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10 Ideas to Use When Creating the Perfect Indoor Garden

10 Ideas to Use When Creating the Perfect Indoor Garden

We all aren’t fortunate enough to have a home where we can have beautiful gardens like you see in the magazines. You know the ones where it’s almost like there is an outdoor oasis in the middle of nowhere. Since there are so many people who are lacking a beautiful oasis, more and more are turning to indoor gardens to bring some greenery inside.

As you read this article, we hope to provide you with some ideas on how to create the perfect indoor garden for your space, and also give you some tips on how to make your garden flourish. Let’s get started, shall we?

1. Concrete Wall Planters

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    You can find concrete wall planters at your local garden shop, or you can make your own. If you want to make your own planter, pour concrete into a molds (these molds can be made out of anything). Make sure there are holes or tabs in the mold so that the concrete planter will have enough drainage. When the concrete dries, paint it to match your color scheme.

    2. Rolling Cart Plant Holder

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      If you have a bar cart that you aren’t using anymore, you can re-purpose it into a rolling succulent rack. Add a little bit of mesh to drain excess water and then full the compartments with soil. Finally add moss to the surface and then plant as many succulents and flowers that you want.

      3. Mason Jar Plant Holder

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        Mason jars are great containers for growing fresh herbs. If you don’t have much space on the floor or the counter for pots, you can create a hanging wall planter like the one pictured fairly easily and inexpensively. Simply use a piece of wood (we like reclaimed wood that has loads of character), mason jars, some hooks, and chain. Of course, this is just one option. There are many unique variations on this idea on Pinterest.

        4. Gold Leaf Mason Jars

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          Here’s another idea for mason jars! If you want something a bit fancier, but still like the look of the mason jar, update it by using the special adhesive for gold leaf and paint it onto the outside of the jar where you want the gold. After you have the gold leaf where you want it, remove the backing paper and cover it with a thin coating of Mod Podge that will dry clear. Then once that is all finished, you can plant your herbs inside or use it as a shabby chic vase for the table.

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          5. Indoor Wooly Pocket

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            Who needs artwork when you can have a living and breathing (sort of) piece of art hanging on your wall? These wooly pockets are perfect for homes with kids and pets and lessen the chances of either knocking the plants over and making a huge mess. You can find these wooly pockets online and at stores all over the country. Then you can talk to your local nursery for plants that are easy to care for and have beautiful foliage.

            6. Leather Planters

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              Leather doesn’t have to be for clothing or furniture—it can be used to turn any regular pot into a hanging planter. Grab a scrap piece of leather and make some strategic cuts into it (this will be where the pot will sit). Use some rope to string it up and hang them in your window. These little pots are perfect for small varieties of plants and succulents.

              7. Pop Top Planters

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                If you just want something simple to start your little herb garden with, why not use last night’s vegetable can? All you have to do is use a can and can opener. Remove the label (or not, the choice is yours), and clean it. Add some soil and seeds, and then stick it in the sunlight. It’ll be a matter of time before your can is brimming with herbs.

                8. Tiered Plant Stand

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                  These little plant stands are great if you have potted flowers that need to come inside for the winter. You can find them in made out of wood, metal, or a combination of the two. The awesome thing about these stands is that you can move it around pretty easily and it doesn’t take up too much space. If you are handy and have a creative mind, you can make your plant stand.

                  9. Mini Clay Pot Magnets

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                    Every home looks better with a little bit of greenery. When you’re trying to brighten up your space, why not add some plant life to magnetic surfaces like refrigerators or doors? You can make these fun accessories by taking a tiny terra cotta pot and gluing a magnet to the back. Finish the pot by tucking a tiny succulent or even an air plant inside. It adds that perfect touch of whimsy, don’t you think?

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                    10. Faux Stone Planters

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                      Stone planters aren’t all that special when it comes to gardening, but these small planters can’t be passed up. All you will have to do is glue flat stones together in a bowl shape, fill it with moss and succulents and viola; you’ve got a unique planter for your shelf, desk, mantle, wherever!

                      Now that you have a few ideas of what you could do for your indoor garden, here’s a few things you need to remember when caring for your little plant babies.

                      • Make sure your plants are receiving just enough sunlight. Some plants require more light than others, so it’s a good idea to read up on how much light your plants need.
                      • Remember not to overwater your plants. Most plants are going to need to be in a pot with good drainage so that the excess water doesn’t rot the roots.
                      • Keep your plants clean. Oh yeah! You do have dust the leaves of your plants. Like anything else in your home, they’ll get dusty.
                      • Groom your plants to encourage growth. If there’re any leaves or flowers that are showing signs of dying, you should clip them so that new growth start,

                      Now, go forth and start that indoor garden that you’ve been dreaming about!

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                      Published on June 30, 2020

                      What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

                      What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

                      Many conversations are being held nowadays regarding unconscious bias, but what does it really mean and how can it affect your life and the people around you? With many types of biases, it can get quite confusing. In this article, we’ll touch on cognitive bias, and then zero in on unconscious bias. Both types of biases have an immediate impact on your life because they relate to how you and others think about yourself and other people.

                      If you want to protect your relationships and make good decisions about other people, you need to know what these biases mean[1]. Once we have clarity about that, we can explore in more depth unconscious bias and how to address it[2].

                      Cognitive Bias

                      Let’s start with cognitive bias[3], a predictable pattern of mental errors that result in us misperceiving reality and, as a result, deviating away from the most likely way of reaching our goals[4].

                      These mental blind spots impact all areas of our life, from health to relationships and even shopping, as a study recently revealed[5]. In other words, from the perspective of what is best for us as individuals, falling for a cognitive bias always harms us by lowering our probability of getting what we want.

                      Cognitive biases have to do with judgment, not mood. Ironically, cognitive biases — such as the optimism bias and overconfidence effect — more often lead to positive moods. Of course, the consequence of falling into cognitive biases, once discovered, usually leaves us in a bad mood due to the disastrous results of these dangerous judgment errors.

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                      Unconscious Bias

                      Unconscious bias is different from cognitive bias. Also known as implicit bias, it refers to unconscious forms of discrimination and stereotyping based on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, ability, age, and so on[6]. Despite cognitive biases sometimes leading to discriminatory thinking and feeling patterns, these are two separate and distinct concepts.

                      Cognitive biases are common across humankind and relate to the particular wiring of our brains, while unconscious bias relates to perceptions between different groups and are specific for the society in which we live. For example, I bet you don’t care or even think about whether someone is a noble or a commoner, yet that distinction was fundamentally important a few centuries ago across Europe. To take another example, most people in the US don’t have strong feelings about Sunni vs. Shiite Muslims, yet this distinction is incredibly meaningful in many parts of the world.

                      Unconscious Bias and Discriminatory Behavior

                      Organizations often bring me in as a speaker on diversity and inclusion to address potential unconscious discriminatory behavior. When I share in speeches that black Americans suffer from police harassment and violence at a much higher rate than white people, some participants (usually white) occasionally try to defend the police by claiming that black people are more violent and likely to break the law than whites. They thus attribute police harassment to the internal characteristics of black people (implying that it is deserved), and not to the external context of police behavior.

                      In reality – as I point out in my response to these folks – research shows that black people are harassed and harmed by police at a much higher rate for the same kind of activity. A white person walking by a cop, for example, is statistically much less likely to be stopped and frisked than a black one[7].

                      At the other end of things, a white person resisting arrest is much less likely to be violently beaten than a black one. In other words, statistics show that the higher rate of harassment and violence against black Americans by police is due to the prejudice of the police officers, at least to a large extent[8].

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                      However, I am careful to clarify that this discrimination is not necessarily intentional. Sometimes, it indeed is deliberate, with white police officers consciously believing that black Americans deserve much more scrutiny than whites. At other times, the discriminatory behavior results from unconscious, implicit thought processes that the police officer would not consciously endorse[9].

                      After becoming aware that unconscious bias does exist, the next step would be learning how to recognize it in order to reduce it. I’ve outlined three crucial points to keep in mind below while further exploring the unconscious prejudice discussed above.

                      How to Reduce Unconscious Bias

                      Remember these three important points if you want to work on reducing your unconscious bias.

                      1. Unconscious Bias is a Systemic Issue

                      When we understand that unconscious bias is ultimately a systemic issue, we understand that internal cultures need to be checked and addressed first.

                      Interestingly, research shows that many black police officers have an unconscious prejudice against other black people, perceiving them in a more negative light than white people when evaluating potential suspects. This unconscious bias carried by many — not all — black police officers helps show that such prejudices come – at least to a significant extent – from internal cultures within police departments, rather than pre-existing racist attitudes present before someone joins a police department.

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                      Such cultures are perpetuated by internal norms, policies, and training procedures, and any police department wishing to address unconscious bias needs to address internal culture first and foremost, rather than attributing racism to individual officers.

                      In other words, instead of saying it’s a few bad apples in a barrel of overall good ones, the key is recognizing that unconscious bias is a systemic issue, and the structure and joints of the barrel needs to be fixed[10].

                      2. There Is No Shame in Unconscious Bias

                      Another crucial thing that needs to be highlighted is that there is no shame or blame in unconscious bias as it’s not stemming from any fault in the individual. This no-shame approach decreases the fight, freeze, or flight defensive response among reluctant audiences, helping them hear and accept the issue.

                      Unconscious bias is prevalent and often doesn’t match our conscious values. Everyone holds unconscious beliefs and prejudices stemming from our tendency to categorize people into social groups. This developed naturally as a way for our ancestors to quickly size up a possible threat. Unfortunately, it doesn’t translate well in modern life.

                      3. It Takes a Sustained Effort to Prevent and Protect Against Unconscious Bias

                      After being presented with additional statistics and discussion of unconscious bias, the issue is generally settled. Still, from their subsequent behavior it’s clear that some of these audience members don’t immediately internalize this evidence. It’s much more comforting for their gut reactions to believe that police officers are right and anyone targeted by police deserves it; in turn, they are highly reluctant to accept the need to focus more efforts and energy on protecting black Americans from police violence due to the structural challenges facing these groups.

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                      The issue of unconscious bias doesn’t match their intuitions, so they reject this concept, despite extensive and strong evidence for its pervasive role in policing. It takes a series of subsequent follow-up conversations and interventions to move the needle. A single training is almost never sufficient, both in my experience and according to research[11].

                      Conclusion

                      The examples and points raised illustrate broader patterns you need to follow to recognize unconscious bias. Only by doing so will you be able to determine if, and what type of, intervention is needed to address it.

                      Unfortunately, our gut reactions lead us to make poor judgment choices when we simply follow our intuitions. Unconscious biases are systemic and need to be addressed in order to make the best decisions[12].

                      We need to learn about the kind of problems that result from unconscious bias. Then, you need to develop the right mental habits to help you make the best choices[13]. A one-time training is insufficient for doing so. It takes a long-term commitment and constant discipline and efforts to overcome unconscious bias, so get started now.

                      More Tips on Overcoming Unconscious Bias

                      Featured photo credit: M.T ElGassier via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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