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Have Skin Problems? Try Running! It’ll Save You

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Have Skin Problems? Try Running! It’ll Save You

When people think about the benefits of running, things like a more efficient cardiovascular system, increased lung capacity and stronger muscles and bones are often what comes to mind – not to mention a lean, muscled figure. And runners who exercise regularly do often enjoy these kinds of health benefits.

However, it’s not just your heart or lungs or muscles that benefit from regular running. As an added bonus, women especially will be delighted to know that running can also help improve their skin.

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The Skin Will Detoxify Itself More Efficiently

If you run frequently, you probably have noticed a “post-workout glow” to your skin when you get home. There are biological reasons for this. One of the reasons that running benefits in the skin is through increasing and improving circulation. This increased circulation means that more nutrients are delivered to the skin cells as well as higher levels of oxygen. It also means that the skin is able to detoxify itself more efficiently. Better circulation can also increase the rate at which skin cells reproduce and can also help to clear the blockage of pores, which in the long run can also help with conditions like acne.

It’ll Push Out Dirt, Oil And Other Debris Out Of The Pores

Okay, most women don’t like having to sweat even when they’re working out – but the good news is that this sweat is actually great for skin as well. Sweat is able to de-clog pores, pushing out dirt, oil and other debris out of the pores so that the skin is clear and cleansed. Also, when women work out, they tend to drink more water and this hydration is also great for skin health.

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Hormones And Stress Would Be Regulated

Hormones can also be a culprit when it comes to keeping the skin clear and women dealing with the monthly fluctuations of progesterone and estrogen can feel frustrated at breakouts of acne that correlate with the menstruation. Regular exercise, such as running, however, can help to regulate hormones and prevent them from causing skin eruptions. Closely linked to hormonal regulation is the regulation of stress, which can have a negative impact on skin health as well. Many skin conditions are made worse when anxiety and stress levels are not adequately controlled; exercise, however, can release endorphins which provide natural stress relief.

A Few Exceptions to the Rule

There are a few exceptions to the rule of running and skin benefits, however. For those with chronic skin problems such as eczema or psoriasis, the sweat that exercise produces can dry out irritated areas of skin and can cause stinging or discomfort. People with these conditions should talk to their doctor about how to protect their skin during exercise as well as which exercises are most appropriate for a given condition.

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Two Great Running Apps To Try

For people who are wanting to take advantage of all the health benefits of running — including benefits to the skin — running apps are a great way to go. And the good news is that there are a wide variety of apps to choose from, including:

  • RunKeeper. This iOS- or Android-compatible app is attractive because it contains plans designed by top coaches and also allows you to download your information onto social media sites so that you can track against your running buddies.
  • MapMyRun. For runners who have regular routes or want to create new ones, this mapping app is a great tool as it allows you to follow a “breadcrumb” trail onscreen and is perfect for running in a new city or other unfamiliar territory. This app is iOS- or Android-compatible.

In short, running is not just great for your overall health but can give you the gift of beautiful, glowing skin as well. And the apps listed above can help you with your running goals whether you are just beginning or are an experienced and seasoned runner.

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Brian Wu

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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