you can upgrade to Penzu Pro and get access to additional features, including military-grade encryption and the ability to save and sync data through your mobile, for $19 per year.

                  With either version of Penzu, you can insert pictures, and add tags and comments to entries, as well as search for older entries. You can set your posts to be private and viewable by you only, or share them with others.

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                  5. Evernote

                  Evernote isn’t a purpose-built journaling tool, however its features make it perfect for keeping your journaling notes in one safe place. With the ability to keep separate “notebooks”, tag your entries, include pictures, audio and web clipping, Evernote will appeal to journalers who want to include more formats than just text in their entries.

                  Available online within a web browser, and as a stand-alone desktop app, the service also comes with a series of mobile apps covering almost every device available. These allow you to make notes on the go and sync between the mobile and browser versions of the app.

                  For additional features, including text recognition and the ability to collaborate on Notebooks, you can upgrade to Evernote’s premium service, which costs $5 per month.

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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