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Researches Find That Your Weight Can Affect Your Brain

Researches Find That Your Weight Can Affect Your Brain

The common belief if that our weight can affect only our physical health and there’s absolutely no chance for it to affect our brain.

Obesity is certainly a horrible thing but it’s surely not so horrible that it will destroy the neurons in our brains right?

In fact, don’t many of us adopt a sedentary lifestyle to focus more on our career and work which basically involves sitting in front of a computer screen with take-out pizzas and gaining weight?

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The Truth:

Well, here’s the harsh truth. As per a study, our weight can seriously affect the size of our brains and how quickly it deteriorates. Which means obesity and brain function are linked and that obesity can affect the white matter inside our skull. This not only leads to dementia, Alzheimer’s and depression but it also affects memory, language and visual skills. Battling obesity has never been this important.

The Research:

Scientists at the University of Cambridge did an experiment to see if obesity speeded up the brain shrinkage process that occurs naturally with age. The findings were published in the Neurobiology of Aging, titled ‘Obesity Associated With Increased Brain-Age From Mid-Life.’

The Procedure:

They tested 473 adults between the ages 20 to 87 of varying weights looking to for unusual differences in their comparative results. They found out that leaner middle-aged people had more white matter than those who were overweight. So the average 50-year-old obese individual had the brain matter of someone at least 10 years older than him.

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In short, obesity deteriorates your brain.

Limitations:

However, this study does have some limitations. For instance, when the obese people were tested on their IQ, their overall cognitive ability remained unaffected thus hinting that more research needs to be done to establish the exact link between weight and brain function.

As Paul Fletcher, co-author of the research and psychiatry professor at the University of Cambridge says, “Going forward, older obese people should specifically be studied when it comes to obesity and premature ageing of the brain. We’re living in an ageing population, with increasing levels of obesity, so it’s essential that we establish how these two factors might interact since the consequences for health are potentially serious.”

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What’s Important:  

Nevertheless, white matter, often dubbed as the ‘subway of the brain’ is responsible for maintaining connections between different areas of the brain and controlling neuron response, so a decrease in white matter is definitely dangerous and can lead to further complications.

What You Should Do:

If you’re reading this, you’re either obese and panicking or, you’re not obese but still worried. However, there is no reason to panic or be anxious about this, as obesity, like diabetes and other serious ailments can be kept under control and even minimised with these two simple steps.

1. First off, get off the couch and get some exercise. The more active you remain, the better. Try to get into an exercise regime. You can join a gym or set up one in your own house, or if these options are too expensive, get creative. Use the stairs instead of the lift, stretch and do yoga, be more active in the house, do at least  20-30 sit ups every day and go for long walks to contemplate your life.

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2. Eat healthy. Keep a food diary or use an app to track your calories. Either way, keep junk food to a minimum. Take cooking lessons if possible or consult a dietitian to make a special chart for you and reward yourself for sticking to it.

In short, prioritise your health before anything else in your life, and that includes your career and monthly salary. If you’re looking for more ideas to lose weight check out these articles:

10 Simple Natural Hacks To Help You Lose Weight Fast
Four Ways to Lose Weight Fast
The 10 Easiest And Most Effective Tips For Weight Loss

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Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

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