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Keylogger Tips and Practical Uses

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Keylogger Tips and Practical Uses

Keylogger is a software program that captures keystrokes on a computer or machine and stores the information as a file that someone can remotely access in order to see what’s being typed on a computer. The software is often associated with harmful purposes like running illegal file distribution, stealing user data, and credit card number scams.

Why Use Keylogger?

We live in a digital age where everything you do online is there forever, so a keylogger can actually help inhibit risky online behavior.

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Most people find the idea of espionage on personal and business computers unprofessional, but sometimes it is necessary. When we leave our homes we have no idea what our children are up to on the internet and social media, which is filled with people you can’t trust. Thus, it becomes necessary that we keep an eagle eye on our personal computers when we are away from home.

In a business environment — while we would like to think that all the people we employ are hardworking, trustworthy, and honest — there are some individuals with bad intentions who will ride on the good reputations of others while abusing the corporate machine. The relative damage these few rotten ones can cause as a result of greed and personal gain is directly proportional to their position in the office. Such acts can cause tremendous damage to a company.

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Personal and Corporate Keylogger

There are plenty of legal and useful versions of this tool, both for personal and corporate use. It is recommended that before purchasing and installing any keylogger, always research about that particular keylogger. In addition, read some reviews because there are many dubious keyloggers out there, and so you might want to stay clear of poorly reviewed ones in favor of a paid program with an identity and some level of trust. For your own safety, it is highly recommended that you purchase a keylogger instead of using a free download.

Keylogger is often designed for different purposes; therefore, it is important that you go for ones which can multi-task, both for personal and corporate use irrespective of the network or framework involved.

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10 Tips for Choosing a Good Keylogger

Care should be taken in choosing a good keylogger. Analysis of several keylogger tools, like Wolfeye keylogger and others, revealed these 10 tips for choosing a good keylogger.

  1. A good keylogger should be able to run secretly in the background without being noticed by the user while capturing every key that is pressed. That way it is possible to spy on every email and record every conversation.
  2. A good keylogger should be able to record every website that the user visits on the internet while allowing screenshots to be taken at specific intervals without the user’s consent.
  3. A good keylogger should have functions that will have all logged in data sent to a specific email address on a regular basis for backup purposes.
  4. A good keylogger should be able to act like a monitoring device for detecting unauthorized access.
  5. A good keylogger should act in stealth mode and remain unnoticed.
  6. A good keylogger should have regular updates so as not to be susceptible to malware and other spamware tools.
  7. A good keylogger should be flexible and easy to use.
  8. A good keylogger should be able to handle some amount of data processing without crashing.
  9. A good keylogger should not expose the authorized user.
  10. A good keylogger should be secure and safeguarded from unwanted intrusion with the sole aim of stealing data.

Remember, it is very important that you read reviews and check the specific functions before purchasing a specific keylogger and paying for a subscription.

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Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com/ via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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