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10 Houseplants for a fresher breath of air at home

10 Houseplants for a fresher breath of air at home

With the amount of pollution witnessed through release of harmful pollutants from automobiles, factories, etc., some people are wanting to spend most of their free time indoors. Unfortunately, this is not helping them much as the indoor air quality, these days, is also compromised with volatile organic compounds (VOC’s). However, houseplants are widely used not just to improve home decor but also the air quality inside, giving a good boost to your overall health and morale.

Houseplants as more than functional decorations

The presence of something “green” elicits happy emotions and makes the atmosphere relaxing and peaceful, whether you are in your home or strolling in a garden. What’s more significant of the unmatched advantages of keeping houseplants in your home is their ability to ward off a number of negative effects on your body through pests, harmful toxins, poor indoor air, chemicals, etc.

Houseplants for a fresh breath of air at home

Lady Palm: Best houseplant (requiring less maintenance) to resist pests at home.

Aloe: This sun-loving houseplant will help clear common VOC’s like formaldehyde and benzene.

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Areca Palm: An adorable option to decorate your home, however, also highly effective to get rid of airborne toxins.

Spider Plant: A great air purifier that fights off VOC’s, carbon monoxide, and xylene, which incorporates chemically-related hydrocarbons used by leather, rubber, and printing firms. It’s also safe for pets at home.

Rubber Plant: It specifically removes the presence of formaldehyde from indoor air.

Golden Pothos: Consider it also as a phenomenal option to plant outdoors, maybe your garage, because it can battle formaldehyde which is a major content of car exhaust.

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Janet Craig: As cool as it sounds, this houseplant will help ease off your indoor air by eliminating trichloroethylene. It is another low maintenance option with attractive features.

Chrysanthemum: If you’re a frequent user of glue, paint, plastic, or detergent at home, this indoor plant should be a colorful option for you because it filters out benzene.

Ficus Alii: A natural resistant to pests while providing general air purification at home.

Peace Lily: It eliminates alcohol, acetone, trichloroethylene, benzene, and formaldehyde from indoor air, and evokes a romantic feeling in your room.

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What the researches and studies are concluding about houseplants

Several studies have reported the benefits of houseplants for human beings, and also the environment, such as the 2009 research published by the American Society of Horticultural Science in Science Daily which proves the effectiveness of houseplants in reducing indoor ozone (main component of air pollution) concentrations.

Natural remedy for managing asthma at home is a major boon offered by houseplants as they are capable of regulating indoor humidity levels and eliminating asthma triggers like allergens by providing a clean and pure supply of oxygen, vital for every organ of your body to function as they should. The 2009 research also proved how houseplants cancel one of the toxic ozone effects, i.e. reduction in lung function, which is related to asthma.

Not to forget, NASA along with the Associated Landscape Contractors of America identified the importance of houseplants for purifying air in space facilities in the late ‘80s. Thanks to their nature, these natural air purifiers and humidifiers are great at keeping respiratory conditions at check, which could be delayed by effects of long-term exposure to impure indoor air.

The benefits of houseplants do not end here. In a 2008 study, they were proved by Dutch researchers to have lowered stress levels for patients in hospitals than for those without any indoor plants in their rooms. It’s worth mentioning that houseplants are proving themselves time again as a strong home remedy to dismiss different triggers of asthma, this time by providing a reposeful and calming environment for stress and anxiety related asthma.

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Finally, below is an interesting infographic on NASA’s guide to Air-Filtering Houseplants by lovethegarden.com.

nasa-air-filter-house-plants

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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