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Are You Doing Your Part for Ecotourism?

Are You Doing Your Part for Ecotourism?

The expansion of tourism across the globe is partly responsible for both positive and negative change to the environment on a grand scale. On one hand, we are more educated than ever before on detail of cultures thousands of miles away, how to travel there and immerse ourselves in ways unfamiliar to our daily routines. On the flipside, the demand of more people visiting global destinations year after year comes at a cost. Aircraft pollute the skies, wildlife depletes, and inhabitants lose lands they once claimed as their own.

But it doesn’t have to always be this way. Change can happen and examples must be set to ensure that a conscious effort is being made to protect the destinations we travel to and the surroundings we encounter, not only for our generation but for those in the future.

Cue the term ecotourism, which is a contemporary form of travel that seeks to rebalance the scales and make travel more sustainable – for the benefit of our culture, our environment and our economy. It has been defined by The International Ecotourism Society as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education”.

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How is ecotourism different from other forms of tourism?

There are certain attributes that bring ecotourism into its own, predominantly involving the following:

–       Conscientious, low-impact visitor behaviour

–       Sensitivity towards, and appreciation of, local cultures and biodiversity

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–       Support for local conservation efforts

–       Sustainable benefits to local communities

–       Local participation in decision-making

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In summary, the act of ecotourism allows the places we visit to receive their fair share of the revenue generated from tourism trade.

Why is ecotourism so important?

Travel and leisure companies that facilitate the travel to countries they do not operate out of make profits that are not reinvested in the local community and environment. To put this into perspective, about 80% of travelers’ expenditures go to the airlines, hotels and other international companies and it does not go to local businesses or workers. In places such as Thailand and the Caribbean, the consideration for ecotourism is so low that it is estimated 70-80% of income from tourism goes elsewhere. To champion sustainable tourism would mean that a larger majority of revenue is allocated to the preservation of these regions long term.

What is driving the change for ecotourism?

In this day and age, a holiday offers an experience and those that are unique to their location are the most natural and pure to come by. We all want beaches and landscapes and gems that we can’t find at home but beyond that there is now a global community spirit to ensure we are not leaving such places in a worse state than we find them. For every action there is a reaction; our lasting impact should be that of making the world a better place in any way we can.

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Time waits for no man so getting to see natural worldly wonders in all their glory is a challenge worth taking on. Sustainable living website Litter Bins has created a handy guide for 10 places on earth known for eco tourism to start with, they are:

  1. Costa Rica, which is also en route to becoming the first carbon neutral country by 2021.
  2. Galapagos Islands, which has plants and animals that are not found anywhere else in the world.
  3. Borneo, which is known for rainforest protection and orangutan rehabilitation centres.
  4. Peru, which is home to tropical rainforests and jungles that have always been important ecosystems in our world.
  5. Patagonia, which is home to glacier ranges that are diminishing because of climate change.
  6. Bhutan, which is known as the world’s most eco-friendly and carbon-negative country.
  7. Slovenia, which has a well-deserved reputation for clean, green travel in Europe.
  8. Botswana, a country committed to preserving its natural heritage and wildlife.
  9. New Zealand, which has striking landscapes and expansive untouched wilderness regions.
  10. Vietnam, which is rich in lush green mountains, green rice paddy fields, and national parks.

For further reading on ecotourism and sustainable travel, you may be inspired by the work of international campaigners and green living tips. Stay safe and happy travels.

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Tom Willis

Web Marketing & Content Producer

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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