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4 Compromises to Offer When Clients Ask For a Discount

4 Compromises to Offer When Clients Ask For a Discount

It’s something all salespeople dread. Working hard on an offer, sending it to a potential client, and hearing those five terrible words: “Can I get a discount?” At this point, many salespeople decide to simply accommodate the request to secure the sale. However, this is a mistake; offering a discount on your very first contract with a customer is problematic.

First, it dilutes the value of any future sales, as those buyers know that all they need to do to get a discount is ask. This is a key reason why loyal customers spend 67% more than brand-new customers throughout repeat purchases. It also impacts your customer’s perception of your brand and your product or service.

A high-quality offering is always well worth its original price. Accommodating discount requests also creates additional work for your sales team; if a customer demands a discount each time, they’ll contact their sales rep directly to complete returning purchases instead of placing their order through self-service platforms.

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Given these points, it’s no surprise that discounts do not always have a strong positive impact on businesses. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways you can move the conversation away from discounts by focusing on the real problem or offering something else. Here are four compromises you can suggest in lieu of offering your customers a discount:

1. Revisit the deliverables timeline

When a customer asks for a discount, they’re looking for one of two things: a bit more value than you offered or a way to fit your proposal into the budget. A discount isn’t required to satisfy either of these requirements. In fact, all you need to do is take a look at the delivery timeline.

If your customer is looking for more value, you can consider finding a way to deliver the finished product quicker. If it’s a simple order, expedited shipping could do the trick. If it’s a project or custom order, you could try moving it up a bit.

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On the other hand, if your customer is truly just stressed about the cost of the engagement, ask for their flexibility on the deliverables timeline before you adjust pricing. If they’re willing to wait, you could work on their project when it’s convenient, making it easier for your team to fulfill your end of the contract.

2. Change your proposal’s scope

Not every client has the same needs. If they’re looking for a discount, it could simply mean you’re offering too much for them. Take a look at the scope of your proposal and see if there’s anything on your quote that isn’t a necessity for the client. By removing extraneous options and tightening the scope, you can lower the price and keep the client happy.

3. Offer friendly payment terms

Some customers will ask for a discount simply because they’re going to have trouble paying for everything upfront. For large sales, you can’t let this be an issue. Almost 40% of all invoices in the U.S. are paid late anyway, so you might as well try to find a deposit method that works for both companies. Offer to let them pay in monthly increments over a year or two, or as services are rendered. They’ll have less crunch on their cashflow and you’ll receive fair market price, making everybody happy.

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4. Provide additional, low-margin services

If a customer presses hard for a discount, you need to try and offer them something extra instead. If they’re looking for a $200 discount, for example, try to find something that’s worth $200 you can offer them instead.

This could be a personalized training session, expanded support, or an extended service contract. Doing something like this shows that you’re willing to go above and beyond, and that your company has plenty to offer. Your relationship will be much stronger than if you simply agree to shave $200 off the quote.

Saying ‘no’ to a customer asking for a discount is frightening, but if you have another suggestion lined up, you’ll be able to close the deal more often than not. Make sure to focus on what the customer truly needs and the real problem at hand, and you’ll have no problem training your customers to forget all about discounts.

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Featured photo credit: http://getrefe.tumblr.com/ via 66.media.tumblr.com

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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