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Designing the Superior Man: 15 Powerful Qualities (Part 2)

Designing the Superior Man: 15 Powerful Qualities (Part 2)

This is Part Two (of Three) describing 15 qualities of superior men. Each part will discuss 5 key qualities to embrace in order to design the superior man.

Read Part One here (Part 1).

To become an elite and powerful man, you must disregard trying to be in the top 1%. Instead, strive to join the 0.000001%.

We have been taught that it is a sin to achieve wealth. When we think about a man with a large amount of money, we think he must surely be evil. We have been brainwashed to believe that the highest virtue is to live for other people and to give, to relieve other people’s suffering. It is noble to assist others; however, we must be able to have something to give.

“Men have been taught that the highest virtue is not to achieve, but to give. Yet one cannot give that which has not been created.” – Ayn Rand.

The best way to give and help others is to teach them to use their own mind. The superior man knows that he cannot think for another and that man must learn to think for himself. This is the only way to give and assist others in relieving suffering. What are we teaching another person by doing their work for them? What lessons can be taught by providing handouts without effort to earn or produce something?

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Continuing from Part One, we will use more examples from The Fountainhead and similar books with the goal of identifying key traits of superior men. Here is Part Two of the qualities of the ideal man.

1. Activate Your Mind

“To know and not to do, is not yet to know.” – Roger Hamilton

Superior men choose to activate their mind. Ayn Rand provides us a brilliant example of a simple choice we all have in life – “To think or not.” What a simple choice, yet it seems that everyone makes it so difficult. The ideal man chooses to activate his mind; he chooses to choose. The alternative is to wish for something. These men do not activate their mind, but only wish something to happen without taking the steps to achieve it.

Men who use and activate their mind move the world forward. In The Fountainhead, Howard Roark explains the following, “Man cannot survive except through his mind. His brain is his only weapon. Through the process of thought, from the simplest necessity to the highest religious abstraction, from the wheel to the skyscraper, everything we are and everything we have comes from a single attribute of man – the function of his reasoning mind.”

2. Ask Better Questions

“Minds are of three kinds: one is capable of thinking for itself; another is able to understand the thinking of others; and a third can neither think for itself nor understand the thinking of others. The first is of the highest excellence, the second is excellent, and the third is worthless.” – Niccolo Machiavelli

High performing men have found a secret in life. They found clarity in visioning a life where they are producing and living on a higher level (more on this in Part Three). In Roger Hamilton’s inspirational book Wink and Grow Rich, we are provided with phenomenal, yet simple advice. The main character is a little boy by the name of Richard. He receives the following wisdom, “Choose the level you want to play at. What you see is always what you get. Learn to see better and you will get better.” In order to see better, Richard must learn to live at a different level of clarity. In order to live on this new level, he needs to ask better questions.

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Superior men have figured this one out. If we are able to ask better questions, we can literally get anything we want. The key to asking a better question is to listen to people with full attention. By doing this, you will discover who the person is and what they are looking for. You can discover an unlimited amount of information about a person just by simply paying full attention. Another trick is to use the “5 Why” technique. Use this technique to get to the root cause of any issue. Simply keep asking “why” and ask it a minimum of 5 times. Such a simple technique, yet, for some reason we stop using it when we turn ten years of age.

Try this the next time you are in a job interview or seeking a promotion, where you are asked this type of typical, yet pointless question, “Tell me about a challenge or conflict you’ve faced at work and how you dealt with it.” Respond with, “You don’t want to ask me that question. The question you want to ask me is – How will you make this company more money? That is the real question you want to ask, and here is how I will make you more money…” – Dr. Jamie Schwandt

3. Money is Not Evil

“If you’re born poor, it’s not your mistake. But if you die poor, it’s your mistake.” – Bill Gates

I grew up extremely poor. I was always told that money is evil and people with money are evil. Guess who told me this – poor people! Money is not evil, evil people with money are evil. The key here is the use of the word “evil” because evil people are also poor.

My childhood was spent bouncing around between my biological parents, grandparents, and foster parents. I grew up in a world of drugs, alcohol, suicide, depression, and handouts. My father committed suicide when I was eighteen years old. He attempted suicide before I was born and his mother committed suicide. His first suicide attempt was during his time in the U.S. Navy. Afterwards, he was placed on full disability and received welfare checks for the remainder of his life. My mother, who attempted suicide on multiple occasions, also received handouts, and I am sure she still does.

My younger brother now lives in a world of handouts. His only interaction with me is when he is in need of money. However, I will never provide him money, only advice. He will never learn to think for himself by way of handouts. Additionally, he is addicted to drugs, so if he asks for $20… where do you think my money will go?

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Superior men achieve wealth because they do not care to ask someone’s permission for it. They do not care what you think of their integrity or moral compass. They understand that time is limited, once wasted, it is gone forever. We have a limited amount of time on this planet and we all need resources to succeed. Remember this – money is infinite, time is finite.

“There is no shortage of money, only a shortage of people thinking big enough.” – Grant Cardone

4. Obsessed

“Be the type of person that when your feet touch the floor in the morning, the devil says, Aww Sh*t… they’re up.” – Dwayne Johnson

Superior men are crazy, different, and 100% completely obsessed with success. These men understand that what they obsess about will get better. If you obsess about creating wealth, you will create wealth. If you obsess about writing a book, you will write a book. However, if you obsess about pleasing everyone, you will make yourself go crazy trying to create a better life for other people while your life is falling apart.

Superior men are obsessed with success. They do not mull over ideas for hours without action. They do not just think, they do. If they think about writing a book, they write the book. If they think about starting a business, they start the business. They just do it.

“Commit first, figure the rest out later.” – Grant Cardone

5. Be a Creator

“When Paris Hilton can top the bestsellers’ list, we are one more Connect Four move closer to Armageddon.” – Corey Taylor

Listen, if Paris Hilton can create her own success, then you can too. We are all capable of creating a life of success. The key is to be crazy and different. Do you know what a genius is called before they are called a genius? Crazy!

The world of quantum physics is crazy and mind-bending. Quantum physics has demonstrated that we have little understanding of the world we live in. However, it has also provided us a playground for our mind. The Double Slit Experiment (I encourage you to look it up) demonstrates that electrons exist in a state of pure potential when they are not being observed. The act of simply observing is the act of creating.

We can create our own world, our own reality through our thoughts and actions. Superior men have figured this out… so has Paris Hilton! Remember this quote:

“Your theory is crazy, but it’s not crazy enough to be true.” – Niels Bohr.

Featured photo credit: elonmusk.com via cnbc.com

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Dr. Jamie Schwandt

Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

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Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

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