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How to Keep Calm and Carry On During Stressful Times

How to Keep Calm and Carry On During Stressful Times

We’ve all come across stressful moments in our lives. It affects our productivity and influences our choices. Learning to manage during stressful times is vital for health and lifestyle. Here are some ways to keep calm and carry on when you’re experiencing stress.

Keep a journal

Keeping a journal works as a way to vent without involving another person. Writing out your thoughts is a physical way of letting your emotions out. It’s tangible and writing can help channel out negative feelings.

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Exercise

Leaving the house is difficult when you feel stressed out. I’ve had my fair share of days where I curl up into my bed and waste my day away. This left me feeling stuck and vulnerable. I started slowly by taking walks to my mail box then tried to routinely go for walks. This helps me move around and get out of my house without having to go too far and join a gym. Other forms of exercise also help to reduce stress.

Keep busy

Keeping busy helps you focus on tasks on hand rather than letting your mind wander to “what-if” scenarios. Free time leads to a vicious cycle of feeling sorry for yourself and leaves your mind to constantly think of your problems.

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Assess your problems

In most cases, the majority of our problems are all in our head. Over-thinking leads to imagining problems that are as problematic as they seem. Ask yourself, “is this really an issue?” I’ve had countless moments in life when I thought I was stuck for good. I look back now and realize how silly I was for overreacting to my problems. Take time out to assess your problems before turning them into long-term issues.

Drink water and eat healthily

Stress-eating is one of the worst issues during hard times. I’m guilty of it myself. I can go through leftover cold pizza, ramen noodles, soda, and coffee within the same three-hour period. It’s horrifying and while it feels great at the moment, I feel even worse than I did before once the day has ended. Treat yourself once in awhile but don’t indulge in the dreadful world of binge-eating.

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Listen to music

Music is a gateway to a different world. Listening to music is one of my favorite things to do during stressful times as it takes my mind off of the things bothering me. I either listen to happy music to get me through the day or have a solid cry session listening to sad music. I use Spotify to listen to my music; it recommends other songs and offers mood-based playlists, as well.

Cry it out

Speaking of crying it out, it is a great way to relieve stress. It works as an emotional detox. I tend to let things build up until I suddenly break down and cry a good, ugly cry. I feel better immediately afterward.

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Vent to a friend

Vent to someone if you have a friend you feel comfortable sharing your feelings with. Sometimes, it’s not even advice we need but someone to listen. Venting your emotions is a great way to let out all of the anger, hurt, pain, or depression you’ve been letting simmer inside.

Watch something funny

I love to watch stand-up comedy when I feel sad. It’s my go-to feel-good remedy. Netflix offers a variety of options, including comedians like Kevin Hart, Aziz Ansari, or Louis C.K. If you’re not into stand-up comedy, try watching other shows (I recommend The Office or Parks and Rec) or watch funny dog or cat videos on YouTube. Whatever it is, laugh away your problems until you feel better.

Just breathe

The most important thing to do during stressful periods of life is to breathe. Try breathing exercises. I personally have invested in an air purifier to help me breathe better at home. It clears out the dust and allergens and improves the air circulation in my room. The pink noise also helps me sleep better. When I feel anxious, I can’t take deep breaths properly and this leads to more stress and anxiety, so this solution helps a lot.

Featured photo credit: Carli Jeen via unsplash.com

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Fatima Puri

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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