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What is a Criminal Attorney and Why You May Need One

What is a Criminal Attorney and Why You May Need One

The law is a diverse field with multiple specialties based on specific kinds of cases. And a criminal attorney is just one of the options available. But what exactly does a criminal lawyer do? The answer is both simple and complex, depending on your perspective.

The Basics

A criminal attorney also referred to as a criminal defense lawyer or public defender, is a lawyer that focuses on the defense of individuals and organizations that have been charged with a particular crime. Criminal attorneys focus on understanding the law regarding specific kinds of criminal charges and work to assert the defendant’s innocence or ensure that only appropriate charges are brought forward. They can also work with the prosecution to reach a deal, referred to as a plea bargain, should the defendant wish to plead guilty and/or avoid a court case.

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Like other legal specialties, criminal lawyers must obtain a law degree and successfully pass the Bar exam in the state where they intend to practice. Additionally, board certifications are available but are not required. Once they accept a case, they research the available information, interview witnesses, research case law and applicable statutes, laws, and regulations, and then create a defense strategy. They also speak on behalf of the defendant during the trial, serving as their advocate. Criminal attorneys can also draft and file appeals.

The Working Environment

Criminal lawyers may work in a variety of environments. Most commonly, they work as part of a private practice or operate a solo firm. In some cases, defense attorneys work for non-profit organizations and even government agencies. Aside from maintaining office hours, they also meet defendants at courthouses, hospitals, and even prisons to help solidify their case.

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It isn’t uncommon for criminal lawyers to begin their careers on the other side, working for the prosecutor’s office. Some start out on the defense side, but work for non-profits or provide services as a public defender. However, it is not required to begin your career in such a fashion, but it can help you build the skills and reputation necessary to successfully transition into criminal defense.

Criminal Law Specialties

While criminal law is a specialty in its own right, there are subspecialties within the field. Some attorneys focus on defending specific kinds of criminal charges, such as domestic violence, sex crimes, violent crimes, drug offenses, thefts, and fraud. Others practice more generally, though may functionally end up specializing if their reputation in a particular area grows strong.

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Clients

Criminal attorneys may defend people who were wrongly accused as well as those who may be guilty. The opposite can happen when serving as a prosecutor. Regardless of the defendant’s guilt or innocence, it is important that a criminal lawyer always does their best work for their client. The right to a competent attorney is a critical part of the overall legal process, and this requires that each attorney takes their responsibilities seriously.

Additionally, the attorney and client are able to operate with “attorney-client privilege.” This allows the client to speak freely with their attorney without the attorney being required to disclose any of the information regardless of how it pertains to the client’s guilt or innocence.

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However, it is also the attorney’s job to advise their clients on the best course of action. If a client is guilty, it may be wise to arrange a plea bargain instead of going to trial and risking a guilty verdict. Even if that is the case, it is ultimately the criminal lawyer’s job to adhere to the wishes of their clients. That means, should the client insist on entering a not guilty plea and moving forward with a trial, then the attorney must act accordingly.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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