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10 Life-Changing Skills You Can Learn Online Without Going Broke

10 Life-Changing Skills You Can Learn Online Without Going Broke

The future of education is online. Today, you can learn just about anything you want, such as photography, public speaking and even how to speak a foreign language.

These life-changing skills are not meant to be solely learned in the classroom. By taking these learnings online, you can often learn it without going broke, and it saves you the time of commuting to go to a school or meet a private teacher.

We’ve collected the top 10 life-changing skills you can learn online, where to learn them, and what you can expect from them. Enjoy, and hope it helps you.

1. Photography

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    Where to learn: CreativeLIVE
    How much you’ll pay: ~$200

    CreativeLIVE is the world’s largest live-streaming destination for educational content. They have dozens of classes in photography, marketing, design, business, and more. You can learn from the best teachers in their respective industries.

    2. Personal Budgeting

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      Where to learn: Dave Ramsey
      How much you’ll pay: ~$100

      Dave Ramsey is known to be the personal finance guru. On his website, he provides in-person and online classes for people to join, in order to sharpen their personal finance and budgeting skills. His most popular class is just $100.

      3. Foreign Languages

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        Where to learn: Rype
        How much you’ll pay: ~$5/lesson. Use this calculator to get an estimate.

        Rype is the leading platform online for private language lessons with a professional teacher. Every teacher on the platform has been hand-selected and pre-vetted for you to ensure the highest quality in terms of experience, personality, and professionality.

        4. Public Speaking

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          Where to learn: Dale Carnegie
          How much you’ll pay: $299

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          Dale Carnegie is known to be one of the most prestigious training institutions for leadership and public speaking training. Warren Buffett himself claimed that it was one of the best investments he’s ever made.

          5. Musical Instruments

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            Where to learn: Lessonface
            How much you’ll pay: $25-30/lesson

            Lessonface brings music lessons online with the best teachers. You can take guitar lessons, drum lessons, piano lessons, and much more from the comforts of your own home.

            6. Coding

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              Where to learn: Codeacademy
              How much you’ll pay: $0

              Codeacademy is the leading platform for learning how to code online. You can learn popular software languages like HTML, CSS, Javascript, Ruby on Rails, and more. What’s useful about Codeacademy is that it’s not teaching you theory, but you get to practice real-time, and even build your own application as you’re learning.

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              7. Leadership

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                Where to learn: MindTools
                How much you’ll pay: $27/month

                MindTools is an online course learning website teaching you everything from leadership skills, team management, strategy, stress management, and more. If you’re a young professional, business owner, or a manager, you can upgrade your skills today using MindTools.

                8. Health & Fitness

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                  Where to learn: Fitnessglo
                  How much you’ll pay: $12/mo

                  Fitnessglo is like Netflix for fitness classes. You can take as many of their online classes from your home, at the office, or at your gym and achieve your fitness goals.

                  9. Meditation

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                    Where to learn: Calm.com
                    How much you’ll pay: $0

                    Calm is your meditation teacher on-demand. You can choose from multiple background sounds to meditation guides, and have someone guide you through a meditation practice. It’s perfect for beginners just getting started in meditation or anyone that wants to destress after a long day.

                    10. Investing

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                      Where to learn: Investopedia.com
                      How much you’ll pay: $0

                      Investopedia is not only a resource hub for all types of investing knowledge, but they also have a stock stimulator that allows you to invest fake money into real-world scenarios. You can start with $100,000 and invest into stocks and test your theory before using your real, hard-earned cash in the stock market.

                      What are your favorite websites that we’ve listed to learn a skill? Share it with a friend today!

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                      The Gentle Art of Saying No

                      The Gentle Art of Saying No

                      No!

                      It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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                      But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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                      What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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                      But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

                      1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
                      2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
                      3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
                      4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
                      5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
                      6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
                      7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
                      8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
                      9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
                      10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

                      Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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