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5 Ways To Skyrocket Your Social Media Presence Like A Celebrity

5 Ways To Skyrocket Your Social Media Presence Like A Celebrity

In this day and age, your social media presence is the biggest indicator of your social influence and audience. People with hundreds of thousands of followers receive unique marketing opportunities and engagements, and a tech-savvy person can easily figure out how to profit financially off of an active social media presence.

But boosting your internet presence is no easy task. It can often feel futile, like shouting into a void, to try to grow your audience. However, research and experience have led to multiple tips on improving your chances. Here are five ways to skyrocket your own social media presence.

1. Find your individual edge

To reel in followers, you have to show them that you are worth following, and more importantly, that you’re offering them something they don’t already have. The best way to do this is to develop your individual edge. What reason would someone have for following you? Cultivate it. Allow your individual facet to direct what you put out, who you engage with and how you present yourself.

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Advertising Professor Brooke Duffy of Templeton University said people want to see themselves reflected in celebrities. “Part of (online success) is being the first one into whatever the niche is and trying to draw attention to it,” she said.

Niches can be anything from streaming video games, like YouTuber PewDiePie, or blogging about sex like sex educator Laci Greene. Whatever your niche is, allow it to be readily identifiable to a potential follower looking over your social media presence.

2. Engage with hot topics

The best way to get people to listen to you is to talk about things people want to hear about. Trending topics, top news, and recent events all offer the chance to bring in a new influx of followers. Talk about what others are talking about. Engage with them, make your opinion known.

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More importantly, give people a reason to want to respond. Promoting discussion helps your name spread (now someone else who follows the person you’re talking to can be introduced to you), and gives you a personality that helps identify you as an individual.

Engaging doesn’t mean antagonizing. Hot topics are frequently matters of conflict. Be sure you know what you’re talking about before you try to engage with an audience on a particular matter.

3. Remain responsive and active

Nothing will kill an internet following faster than inactivity and inaccessibility. If you appear to have disappeared, even if only for a short time, your hard-earned following will lose interest, and many will unsubscribe and forget. You’ll notice from this year’s Twitter trends, the most talked about are the most active. Post regularly across your social media accounts, too. Don’t neglect one in favor of another, which would limit your potential audience.

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Further, engage with followers on a personal level. Generic messages addressed to no one in particular are not as engaging as a direct conversation, and anyone who engages with you can feel as though you both recognized each other as people through your social media interaction. This keeps people interested and following.

4. Cross-promote yourself

The fastest way to limit your audience is to fail to build a social media presence on multiple platforms. Even if you’re building a niche that is geared towards a particular website, like Vine stars frequently are, you will want to fill out and engage with other platforms that you use to promote your content across all your accounts.

A dedicated follower may follow you on multiple accounts, but people frequently only check one or two sites regularly and may forget about you if you don’t actively try to remind them of your presence across multiple platforms to reach them as frequently as possible. Other social media accounts can be used to promote content stemming from one account, but remain critical for engaging with your followers.

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5. Curate your content carefully

When people follow you online, they often have a set of expectations for what they’re signing up for. It is important to keep this image in mind when curating your content, whether original or shared from someone else. Make sure what you’re sharing is interesting to other people, doesn’t seem like clutter, isn’t unwelcome or adversarial and doesn’t contradict what they expect from you.

Once you curate it, make it findable as well. Tag people in your posts and use hashtags to make sure as many people who might be interested in your voice can find your content as possible.

By thoughtfully curating your content and engaging with your audience, your online presence can grow quickly and efficiently, finding you success and fame in the competitive world of social media.

Featured photo credit: Nan Palmero via flickr.com

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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