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Charged with a Misdemeanor? You Might Want a Lawyer

Charged with a Misdemeanor? You Might Want a Lawyer

Most people know that if they are charged with a felony, then they need a lawyer. However, it can be harder to determine if an attorney is necessary when faced with a misdemeanor. Often, people believe that misdemeanor offenses aren’t “serious” or think that the repercussions of a conviction are minimal.

In fact, being convicted of a misdemeanor can have real consequences that can follow you the rest of your life. Before you decide that it’s wise to skip hiring a criminal attorney for your misdemeanor case, consider these points.

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It’s Your Right

When facing any criminal charges, you have a right to an attorney based on the United States Constitution. Additionally, you can request a lawyer be present whenever you are being questioned by law enforcement in regards to being accused of a crime. In fact, if you want a lawyer present, and cannot afford one, the state will provide one to you to ensure your rights are protected.

Now, just because you can have a lawyer doesn’t always seem like enough of a reason to work with one. However, it is important to realize that you have other rights, and an attorney can help clarify your options in regards to exercising those rights while ensuring others don’t overstep.

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Misdemeanors Carry Consequences

Any conviction, misdemeanor or felony, has the potential to complicate your life. Depending on the nature of the crime, it can prevent you from obtaining work with certain employers, and may prevent you from pursuing certain careers entirely. It can also limit your access to housing, certain financial products and loans, and family rights.

For example, in a child custody case, a person convicted of a misdemeanor may have trouble obtaining primary custody if the other parent does not have a record. Additionally, misdemeanor convictions may make it difficult, if not impossible, to adopt in some cases.

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Hefty fines are also common with misdemeanor offenses, and some convictions do result in jail time. In fact, if you are unable to make bail, you may find yourself waiting in jail just for the opportunity to be heard, regardless of whether you are guilty or innocent.

The issues associated with a misdemeanor conviction don’t necessarily ease with time. Unless you are able to get the record expunged or sealed, you may face the consequences for the rest of your life. To give a point of comparison, those who file for bankruptcy can expect that information to fall off their credit report in seven to 10 years depending on the exact circumstances. While bankruptcy isn’t a crime, it is one of the few actions a person can take with such lasting consequences, and even they are no longer accessible on a credit report once enough time has passed.

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What to Do                                                            

Before you decide that you don’t need an attorney, consider the potential consequences associated with a conviction. Since you have a legal right to representation, you can often consult with a lawyer to determine exactly what the charges mean and how they can affect the rest of your life. And, since a lawyer will be provided if you can’t afford your own, you don’t have to worry about the financial obligations associated with simply exploring the possibility.

Once you have all of the information regarding how your life can change with a conviction, then you can determine how you want to proceed. It is important to understand that, even with a lawyer, the outcome is never guaranteed. However, you may feel more comfortable fighting against the conviction if you have a skilled attorney on your side. In the end, the decision is yours; just make sure you understand the potential consequences of the decision.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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