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Best And Worst Foods For Menstrual Cramps That Most Of Us Don’t Know

Best And Worst Foods For Menstrual Cramps That Most Of Us Don’t Know

Only women know how painful having a menstrual period can be. When men are told by women that they are feeling like “hell” while they have their periods, the men sometimes do not believe the women. Several factors contribute to this “hellish” feeling, including moodiness, irritability, bloating, and menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea. Luckily, there are ways to feel less menstrual cramp pain depending on what you eat. Let’s take a look at what we can do about it.

What food should you avoid?

Since the pain is caused by inflammation (and anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen are often used), you should keep away from inflammatory foods. Examples of inflammatory foods are refined carbohydrates such as white bread and pastries, french fries and other fried foods, soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages, red meat like in burgers or steaks, and processed meat such as hot dogs and sausages, margarine, shortening, and lard.

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    Also, the following ingredients should be avoided in the food that you eat because they can cause inflammation.

    These ingredients include

    • sugar
    • saturated fats
    • trans fats
    • omega 6 fatty acids
    • refined carbohydrates
    • MSG (in tomatoes, cheese)
    • gluten
    • casein (in milk)
    • artificial sweeteners
    • alcohol

    What food should you eat?

    Both vitamin D and omega 3 fatty acids help decrease the levels of prostaglandins in the system. Both can be found in

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    • flaxseed oil
    • fish oil
    • chia seeds
    • walnuts
    • fish roe (eggs)
    • fatty fish (such as tuna, mackerel, and salmon)
    • seafood
    • soybeans
    • spinach and leafy vegetables
    • food fortifed with vitamin D (such as dairy products, orange juice, soy milk, and cereals)
    • beef liver
    • cheese
    • egg yolks

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      Also, you should eat foods that fight inflammation such as olive oil, green leafy vegetables (such as spinach, kale, and collards), nuts (such as almonds and walnuts), fatty fish (such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines), and fruits (such as strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and oranges).

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        Another tip is to have more vitamins and minerals such as those on the list below:

        Calcium

        Calcium may also help reduce menstrual pain because it helps maintain muscle tone. However, the evidence isn’t clear.

        Vitamin D

        Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation (as stated above). Vitamin D may interact with a number of medications, so ask your doctor before taking more than the recommended daily allowance.

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        Vitamin E

        Vitamin E (can be found in almonds, spinach, etc.) may help reduce menstrual pain. In one study, women who took vitamin E had less menstrual cramps than those who took placebo. Vitamin E may increase the risk of bleeding, especially those who take blood thinners. People with heart disease, diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, or cancer of the head, neck, or prostate, should avoid high doses of vitamin E without first asking their doctor.

        Magnesium

        Magnesium has been found out from studies to help reduce menstrual pain. However, too much magnesium can cause diarrhea and lower blood pressure. If you have digestive problems or a heart disease, or if you are taking other medications, ask your doctor before taking magnesium because this interacts with other medications.

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        Sarah Bonander

        Writer, Human Resources Professional

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        Last Updated on May 15, 2019

        How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

        How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

        As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

        “Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

        When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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        Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

        We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

        But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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        So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

        It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

        1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

        Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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        2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

        This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

        You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

        3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

        This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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        4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

        How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

        So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

        If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

        And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

        Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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