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Why It’s Great To Be A Woman In Iceland And What Parents Can Learn From This

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Why It’s Great To Be A Woman In Iceland And What Parents Can Learn From This

Being a woman in the 21st century should be quite great, taking into consideration all the fights for equality women have won throughout history. Yet, there are still certain battles and stereotypes to be fought in order to create a society of respect and equal rights for everyone, and women from Iceland seem to know just how to do this.

False gender expectations

From their early years of childhood, girls are taught to be quieter, to not engage in demanding physical activities, and to be more demure altogether. They wear pink skirts and ribbons, play with dolls and learn how to cook, knit, and do other household chores. They are more encouraged to take care of their looks and not to aspire to achieve great things and take leadership roles.

Their teenage years are wasted in useless struggles to conform to the impossible beauty standards imposed by the media and in trying to reach this unachievable ideal of a perfect woman.

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Just when they reach a certain level maturity and gain confidence, new challenges arrive at work. Many fall victim to sexual assaults or feel underappreciated while still earning less than men in the same positions. When they start a family, there is a constant juggle between excelling at work and taking care of the entire family.

Gender-blind courage

The problem is deeply rooted and programmed in each person’s mind from the moment we are born. Therefore, if we want to take responsibility for creating a better social environment for future generations, we must start from the foundation, which is family, and continue through the educational system in order to create healthy environment where both genders will thrive.

The Iceland model seems quite successful, taking into consideration that it is a country with 80% of women working, 65% female students, and 40% female MPs. A truly inspiring educational approach in Iceland serves as not only an example of female empowerment, but a human one, as it is not concerned with teaching children how to be typically male or female, but how to be fully independent and strong individuals.

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As Margrét Pála Ólafsdóttir, the founder of Laufásborg nursery school in Reykjavik tells the Guardian, “We are training [our girls] to use their voice. We are training them in physical strength. We are training them in courage.”

Raising their voices

Another great lesson we can take from Icelandic women is how to teach children to fight for their rights. This particularly affects girls as they are stereotypically the “weaker” gender and are taught to be quiet and not to stand up for themselves.

As a protest against gender pay gap, thousands of Icelandic women left work 14% percent early on Monday, October 25, 2016 to show dissatisfaction with being paid 14% less than men. In doing so, they serve as role models for future generations of women and men who will understand that both genders are equal and, as such, are indispensable to society.

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Lessons on respect

There is a lot more to be learned from this country and passed down to our children about respecting one another. Iceland has a history of female rights movements that started in 1975 with 90% of its female working and domestic population taking to the streets to show dissatisfaction with unequal pay rates and the small percentage of women in the parliament. These movements created a social climate where five years into the future, Iceland became the first country in the world to have a democratically elected female president.

As years went by, new legislation concerning gender equality was passed, placing Iceland at the top of World Economic Forum’s gender gap index. Yet, they won’t stop there. There is still a fight for equal pay to be won.

Other countries should start copying the Iceland model in education and women empowerment. Parents should also do their part in teaching children of both genders that we are all born as equals, that we contribute equally to society, and that, as such, we should all be paid equally and have equal chances and opportunities to realize our potential.

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Educating children how to aspire towards a world without stereotypes or inequality will eventually lead to a better social climate for everyone, where fulfilled and respected women and men will create a more promising society.

Featured photo credit: https://unsplash.com/ via images.unsplash.com

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Ana Erkic

Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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