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9 Academic Writing And Study Habits Used By Successful Students

9 Academic Writing And Study Habits Used By Successful Students

Many students are discouraged to see that, no matter how hard they try, there is always someone with better grades. You may think this is due to a genetic difference or magical and you cannot do anything against it. Well, you’re wrong!

In fact, it is much more likely that the reason is simply that their study habits are better than yours. Here are 9 helpful academic study habits practised by successful students:

1. Draw a Time Table

This seems like a common habit but the reality is that it is not so much; It is precisely the best students who never fail to plan their future success.

If you feel overwhelmed by the amount of work you have before you, a balanced study schedule will give you the extra motivation you need, helping you focus on one piece of the puzzle each time to progress slowly in its construction.

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2. Take a Break at Intervals

Surprised that one of the recommended study habits is to interrupt your study routine? Many students only practice the study technique that consists of content cramming shortly before the examination.

However, it is scientifically proven that our ability to learn and retain information decreases in direct proportion to the time we spend in front of books. Therefore, if you want to maximise the use of your time, it is advisable that you divide your learning schedule while resting between different sessions:

3. Take Notes

As an advocate of learning, that is, it is important that take done notes when studying. Research has proven that studying and writing goes a long way in helping the brain remember information when needed.

4. Sleep Properly

One of the major enemies of academic excellence among student who do not measure up to others in class is fatigue. The reason sleep is important is that when you rest properly; your brain assimilates what you have learned during the day.

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Therefore, the better you sleep, the more you learn. This habit of study is often overlooked by many students on the excuse that they are very busy. However, successful students recognise the importance of a good rest.

5. Ask Questions

Have you noticed that the most successful students in class always have questions in during a class? Instead of sitting passively listening to what the teacher says, they engage in the learning experience through questions and doubts.

This does not mean that you should always be interrupting the lesson unnecessarily; Questions can also be asked after class, through a study group, etc. Remember: Never stop questioning the why of things; A great question for a small world!

6. Analyse Failures

If you really want to incorporate the best study habits into your routine, you should start right now. Look back, towards your last exams, and review where you had lower grades and why until you understand everything perfectly.

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Regardless of whether we are talking about a final exam, a simple class exercise or an online test, successful students always analyse their failures.

7. Improve Your Vocabulary

Academic writing is very formal and concise in style and uses a formal vocabulary.

According to MHR Writer, “Academic writing should be void of bad grammar, bad style, and poor organisation”. These features can severely obstruct anyone’s academic and professional success. The formal structure that should be used helps to ensure that an academic argument is being supported.

Successful students understand this and as such devote time in improving their vocabulary using helpful means and method. Better students structure their work using proper grammar; sentences and vocabulary give an insight as to why they produce a coherent academic argument.

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8. Simulate Test Conditions

One of the main ways to make sure we get the desired result in our exams is to do tests and simulations that resemble the actual exam.

This means that you must separate from your books, set up a time factor, etc. In this sense, online tests are the ideal resource for preparing test type tests.

9. Apply Knowledge to Real Problems

Successful students know that learning is not about passing tests and getting good grades, but understanding concepts and discovering how you can use them to solve real problems.

Problem-based learning is a method that emphasises precisely this aspect, so it is usually among the most commonly used by the best students.

The best way to become a top student is to try out different techniques and find out which ones best suit you.

Featured photo credit: iacpublishinglabs.com via aos.iacpublishinglabs.com

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Victor Emmanuel

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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

Did you know that 75% of the population suffers from glossophobia? That scary sounding word is one of the most common phobia’s in the world, fear of public speaking.

I’ll bet even as you are reading this, you are getting nervous thinking about giving a speech.

I have got good news for you. In this article, I will share with you a step by step method on how to memorize a speech the smart way. Once you have this method down, your confidence in yourself to deliver a successful speech will increase substantially. Read on to feel well prepared the next time you have to memorize and deliver a speech.

Common Mistakes of Memorizing a Speech

Before we get to the actual process of how to memorize a speech the smart way, let’s look at the two most common mistakes many of us tend to make while preparing for a speech.

Complete Memorization

In an attempt to ensure they remember every detail, many people aim to completely memorize their speech. They practice it over and over until they have every single word burned into their brain.

In many ways, this is understandable because most of us are naturally frightened of having to give a speech. When the time comes, we want to be completely and totally prepared and not make any mistakes.

While this makes a lot of sense, it also comes with its own negative side. The downside to having your speech memorized word for word is that you sound like a robot when delivering the speech. You become so focused on remembering every single part that you lose the ability to inflect your speech to varying degrees, and free form the talk a bit when the situation warrants.

Lack of Preparation

The other side of the coin to complete memorization is people who don’t prepare enough. Because they don’t want to come off sounding like a robot, they decide they will mostly “wing it”.

Sometimes they will write a few main points down on a piece of paper to remind themselves. They figure once they get going, the details will somehow fill themselves in under the big talking points while they are doing the talking.

The problem is that unless this is a topic you know inside and out and have spoken on it many times, you’ll wind up missing key points. It’s almost a given that as soon as you are done with your speech, you’ll remember many things you should have brought up while talking.

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There’s a good balance to be had between over and under preparing. Let’s now look at how to memorize a speech the smart way.

How to Memorize a Speech (Step-by-Step Guide)

1. Write Out Your Speech

The first step in the process is to simply write out your speech.

Many people like to write out the entire speech. Other people are more inclined to write their speech outline style. Whichever way your brain works best is the way you should write your speech.

Personally, I like to break things down into the primary points I want to make, and then back up each major point with several details. Because my mind works this way, I tend to write out speeches, and articles for that matter, by doing an outline.

Once I have the outline completed, I will then fill in several bullet points to back up each big topic.

For instance, if I was going to give a speech on how to get in better shape my outline would look something like this:

Benefits of being in shape

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Exercise

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Diet

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Rest and hydration

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  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

ConclusionNo need for points here, just a few sentences wrapping things up.

As you might imagine, this step typically is the hardest because it’s not only the first step but it also involves the initial creation of the speech.

2. Rehearse Your Speech

Now that you’ve written your speech, or outline, it’s time to start saying it out loud. It’s completely fine to simply read what you’ve written line by line at this point. What you are working on doing is getting the outline and getting a feel for the speech.

If you’ve written the entire speech out, you’ll be editing it while you are rehearsing it. Many times as we say things out loud, we realize that what we wrote needs to be changed and altered. This is how we work towards having a well rounded and smooth speech. Feel free to change things as needed while you are rehearsing your speech.

If you are like me and you’ve written the outline, this is where some of the supporting bullet points will begin to come out. Normally, I will have written several bullet points under each main topic. But as I say it out loud, I will begin to fill in more and more details. I might scratch certain bullet points and add others. I might think of something new at this stage while I am listening to myself and want to add it.

The key to remember here is that you laying the foundation for your awesome speech. At this point, it’s a work in progress, you are getting the key pieces in place.

3. Memorize the Bigger Parts

As you are rehearsing your speech, you want to focus on memorizing the bigger parts, or the main points.

Going back to my example of how to get in better shape, I’d want to ensure I have memorized my primary points. These include the benefits of being in shape, exercise, diet, rest and hydration, and the conclusion. These are the main points I want to make and I will then fill in further details. I’ve got to ensure I know these very well first and foremost.

By practicing your major points, you are building the framework for your speech. After you have this solid outline in place, you’ll continue by adding in the details to round things out.

4. Fill In the Details

Now that you have the big chunks memorized, it’s time to work on memorizing the details. These detail points will provide support and context for your major points. You can work on this all at once or break it down to the details that support each major point.

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For example, the details I might have under the “exercise” big point might include such things as cardio, weights, how many times a week to exercise, how long to actually exercise, and several examples of actual exercises. In this example, I have 5 detail points to memorize to support my major point of “exercise”.

It’s a good idea to test yourself regularly as you are rehearsing your speech. Ask yourself:

What are the 5 detail points I want to talk about that support my 3rd main point?

You need to be able to fire those off quickly. Until you can do this, you won’t be able to associate each of the details with the main point.

You have to be able to have them grouped together in your mind so that it comes out naturally in your speech. So that when you think of main point #2, you automatically think of the 4 supporting details associated with it.

Keep working at this stage until you can run through your speech completely several times and remember all of your big points and the supporting details.

Once you can do that with relative ease, it will be time for the final step, working on your delivery.

5. Work on Your Delivery

You’ve got the bulk of the work done now. You’ve written your speech and rehearsed enough times to have not only your main points memorized but also your supporting details. In short, you should have your speech almost done.

There’s one more step in how to memorize a speech the smart way. The final component is to work on how you deliver your speech.

For the most part, you can go give your speech now. After all, you have it memorized. If you want to ensure you do it right, you’ll want to hone how you are delivering your speech.

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You work on your delivery by rehearsing and running through it a number of times and making tweaks along the way. These tweaks or changes may be are’s where you’d want to pause for effect.

If you’ve found you have used one word 5 times in one paragraph, you might want to swap it out for a similar word a few times to keep it fresh.

Sometimes while working on this part, I’ve thought of a great story that’s happened to me that I can incorporate to make my point even better.

When you work on your delivery, you are basically giving your speech a personality as well.

The Bottom Line

And there you have it, a step by step approach on how to memorize a speech the smart way.

The next time you are asked to give a speech don’t let glossophobia rear its familiar head. Instead, remember this easy to use guide to help craft a powerful speech.

Using the method shown here will help you deliver your next speech with increased confidence.

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Featured photo credit: Anna Sullivan via unsplash.com

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