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10 Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes

10 Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes
Thanksgiving is a notorious holiday for calories, carbs and other dreaded dietary words. Add that to the overwhelming portions, and you have a recipe for quick weight gain. With more awareness of chronic illnesses being linked to obesity and poor dietary choices, it is important to focus on eating healthy during the holidays. Here are a few suggestions for Thanksgiving.

1. Healthy Apple Crisp

Skip the fattening crusts and sugary pie filling with this surprisingly satisfying dessert, which is featured in Dr. Oz’s recipe blog. It calls for Stevia, oatmeal, applesauce and spices. Serve it with a dessert latte made from low-fat milk and Stevia.

2. Couscous-Stuffed Peppers

Add a splash of festive fall colors to your table with this protein-packed recipe. You will need several colored bell peppers, and you must remove the tops for baking. The couscous stuffing includes feta cheese, currants, spinach and several spices. The Food Network provides a great recipe.

3. Maple Cranberry Sweet Potatoes

Good Housekeeping features a healthier spin on sweet potatoes. You can reduce the butter measurement to one-half of the requirement and use butter that is infused with olive oil for a healthier option.

4. Turkey Wraps

For an appetizer, you can use a whole-wheat tortilla. Put some low-fat cream cheese in a thin layer on the tortilla. Add diced turkey, black beans and cranberry sauce for a scrumptious snack.

5. Stuffed Butternut Squash

These squash halves are perfect if you want a side dish that is both aesthetically pleasing and delicious. This recipe from 12 Tomatoes includes mushrooms, quinoa, Parmesan cheese and several herbs and spices.

6. Spiced Cranberry Apple Cider

Use two bottles of apple juice and one bottle of cranberry juice. Both should be naturally sweetened. Cut four oranges into thin slices. Add all ingredients in a large pot. Throw in about 10 cinnamon sticks, a few slices of fresh ginger and a teaspoon of allspice. Let it simmer for 15 minutes, and let it cool before serving.

7. Quinoa Stuffing

Since traditional stuffing often tops the list for being unhealthy, try this recipe for a much healthier and equally delicious side. It calls for cranberries, pistachios, butternut squash, spinach and some scrumptious spices.

8. Pumpkin Bowl Squash Soup

If you want to impress your guests with a fun meal starter, this Food Network recipe will not disappoint. You use small baking pumpkins to create bowls, and you combine the inside contents with squash, onion and cream. You can substitute milk for the cream and olive oil for the butter without sacrificing too much flavor quality.

9. Healthy Green Bean Casserole

With its heavy canned soup and high-calorie breaded onions, traditional green bean casserole is a diet killer. If you want that same smoky mushroom flavor with crispy onions, try this fresher vegan recipe from Hummusapien. The white wine and hint of nutmeg make it savory enough to become a yearly staple for your Thanksgiving gatherings.

10. Cranberry Orange Bran Bread

You can make this as muffins or loaves. This recipe posted at Chef In You is a good guide. However, you can use bran and wheat flour instead of all-purpose flour. Also, you can substitute Stevia for sugar with proper conversion, and you can use butter that is infused with olive oil or use a combination of butter and coconut oil.

Keep track of sugar levels, carbs and fat content in any recipe from turkey glaze to dessert. To help ensure that you stay on track, plan your menu in advance. Figure out serving sizes and total calories. For snack trays, provide lean meats or raw vegetables. This turkey veggie platter is a fun idea for all ages. Most of all, have a safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving.

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Jesse Boskoff

Co-Founder and COO at Status Labs

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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

Assuming the public school system didn’t crush your soul, learning is a great activity. It expands your viewpoint. It gives you new knowledge you can use to improve your life. It is important for your personal growth. Even if you discount the worldly benefits, the act of learning can be a source of enjoyment.

“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” — Mark Twain

But in a busy world, it can often be hard to fit in time to learn anything that isn’t essential. The only things learned are those that need to be. Everything beyond that is considered frivolous. Even those who do appreciate the practice of lifelong learning, can find it difficult to make the effort.

Here are some tips for installing the habit of continuous learning:

1. Always Have a Book

It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or a week to read a book. Always strive to have a book that you are reading through, and take it with you so you can read it when you have time.

Just by shaving off a few minutes in-between activities in my day I can read about a book per week. That’s at least fifty each year.

2. Keep a “To-Learn” List

We all have to-do lists. These are the tasks we need to accomplish. Try to also have a “to-learn” list. On it you can write ideas for new areas of study.

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Maybe you would like to take up a new language, learn a skill or read the collective works of Shakespeare. Whatever motivates you, write it down.

3. Get More Intellectual Friends

Start spending more time with people who think. Not just people who are smart, but people who actually invest much of their time in learning new skills. Their habits will rub off on you.

Even better, they will probably share some of their knowledge with you.

4. Guided Thinking

Albert Einstein once said,

“Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.”

Simply studying the wisdom of others isn’t enough, you have to think through ideas yourself. Spend time journaling, meditating or contemplating over ideas you have learned.

5. Put it Into Practice

Skill based learning is useless if it isn’t applied. Reading a book on C++ isn’t the same thing as writing a program. Studying painting isn’t the same as picking up a brush.

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If your knowledge can be applied, put it into practice.

In this information age, we’re all exposed to a lot of information, it’s important to re-learn how to learn so as to put the knowledge into practice.

6. Teach Others

You learn what you teach. If you have an outlet of communicating ideas to others, you are more likely to solidify that learning.

Start a blog, mentor someone or even discuss ideas with a friend.

7. Clean Your Input

Some forms of learning are easy to digest, but often lack substance.

I make a point of regularly cleaning out my feed reader for blogs I subscribe to. Great blogs can be a powerful source of new ideas. But every few months, I realize I’m collecting posts from blogs that I am simply skimming.

Every few months, purify your input to save time and focus on what counts.

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8. Learn in Groups

Lifelong learning doesn’t mean condemning yourself to a stack of dusty textbooks. Join organizations that teach skills.

Workshops and group learning events can make educating yourself a fun, social experience.

9. Unlearn Assumptions

You can’t add water to a full cup. I always try to maintain a distance away from any idea. Too many convictions simply mean too few paths for new ideas.

Actively seek out information that contradicts your worldview.

Our minds can’t be trusted, but this is what we can do about it to be wiser.

10. Find Jobs that Encourage Learning

Pick a career that encourages continual learning. If you are in a job that doesn’t have much intellectual freedom, consider switching to one that does.

Don’t spend forty hours of your week in a job that doesn’t challenge you.

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11. Start a Project

Set out to do something you don’t know how. Forced learning in this way can be fun and challenging.

If you don’t know anything about computers, try building one. If you consider yourself a horrible artist, try a painting.

12. Follow Your Intuition

Lifelong learning is like wandering through the wilderness. You can’t be sure what to expect and there isn’t always an end goal in mind.

Letting your intuition guide you can make self-education more enjoyable. Most of our lives have been broken down to completely logical decisions, that making choices on a whim has been stamped out.

13. The Morning Fifteen

Productive people always wake up early. Use the first fifteen minutes of your morning as a period for education.

If you find yourself too groggy, you might want to wait a short time. Just don’t put it off later in the day where urgent activities will push it out of the way.

14. Reap the Rewards

Learn information you can use. Understanding the basics of programming allows me to handle projects that other people would require outside help. Meeting a situation that makes use of your educational efforts can be a source of pride.

15. Make Learning a Priority

Few external forces are going to persuade you to learn. The desire has to come from within. Once you decide you want to make lifelong learning a habit, it is up to you to make it a priority in your life.

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Featured photo credit: Paul Schafer via unsplash.com

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