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7 Insanely Fun Ways to Learn a Language When You’re Too Busy

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7 Insanely Fun Ways to Learn a Language When You’re Too Busy

Who says you can’t have fun while learning a language?

With the advent of technology, communication tools, and access to information, there’s no reason why anyone should be confined to the traditional ways of learning, like a classroom.

Not only are there more effective solutions out there, but there are creative ways that will spur excitement into your learning process, which will inevitably help you learn faster through engagement.

We’ve hand-curated 7 for you to explore. We highly encourage that you try at least one of these today!

1. Learn 10 New Words Every Morning

We get it. You’re busy, and live life on-the-go. But anyone can learn 10 new words every day, whether it’s on your commute to work or during your lunch breaks.

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Research shows that when you learn 1,000 of the most common words in any language, you’re able to familiarize yourself with over 85% of the oral language! That means that by learning 10 new words a day, you can reach 85% fluency in a language in just 100 days.

Sure, you’ll still need to practice and master how to speak the language properly, but you’ll be well ahead of the pack.

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    2. Attend a Language Exchange

    Love meeting new people? Why not attend a language exchange meetup in your local city?

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      You’ll have the opportunity to meet like-minded people that share your passion for travel, culture, and languages, and be able to practice your speaking skills as well!

      Use websites like Eventbrite, Meetup, or Couchsurfing to find local language meetups in your city.

      3. Play Games Online

      That’s right. You can play games online and learn a language.

      The trick as you may have guessed is to seek out communities that speak your target language, whether it’s Spanish, French, Mandarin, etc.

      The second option is to use the Language Option on whichever game you’re playing, and switch it to the target language you’re trying to learn.

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        4. Date Someone That Speaks Your Target Language

        Spice up your dating life by seeking out someone that speaks your target language. With the rise of online dating, there are more ways than ever to filter through people from different cultures, and find the one you’re looking for.

        The good news is, you’ll immediately have something in common with when you meet them! Good luck :)

        5. Find a Private Teacher to Learn Wherever You Are

        Too busy to learn a language and just want to work with the best teachers to accelerate your language skills? The best way to learn a language for you then is to find a private teacher online. It will allow you to learn wherever you live in the world, nearly any time of the day, and any day of the week. This ultimate flexibility and on-demand scheduling is what will motivate you to continue learning in the long-run versus a fixed location and time schedule that’s required at a language class. Besides, who has the time to drive back and forth to a class every day!

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        6. Netflix and “Chill”

        Love to Netflix and ‘Chill’? Why not Netflix, ‘Chill’, and learn a language?

        Whether you’re on Netflix, Hulu, HBO, or any other streaming platform, you have the option to listen to your favorite movies and TV shows in a different language. If the audio version in your target language is not available, then experiment with subtitles first. Not sure what movie to watch? Check out this complete list of movies to watch on Netflix.

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          7. Switch your Social Media Into Your Target Language

          Another creative & fun way to learn a language is to start sharing your social media updates in your target language. It’s not too much additional effort since you’re already sharing on social media anyways, so why not develop your foreign language writing skills along the way? Take an example from Brazilian supermodel Gisele herself.

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            More by this author

            Sean Kim

            Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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