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Mac Buggy after Mac OS Sierra Update? 4 Fixes Here!

Mac Buggy after Mac OS Sierra Update? 4 Fixes Here!

The much awaited Mac OS Sierra update was officially made available on the 20th of September, 2016. The brand new Mac OS boast of an advanced and more helpful Siri, optimized storage management options, full compatibility with the Apple watch and highly improved Messaging features.

But then, what good is all that if your Mac started to act buggy right after the update to Mac OS Sierra. If you are one among those small groups of unfortunate users who are having troubles with Mac OS Sierra, here are fixes that will help restore your Mac back to normal!

First, please backup your Mac!

It is highly recommended that you first back up your Mac before you carry out any of the fixes below. Please note that the fixes below have been tested and tried by many who vouch for its safety. Nonetheless, it doesn’t hurt to take the extra precaution that will allow you to simply roll back to a restore point on your Mac, created through Time Machine. Here’s a comprehensive guide on how to carry out Time Machine backups on Mac OS Sierra.

Fixing Wi-Fi issues in Mac OS Sierra

1. Deleting and force re-writing system files to fix Wi-Fi problems

A Mac without Wi-Fi is no fun. In fact, it could even almost be useless. If your Wi-Fi was working fine until before the update to Mac OS Sierra, apply the following fixes to revive your wireless connection.

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  1. First, please quit all apps that are using or trying to use the internet connection (e.g. Chrome, Safari, iTunes, etc.)
  2. Turn off the problematic Wi-Fi connection
  3. Go to Finder
  4. Enter “/Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/”
  5. Locate the following 5 files
    1. com.apple.airport.preferences.plist
    2. com.apple.network.eapolclient.configuration.plist
    3. com.apple.wifi.message-tracer.plist
    4. NetworkInterfaces.plist
    5. preferences.plist
  6. Copy these files onto a flash drive (Precautionary step)
  7. Delete the files on your Mac OS Sierra partition, once you have a copy of them
  8. Restart your Mac
  9. Also, restart your Wi-Fi router when you restart your Mac
  10. See if your Mac OS Sierra Wi-Fi connection is back to normal!

Don’t worry about deleting the files mentioned above. Mac OS Sierra is designed to rewrite these files after a successful restart. There is a very high chance that your Wi-Fi problems will go away after you apply this simple fix.

If it still persists, try the slightly more complicated fix detailed below.

2. Fixing Mac OS Sierra problems by entering custom DNS

  1. First, please quit all apps that are using or trying to use the internet connection (e.g. Chrome, Safari, iTunes etc)
  2. Open System Preferences
  3. Go to your Wi-Fi connection and select the “Edit Locations” option
  4. Create a new Wi-Fi connection, giving it any name you choose
  5. Join this new Wi-Fi connection that you have created, by entering your Wi-Fi password if prompted
  6. After you have connected, go to advanced settings of this Wi-Fi connection
    1. Edit TCP/IP > Renew DHCP lease > Apply > DNS >
      1. Enter 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 (DNS of Google)
  7. Click OK
  8. Go to Hardware > Configure > Custom > Edit MTU number to 1453
  9. Click OK and Save

Once all the above edits are saved, your Wi-Fi connection should hopefully be working well. If not, restart your Mac and your Wi-Fi router just to be safe and see if your Wi-Fi works normally.

The above two fixes should give you about a 95% chance of restoring your Mac OS Sierra related Wi-Fi problems, especially if your Wi-Fi started acting up just after the update to Mac OS Sierra.

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Performance issues after upgrade to Mac OS Sierra

After Wi-Fi issues, the second most common gripe for users who just updated to Mac OS Sierra is their Mac has become sluggish. Multi-tasking takes too long or the Mac just wakes up from sleep too slowly, etc.

There are fixes for speed issues as well. Some of the easy ones are detailed out below. For a comprehensive list of fixes, please visit this Mac OS Sierra performance troubleshooting guide.

1. Carry out an SMC Reset

An SMC reset is a soft hardware reset that will fix potential issues with thermal monitoring, the response of the power button, spin cycles of your hard drives, etc. Resetting this to factory defaults can potentially spring Mac OS Sierra back to life.

Don’t worry about deleting important user data when carrying out these resets. They are safe resets that might in the worst case scenario only require that you change your system time and so on.

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To carry out an SMC reset,

  1. Shut down your Mac
  2. Unplug your Mac from the wall charger or outlet
  3. Press and hold the power button, for 15 seconds (use a timer!)
  4. Release the power button
  5. Reconnect Mac to the wall charger
  6. Wait for about 10 seconds
  7. Turn on your Mac like normal

Though very simple, this can be a miracle fix sometimes!

2. Carry out a PRAM reset

Quite similar to an SMC reset, you can also carry out a PRAM reset. Again, resetting PRAM will not result in any loss of personal user data or important system data.

  1. Power off your Mac
  2. Power on your Mac
  3. As soon as your Mac starts up, press the combination of the following keys; Option + Command + R + P (all together)
  4. Press and hold until your Mac restarts
  5. Once your Mac restarts the second time, release all keys and allow for a normal restart

Besides these fixes, it is also very important that you make sure your Mac is first compatible with Mac OS Sierra. As Mac OS Sierra is the latest OS out from Apple, it is more demanding on your Mac’s processor and memory than its predecessors like El Capitan, Yosemite or Mavericks.

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Unless you bought your Mac in late 2009 or after, it probably isn’t good enough to run Mac OS Sierra. If this is the case, you have only the option of rolling back to your older version of Mac OS X, like OS X Mavericks, OS Yosemite or OS X El Capitan. Here’s a good resource on how to rollback from Mac OS Sierra to one of the older OS X versions.

Featured photo credit: digitaltrends.com via icdn3.digitaltrends.com

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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